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International fidHton 



July 1983 $Z49yi 
Issue #274 



:^ode- Lovers' 
pecial Issue 

I Articles 

Antarctic 
mtennas 

'age 80 

Home-Brew 
tize- Winner 

age 32 

lleup at 
kbu Ail 

age 94 



iRT 



aytonia 

age 6 

What 
Happened 

at Heard? 



Page 20 


1 


1 


07 


CI , 1 1 






74470 


65946 





Amateur Radio's 
lechnical Journal 



A Wiyne Green PubtteatkHi 



You Can Build This Code Trainer 

More than a mefe code-pfactice 
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The True Story Behind Heard Island 

Fighting bad weather, shady ship owners, 
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there was only half the battle. VKSNL 

More Stable Than a Rock 

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W6KG, W6QL 



Heard lsland~20 



Never Say Die— 
73 International— 70 
Ham He!p-ai, 100, 
122, 126 

Social Events— 9d 
FCC— 101 
Letters— 102 
Circuits— 103 
Contests— 104 
Awards— 105 



58 



64 



82 



90 



94 



RTTY Loop— 107 

Reader Service— 114 
DX-11« 

Corrections— 117 
Satellites- 117 
New Products— 118 
Review- 119 
Dealer 

Directory- 146 
P ropaga t Ion — 1 46 



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4 73 Magazine * July, 1983 



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INFO 



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73 Magazine * July, 1963 5 



W2NSD/1 

NEVER SAY DIE 

editoriat t>y Wayne Green 




THE DAYTON DAZE 

Two of the manufacturers ex- 
hibiting at Dayton were in a 
heated argument as I passed by, 
with one holding that the Ham- 
vention officfals were lying 
through their teeth about the at- 
tendance. . .that there certainly 
were no more than 27,000 hams 
there instead of the 30,000 offi- 
cial count at that time. Wet!, dur- 
ing the rainy early Saturday 
morning, Til tell you thrs: You 
could hardly move from one 
place to another. 

Once the sun came out, the 
hordes poured into the flea-mar- 
ket area and eased the pres- 
sures a tad. It was still crowded 
inside, but at least you coutd 
move around. 

After trying to communicate 
with a packed roomful of people 
last year, fighting the thunder- 
ous noises from the two adja- 
cent meeting rooms and what 
seemed like 100*^ heal and hu- 
midity, I wasn't even going to try 
this year. But the Hamventton 
people suggested I give it anoth- 
er try in a more isolated room, . , 
and at a more isolated time. So I 
got up there on the podium Fri- 
day afternoon, before many of 
the brethren had yet arrived for 
the hamfest, and did my stint. It 
was better, but still marginal. 
Next year, Tm told that there will 
be some new meeting rooms 
where we'll have quiet* 

Since many of those present 
indicated that they preferred a 
stiff code test as part of our 
amateur entry fee— never mind 
what the lack of growth has 
done to our country, with the 
loss of one consumer electron- 
ics industry after another, a loss 
getting up into the dozens of 
billions of dollars a year, . . 
and never mind what this is do- 
ing to us in the way of military 
weakness (it's better to lose the 

6 73 Magazine • July, 1983 



country than acknowledge the 
changes in technology and cope 
with them) — keeping that in 
mind, I came out strongly in 
favor of Morse code and was 
met with great enthusiasm. 

Fine. . . let's by all means go 
with what everyone wants, no 
matter how destructive rl is. 
Let's make it so that we put our 
licenses where our mouths are 
. . .if code really is important, 
then let's make sure that each 
and every ham has to requalify 
every year and prove the ability 
to copy. 

None of this silly five words 
per minute. That isn't code! 
That's baloney. The ability to 
copy code starts at 13 per, so 
that should again be made the 
irreducible minimum. That 
should be Ifie starting speed. 
But then, remembering that we 
are now agreeing that code is of 
high importance, can we hon- 
estly support anything other 
than a new "Incentive licensing" 
plan which will move us on up to 
at least 35 words per minute? 
Any ham really worthy of being a 
ham should be able to get to 
that speed in a few weeks. . . so 
let's set that as the ticket for 
holding your license. 

Many of those present were 
nodding eagerly in total agree- 
ment, licking their chops at the 
thought of being able to knock 
90% or more of the hams out of 
the hobby and back into CB 
where they belong. When I sug- 
gested 50 wpm for everyone, 
they were wildly enthusiastic. 
That could easily knockout 98% 
and QRM would be a thing of the 
past. Good grief, we might even 
have enough room so that we 
could go back to spark! 

A couple of spoilsport wom- 
en, obviously too lazy to really 
care about being hams, got mad 
over this and stormed out of the 



room. They probably never 
learned the code anyway... 
being licensed by a good friend 
who overlooked that little re- 
quirement. 

The talk was fun. 

In looking around the ex- 
hibits, I noticed that good old 
Bash was there, but everyone 
was giving this booth a wide 
berth. There were even some 
chaps talking about a "trash 
Bash" move to stop this prosti- 
tuting of the ham ticket. And not 
a few hams came to me won- 
dering what all the fuss about 
no-code was when with the new 
Bash code tapes one could pass 
the code test without even being 
able to copy the code. I had a 
good friend who got his Extra 
ticket that way. He had only 
slight ability to copy code. . . 
and virtually no theory under- 
standing. He just wanted to see 
if one could Bash one's way to 
success without knowing a 
damned thing and was greatly 
surprised when he walked out 
with a lovely one-ietter call 
suffix. 

The development of ever 
smaller Morse-code readers has 
brought us to the tiny hand-held 
decoder. With that^ anyone can 
copy code at almost any 
speed. , .certainly up to around 
100 words per minute. If we can 
take that In with us for the 
license exam, that should solve 
the whole code problem... 
right? Oh, I can hear the purists 
bitching . . . ''Yes, but what if the 
battery burns out?" We heard 
the same complaint when kids 
started using hand calculators 
instead of learning their multi- 
plication tables. The answer to 
that is so simple: soler pow&r. 

They have inexpensive soiar 
power cells which can run the 
decoder just from the glare of a 
Morse-code fanatic's eye. So 



STAFF 



plj^LlSHER/EOITDR 

Way no Green W2NSD.'1 

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TO THE PRESIDENT 

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• Digital VFO's for best stability. 

50-Hz step, switchable to 5 00 -Hz or 5-kHz. 
F, LOCK switch provided. 



• Ten memories Store frequency^ band, 
and mode data. 

Complete information on frequency, band, 
and mode is stored in meTllor>^ assuring 
maximum ease of operation. Each mem- 
ory may be tuned as a VFO. Original 
memory frequency may be recalled. 
ALITO. M switch for automattc storage of 
current operating data, or, when offt selec- 
tive storage of data using M. IN switch, 

• Llthiuni battery memory back-up. 
(Est. 5 yr. life J 

« Programmable memory scan* 

Scans all memories, or may be pro- 
grammed to scan speciOe memories. 
HOLD switch interrupts scanning. Fre- 
quency, band, and mode are automatically 
selected in accordance with the memory 
channel being scanned. The scanning 
time Is approximately 2 seconds 
per channel. 

• Programmable band scan* 

Scants automatically within the pro- 
grammed bandwidth. Memory channels 9 
and establish upper and lower scan 
limits. HOLD switch interrupts scanning. 
Frequency may be adjusted, using ttie 
tuning coriljrGl, during scan lipLD. 

• Fluorescent tube digital display 
(100 -^Hz resolution). 

Built-in 7 digit fiuorescenL tube digital 
display indicates frequency or time, plus 
memory channel number. DIM switch pro- 
vided* The display mav be switched to 
indicate CLOCK-2. FREQUENCY, CLOCK-1, 
and timer ON or OFF by the front panel 
FUNCTION switch. 

• Dual 24 -hour quartz clocks^ with timen 

• Three built-in IF filters with HARROW/ 
WniE selector switch. (CW filter optj 

6 -kHz wide or 2. 7 -kHz narrow on AM. 
2.7-kHz automatic on SSB. 2.7-kHz wide 



on CW. or. with optional YG^455C filter 
installed. 500~Hz narrow. 15-kHz auto- 
matic on FM, 

• Squelch circuit, all mode, built-in, with 
BUSY Indicator. 

• Noise blanker buUt-in, 

• Large front m^ounted speaker. 

• Tone control. 

• RF step attenuator. (0-10-20-30 dB.) 
Four step attenuator, plus antenna fuse. 

• AGO switch. tSlow-Fast,l 

• "S" meter, with SINFO "S" scale, 

• 100/120/220/240 VAC» or 13,8 VDC 
operation (widi opt. tJCK-l cable kit). 

Other features. 

• RECORD output Jack. 

• Audible "beeper** (through speaker). 

• Carrying handle. 

• Headphone jat;k, 

• External speaker jack. 

Optional accessories: 

• VC-10 118-174 MUz converter. 

• HS-4, HS-5. HS-6, HS-7 headphones. 

• DCK-1 DC cable kit. 

• YG-455C 500-Hz CW lilten 

• HC-10 World digitid quBkrtz clock. 

• AL-2 Surge Shunt 

VC-IQ subject to FCC approval 

More information on the R-2000 is 
available from all authorized decile rs of 
Trio-Kenwood Communications 
11 H West Walnut Street 
Compton, California 90220. 

KENWOOD 

.pacesetter tn amateur radio 



specific aiionfi and prices ar^ subject to change wUhout notice or obligaiion. 




QSL OF THE MONTH 

This eye-catching card from laio Santos HK3EOJ In Bogota, Colombia^ eeslly outshined 
the competition to win this rnontti'a OSL card cpmeat. This coJorfut card features a 
modemistJC Shack rasemi:)img Mission ComroU amoti^ which 15 remforced by the large 
dish in the backgrounil and a quad amenna wtiich Ulerilly sparkles Furthet back, the 
stars shine over a haloed sun setting *nto llie Andes mountains— a scene ^hich would 
be t>eautihjl from any shack. 

It you would like to enter TTs OSt of tti« Month Contest. encHose ^Uf card ir^ an 
envelope an^t send it to 73, Pine Stteet. Peterborough HH 0345B, Attn: QSL of the t^onth. 
Entries witt>out an envelope or book choice will not be considered. 



let's Stop worrying about the 
code, okay? It has turned out 
that kids do just fine without 
memorizing the multipiicatlon 
tables. Those calculators don't 
wear out much. ..and solar 
power keeps 'em charged. 

Speaking of the code^ for 
those who think the code can be 
fun, AEA has a new gadgel 
which will drive you crazy. They 
showed the first version of it last 
year at Dayton and this little 
bugger simulates a CW contact 
with you. Now they've updated it 
and you're In there fighting with 
a bunch of other stations trying 
to work some rare DX...all 
done by computer. I see this as a 
great gadget for hamfests to 
use for simulated DX contests* 
Hotshot DX ops can sit down at 
a DX simulator and see what 
kind of a score they can make in 
ten to twenty minutes of oper- 
ating. That should be a balL 

With more and more of the 
CW ops using keyboards and 
GOde copiers, unless we stress 
the fun of the code, we may find 
that few, if any, hams are actual- 
ly able to copy the code any- 
more. Almost all of the high* 
speed CW you hear on the 
bands these days is computer- 
generated and -copied- The 
Novice bands still have a few 
people hanging around chirping 
out half-hour CQs, hoping that 
no one will answer. 

OTHER DAYTONIA 

Out In the outer fringes of ex- 
hibitors, I was surprised to find a 

8 73 Magazine • July, 1983 



booth run by the CIA. !t seems 
they are pepping up their com- 
munications facilities and are in 
need of technicians- I've got 
some pretty good friends who 
went into this kind of work and 
they've certainly had interesting 
lives as a result. If you're the 
kind of person who likes to trav- 
el and see unusual places, this 
might be worth checking out. 

loom was wowing 'em with 
their 12CX3*MH2 repeater. It's set 
up for FM use, but I'll bet if they 
modify it a bit so that it will han- 
dle television, they'll have a 
bunch of customers. Ham televi- 
sion feaily should be up on 1200 
MHz and not crammed onto one 
channel on 420 MHz. 

And both Kenwood and 
Yaesu had new rigs which were 
showstoppers. You'll be seeing 
reviews of 'em here as soon as 
we can get our mitts on the rigs 
to check them out. Ten-Tec had 
a nice little 2m HT which I sus- 
pect is going to be very popular. 
We've been promised one of 
those soon, too. 

The Hamvention is aiways a 
seething mass of hams going 
around the exhibits and then 
scouring the enormous flea mar- 
ket for bargains. If the show 
gets any bigger, I don*t know 
where they could put it. The poor 
old Hara Arena in Dayton Is just 
plain overwhelmed. Gars fill 
almost every neighboring field 
and the huge lots at the arena 
and line the streets for almost a 
mile around. The people in the 
neighborhood are uptight over 



the cars, but when about 30,000 
hams descend on one place, it 
takes a lot of parking to han- 
dle 'em. 

There was some sort of has- 
sle over the flea market not be- 
ing opened on Friday and a good 
deai of flak went up over that. 
And just to make the situation 
worse, the opening on Saturday 
was accompanied by a deluge. 
It cleared off in the afternoon 
just fine, but there were an awful 
lot of very unhappy fleas for a 
while, 

Ohio has a new law aimed at 
getting tax payments on sales 
by f tea-market exhibitors. This is 
mainly for the few professional 
flea-market salespeople who 
make a living at it and have been 
thus avoiding paying the stiff 
Ohio sales tax. The Ham vent ion 
crew shelled out S5 each for the 
flea-market exhibitors to keep 
the authorities off their backs. I 
think they remembered the prob- 
lems at Rochester, where the 
police came in and virtually 
closed down the flea market . . , 
and the regular exhibitors, too. 
That disaster almost ruined the 
Rochester Hamfesl, which has 
been struggling to get back to 
strength ever since then. 

For a show of its size, the 
Hamvention went very smooth* 
ly. It's three days long and it 
takes you that much lime to 
really see just the inside ex* 
hibits. much less cover the flea 
market. . .which had about 600 
exhibitors this year, I under- 
stand. Nine in the morning until 
eight at night is a grueling job 
for the poor exhibitors, but 
perhaps it's worth it so that 
everyone has more of a chance 
to see everything. It's only once 
a year. 

REAL HAMS 

One thing the mail about the 
proposed code changes has 
made crystal clear Is that there 
stili are a substantial number of 
Real Hams around, despite the 
decimation of our ranks by what 
the communists called "incen* 
tive licensing," 

For instance, the Real Ham 
does not use sideband. , .that's 
for wimps. The Real Ham sticks 
to the Real Ham communica- 
tions mode: CW. Oh, the Real 
Ham gets on two meters, too, 
but no Real Ham signs his call 
more than once every half hour 
or so. After all, the Real Ham 
only talks to damned good 
friends* . .other Real Hams. , , 
and everyone knows who's who 
by the voices, so who needs an 



ID? The more often you sign 
your calf, the more of a wimp 
you are. And no one but a leap- 
ing faggot would prissily de- 
mand that the breaker identify 
himself. 

Real Hams, when they devel- 
op Parkinson's Disease, which a 
growing number of them have, 
and can no longer make that old 
straight key talk, do go on 
phone, . , but you can bedamried 
sure they go on AM, not wimpy 
sidet>and with the ducks and 
other fruits. 

Real Hams have a key in one 
hand and a six pack of cool 807s 
by the other. They eat pretzels 
while hamming and steak and 
potatoes for dinner. Prjngles? 
You've got to be kidding! You 
ought to have your keying hand 
mashed in the door for even 
thinking such an obscene 
thought. 

DANGEROUS DXTKG 

Alas, I didn*t see any mention 
of amateur radio in the news 
reports of the ill-fated Sprally 
DXpedition. You've probably 
read about it. It had to do with a 
group of German DXers heading 
to Spratiy on a catamaran. They 
unfortunately managed to find 
the islands and were shot out of 
the water by the Vietnameset 
who killed one of the DXpedi- 
tioners. The other five drifted for 
nine days in a dinghy, with one 
dying of dehydration before the 
rest were picked up. 

As I recall, the last bunch of 
DXers who tried to get Spratiy 
off the endangered DX list got 
shot at, but not with quite such 
disastrous results. You'd think 
that DXers would take a look at 
history before going to Spratiy. 

The first ham to put Spratiy on 
the air, back in the 60s, the chap 
who invented the 1S call (much 
to the annoyance of the ITU), 
figured out how to get all the 
contacts he wanted from there 
without all that danger. As far as 
1 know, he did his entire Spratiy 
exercise from up in central 
Thailand, the same place he 
used to make his Burma and 
Cambodia exercises, I suspect. I 
have the cards from those oper- 
ations and they are acceptable 
for DXCC. 

DXpeditionlng used to be a lot 
easier. . ,and more fun. . .when 
the ARRL didn't put hams in 
danger of their lives. No one 
really gave a damn whether the 
DXpedition was exactly precise- 
ly where It claimed to be or not. 

Continued on page 124 




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CLEANLIN 

a unique CORSAIR virtue 

Cleanliness in the TEN-TEC CORSAIR m^ans unusual spectral purity of both 
received and transmitted signals. 

In Receive mode, even with the r,f, preamp in operation, the 3rd order 
intercept (at 20 kHz tone spacing) is +5 dBm. With the preamplifier off, the 3rd 
order intercept rises to a superlative +18 dBm and remains constant even at 3 
to 6 kHz away from the pass- band. 

In Transmit mode, if you look at the output of the CORSAIR on a spec- 
trum analyzer, you note an almost complete absence of phase noise— a phe- 
nomenon which plagues most PLL tiansceivers. At 20 kHz from the carrier, the 
generated phase noise in the CORSAIR is a spectacular - 148 dBc/Hz, and at 
lkHzltis-132dBc/H2,* 

This breakthrough in circuit design, using proven crystal mixed oscillators 
with the latest USA solid state technology, is setting new standards of cleanli- 
ness and purity of signals. All of which means enhanced reception with less 
fatigue, lower noise floor^ no overloading and more DX worked. And your sig- 
nal will be a bit easier to read under adverse conditions. Compare. 

Other virtues of the CORSAIR include: 
• All solid state, broadband design • All 9 hf bands • Triple conversion re- 
ceiver with 0.25 fjM sensitivity on all bands and better than 90 dB dynamic 
range • Variable bandwidth plus Passband tuning • Dual range, Triple mode, 
Offset tuning • Variable Notch filter • Built-in Speech Processor • Built-in 
Noise Blanker • 200 W input, 100% duty cycle • Dual-speed QSK (full or 
s^mi) • Many operating conveniences including headphone attenuator, cw sig- 
nal spotter, 5- function meter, WWV reception, adjustable ALC threshold 
lighted status indicators, selectable AGC. adjustable pitch and volume of side- 
tone^ complete interfacing. • Full accessory line including remote VFO, keyers, 
microphones, power supplies, antenna tuners, ssb and cw filters. • Reliable 
American manufacture and service, fully warranted. 

See CORSAIR at your TEN-TEC dealer, or write for full details. 
TEN-TEC, Inc., Sevierville, TN 37862 

^Specifications m€€i$ured by independent hboratory 



MFJ RTTY / ASCII / CW 

COMPUTER INTERFACE 

Lets you send and receive computerized RTTY /ASCI I /CW. Copies all 
shifts and all speeds. Copies on both mark and space. Sharp 8 Pole active 
filter for 170 Hz shift and CW. Plugs between your rig and VIC-20, Apple, 
TRS-80C, Atari, TI-99, Commodore 64 or most other personal computers. 
Uses Kantronics software and most other RTTY/CW software. 




Copies on both mark and space tones. 
Plugs between rig and VIC -20, Apple, 
TRS-80C, Atari, Tl-99, Commodore 
64 and most other personal computers. 
Uses Kantronics software and most 
other BTTY/CW software. 




Tlllt nsw MFJ*1224 RTTY/ASCIl/QW Computef 
Intsrfaca lets you use your personal compytar as a 
computerized full featured RTTYMSCII/CW station 
for sending and receiving. 

It plugs between your rig and your VIC'2D. Apple, 
TRS-80C. Atari, 11-99, CommodOfe 64. and most 
other personal computers. 

II uies th« Kantronics sattware wlilch features SpElt 
screen display, 1024 character type ahead buffer, 10 
message ports (255 characters each), status display, 
CW-ID from keyboard, Centronic type printer 
compatit)lllty, CW send/rK^ive 5-99 WPM/ RTTY 
send/recerve 60, 67. 75. 100 WPM. ASCII send/ 
receive 110, 300 t^ud plus more. 

YtMi csn also use mest other RTTY/CW softwm 
with nearly any personal computer. 

A 2 LED tuning indicator system makes tuning 
ts&U easy and positive. Ymi can distinguish between 
RTTY/CW wittioiit even hearing it. 

Onca tiinatt In, the intertace allows you to copy any 
shift (170. 425. 850 Hz and all shifts between arid be- 
yond) and any spe«J (5 to 100 WPM on RTTY/CW 
arxj up to 300 baud on ASCII). 

Copies on both mark and space, no! mark only or 
space onfy. if either the mark or space Is lost the 
MFJ-1Z24 maintains copy 05 the remaining lone. 
This greatly improves copy under adverse conditions. 

A sharp I poll ictive filter for 170 Hz shift and CW 
allows good copy under crowded, fading and weak 
signal conditions Uses FET Input op-amps. 

An automatic nolso iimlter helps suppress static 



crashes for better copy. 

A Normat/Reversa switch eliminates retunfng 
while stepping thru various RTTY speeds and shifts. 

Tlie demodulator wifl even maintain copy on a 
slightly drifting signal. 

A +250 VDC loop output is available to drive your 
RTTY machine. Has convenient speaker output jack. 

Phase continuous AFSK transmitter tones are 
generated t>y a clean, stable Exar 2206 function gen- 
erator Standard space tones o1 2125 Hz and mark 
tones of 2295 and 2975 Hz are generated. A set of 
microphone lines Is provided tor AFSK out, AFSK 
ground. PTT out and PTT ground. 

FSK keying is provided for transceivers with FSK, 

High v«lta§a gritt block and direct aiftpifts are 
pnwtded for CW keying of your transmitter. A CW 
transmit LED provides visual indl^tlon of CW trans- 
mission. There Is also an external hand key or 
etectronic keyer Input jack. 

In addttJon to tfie Kantronics compatible socket, an 
exclusive general purpose socket allows interladr>g to 
nearly any personal computer witti most appropriate 
software. The following TTL compatltsfe Irnes are 
available: RTTY demod out, CW demod out, CW-ID 
input. +5 VDC. ground, Afl signal lines are buffered 
and can be inverted using an internal DIP switch. 

For example, you can use Galfo software with 
Apple computers, or RAK software with ViC-20's. 
Some computers with some software may require 
some external components. 

DC voltagei are IC regulated to provide stable 




MFJ-1224 



AFSK tones and Rnv/ ASCI I /CW reception. 

Afumfnum cabinet. Brushed aluminum front panel. 
8x1 y^x6 inches. Uses 12-15 VDC or 110 VAC with op- 
rinnal adapter, MFJ-1312, $9.95. 

RTTY/ ASCII /CW Receive Only 
SWL Computer Interfaoe 




69 

MFJ-122S 



95 



Use your persona! computer to receive commerdaK 
military and amateur RTTY/ASCII/CW traffic. 

The MFJ-I2a automatjcally copies alf shifts (850. 
425. 170 Hz shift and all others) and all spe«js. 

tt plugs between your receiver and VIC*?0, Apple. 
TRS-80C, Atefl, Tl'99. CDmmodore B4 and most other 
personai computers. 

U uses Kantronics software which featurpw CW re- 
ceive 5-99 WPM. RTTY receive 60.67.75,100 WPM. 
and ASCII receive 110. 300 baud, plus more 

An automatic noise limiter tielps suppress static 
crashes tor better copy, while a simple 2 LED tuning 
indicator system makes tuning fast, easy and positive. 

In addition to the Kantronics compatible socket, a 
general purpose socket provides RTTY out, RTTY in- 
verted out. CW out. CW inverted out, ground and 
+5VDC for interfacing to nearly any personal 
compnter with most appropriate software, 

Audio in, speaker out jacks. 4'/;x1 y^x4V4 In, 12-t5 
VDC or 110 VAC with adapter, MFJ^1312, $9.95. 



ORDER ANY PRODUCT FROM MFJ AND TRY IT-NO 
OBLIGATION. IF NOT DELIGHTED, RETURN WITH^ 
IN 30 DAYS FOR PROMPT REFUND {LESS SHIPPING), 

• One year uncondltlMsl guarantee • Made in USA. 

• Add S4.00 each shipplng/tiar>dilng • Call or write 
for fm catalog, ovar tOO producti. 




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Box 494, MtttittfppI State. MS 39762 



TO ORDER OR FOR YOUR NEAREST 
DEALER, CALLTOLL^FREE 

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10 73 Magazine * July, 1983 



HUSTLER 

DELIVERS 
RELIABLE , 

ALL BAND HF / 
PERFORMANCE 



Hustler's new 6-BTV six- 
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Thirty 
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Solid brass adaptors molded into neoprene; 
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Models for roof, trunk or magnetic 
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73 Magazine * July, 1983 11 



You Can Build 
This Code Trainer 

More than a mere code-practice oscillator, this CPU -controlled 

trainer features burned-in practice groups. 
Flick a switch and you have a keyer. 



If you are a ham who wants 
to upgrade or a ham to 
be, or if you know someone 
who wants to be a ham, 
there is now a low-cost, 
single-chip microcomputer 
for you. It is called the CPP1 . 
The CPP1 is a single-chip 
microcomputer that con- 
tains copyrighted software 
for teaching Morse code. 
It also doubles as an 
electronic keyer (iambic) for 
added versatility. 



The unit can be built in 
one evening. This makes it 
ideal for the time-pressed 
person who would rather be 
involved with amateur radio 
than with computer technol- 
ogy. Virtually everything is 
contained on the chip ex- 
cept the dot clock and the 
tone generator. These are 
built around the low-cost 
555 timer chip. 

Learning Morse code using 
tapes and records is a frus- 




Photo A. The CPP1 circuit hoard. 
12 73 Magazine • July. 1983 



trating experience. It's diffi- 
cult to concentrate when 
you have to keep stopping 
and rewinding to the begin- 
ning of a particular practice 
group. Also, tapes and rec- 
ords never seem to have the 



right speeds to practice at. 
They are either too fast or 
too slow. 

Personal computers are 
far better. However, their 
cost is a problem, especially 



^l-HIH-^t 



E>OT. 
CLOCK 



/Z , SPEE& 

^^^ ' RT ADJUST 




KEYER 

< OytPUT 



500H2 TONE 
GENERATOR 



V+'5 VOLTS ±10^ 



SPEIIAKER 



Fig. 1. Schematic. 









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if your budget is tight. In ad- 
dition, most people do not 
have the technical or soft- 
ware knowledge to make 
this approach viable. 

The CPPI solves both of 
these problems. The chip 
contains 15 practice tables. 
They are organized to pro- 
vide for ease of learning. 
When a particular table is 
selected, it will repeat until 
the user decides to move on, 
Speed is virtually unlimited, 
however; with the compo- 
nents called out later, the 
processor will send perfect 
code from 2 wpm to over 40 
wpm. Finally, it is simple to 
use. No need for a degree in 
computer sciences to use it; 
just select and go. 

Circuit Description 

The heart of the code 
trainer/keyer is the CPPI. 
Contained in this 40-pin 
package are 128 bytes of 
RAM, 2K of ROM, an 8-bit 
CPU, a reset circuit, a clock, 
and predefined I/O ports. It 
is a true system on stiicon. 

To get the CPPI to func- 
tion requires a simple crys- 
tal/capacitor addition to 
pins 2 and 3 of the processor 
(see Fig. 1). The crystal can 
be from 1 to 6 MHz, A 3,57- 
MHz color-burst crystal is 
recommended because of 
its availability and low cost. 

In order to ensure proper 
start-up, the chip contains a 



reset circuit that holds the 
processor in a known state 
until power is stable. The 
chip must stay reset for at 
least 50 milliseconds. This is 
accomplished by capacitor 
C3 on pin 4 of the CPPI. 
When power is applied, the 
capacitor will hold this line 
iow. An internal pull-up re- 
sistor will then start charging 
the capacitor. When the ca- 
pacitor reaches a high level, 
the processor function will 
start. 

The processor at this time 
will set the I/O ports up per 
its internal program. It will 
then start testing the start 
button for a closure (pulled 
to ground). When a valid 
switch closure is recognized, 
the program will next test 
switch SI to see if it is open 
or closed. 

Switch SI determines 
which table is to be exe- 
cuted (see Tables 1 and 2). If 
switch SI is open. Table 1 
will be selected. If switch SI 
is closed, Table 2 will be 
utilized^ 

Next, the processor will 
test switch S2 to determine 
which subgroup to run. 
There are a total of 8 sub- 
groups per selected group. 
Seven require that one of 
the pins, 28 through 34, be 
pulled to ground through 
switch S2. The eighth group 
is selected when all eight 
pins are open. 




i 



Photo B. The inside top panel of the CPP1. 



Upon determining which 
subgroup has been selected, 
the processor will start send- 
ing at the rate of the dot 
clock, IC2. All timing is based 
on the dot clock. 

The processor will send 
out a short pulse from pin 35 
of the CPPI to fire the one- 



shot (IC2). It will then test 
pin 1 for it to time out. This 
is one dot time For dashes, 
it will do this three times. 

The tone is generated by 
IC3, a simple 500-Hz tone 
generator. Pin 36 of the 
CPPI will go to a high level 
whenever the tone is on; it 



S2A dosed 
E I S H 5 U F 

S2D closed 

C ; X / — M G 



S1 Open 

S2B closed 

T N D B6 - KY 

S2E closed 

L W P J 1 . " 



S2C closed 

?2 V34 A R 

S2F closed 
Z 7 O 9 8 : Q , 



[-hyphen; ? question mark; () parentheses; rsemfcoton; /fraction 
bar; —break; .period; " quotation mark; : colon; ,connnna] 

S2G closed 

E?LTZ I2WN() SVPD7 J0T1A H3BCJ 654.X KUAIO YFR"M ,GVK9 
A;JQ— /80EL >Z8I Z07JX OM9— L fTNDC .1"KQ EBLWP B4ARV 
J0Z?2 V35UF G;8-E 1SH6K Y,A/: XLCQP V2FEK :J~DK WR?U- 
6/79N "LAZ5 8HAM{) TlB4a 3;S,Z 01.EB JVGIY 

S2H closed 

Electronic Keyer Option 

Practice Groups With Morse Code Pattern 



S2A closed 


S2B closed 


S2C closed 


E 


T 


- 


9 


■ ■"^^ ■* 


\ 


N 


■ 


2 


■ ■ ~ ~ 


S 


D 


■ ■ 


V 


" n 


H 


B 


T- r ■ 


3 


p»i 


5 


6 


■ ■ ■ ■ 


4 


*»«* 


U 


— 


■ 1-1 


A 


.- 


F 


K 
Y 


-^^-=- 


R 


■■ 4 


S2D closed 


S2E closed 


52F ctosed 


----- 


L 


*■ W* 


Z 


■ * 


c 


W 


,. 


7 


■ -r + 


■ 


P 


^ . 


O 





X 


J 


p"^ ■""■"" 







/ 


1 


■>. ^-^^ 


9 


— . 


— ^ — .^.^ 


• 


w m * 


8 


■¥ 



M 
G 



Table 1. 

73 Magazine • July, 1983 13 




ill 



U2 




R6 



XTAL - 



C3 — 



■ce- 

■04' 








y3 



I 1 



m ^ _ ^ ^ 

■^ ■*■ a IE oc 



Re- 



-ftf 

02- 



II 



E) 



S-i-T^rGFEOCBASI 
fi tc ^ o 

« ? S 



m 



fig. 3, Circuit board, foil side. 



Fig. 4. Circuit board showing parts p!acemer}t 



goes tow to turn it off. To 
stop the sequence, pin 6 of 
the CPPl must be pulled to 
ground through the stop 
button. (It should be noted 
that the start and stop but- 
tons can be either normally- 
open push-buttons, as shown 
in Fig, 1, or toggle switches.) 
At this time, the processor 
will start testing the start 



pin again, except in the key- 
er mode. 

In the keyer mode (switch 
SI and S2 open), when the 
start is pressed, the chip will 
enter the keyer mode. To 
leave it, the power must 
be turned ofl This is to 
eliminate any chance of 
the keyer going out during 
transmission. 



Construction 

Assembly is very straight- 
forward. The circuit can be 
hand^wired in about an hour 
or two. or a simple single- 
sided PC board can be used 

The crystal should be lo- 
cated as close as possible to 
the CPPl. This is standard 
for any microprocessor 

C7 must not be left out. 









SI Cfosed 


S2A closed 


. 








HEFSU 51EUH 


H5EIF 


USH5H 


I5SFE 


EI5S5 


FUI6E StFHE 


5UESH 


HEFIU 


FEH5I 


USEFI 


S26 closed 










B-YTD N6KBY 


-KTD6 


TYNKD 


BKNT^ 


DY6D- 


BN-TB KYTDN 


6-KYD 


D6YTK 


YBTND 


K6NYT 



FEIHS 



SUI5F 



UEFHE 



TBDKT YKTND 



-6KYK 



S2C closed 

V4R2A ?3R42 A?VR3 24 V A? 3A?V3 A23?3 24RAV RRVV? 43?4A 

V?A23 RAV42 3R2V4 AyR?2 V4R2V ?RV42 



S2D dosed 












X;OGC /--MXG 


OXGCM 


M/XM-- 


;CO--x 


CGM— X 


GXCVi- 


;— X/G X/OM; 


MXCGM 


— X;C/ 


eM/;G 


CXM— G 


M;/(PC 


S2E closed 












J.LtP 'WPJt 


LW1.- 


L1JWP 


PJWL 


Pt "PL 


U.WW 


J "LWP UWPt 


•J PL 


1PWJL 


U-'PI 


WIJP 




S2F closed 












0:.ZO 7980: 


ZQ087 


09:3 


,OQ9Z 


a:78Z 


ZQ8,9 


(I7ZO. ZOQ9; 


Q,9:Z 


9027i 


020:9 


807.0 




S2G closed 












92837 465 !(» 


49628 


537a9 


96821 


13579 


25680 


53751 












S2H closed 












:.— -/ -:0?. 


nm''^ 

-1" 


0%: 


-__7 


?-(>/: 


■m 



- QMGXQ 



LPJ1W ,W11J 



,80:Q 



r9Q90 



95062 



13457 



"*~"~i •llti* 



?'-.J 



0*/-? 



Table Z 



This stabilizes the power to 
the chip when the tone is on 
If it IS left out it is possible 
that the internal program 
will jump out of sequence 

Custom tailoring the 
CPPl to your particular 
needs can also be done. 
Some examples are: 

• replacing the speed con- 
trol with a rotary switch with 
fixed resistors, 

• replacing R9 with a poten- 
tiometer for tone control, 
and 

• adding a volume control 
These are just a few of the 
many variations possible. 

Operation 

The CPPl is extremely 
easy to use. Apply power. 
Set switch 51 to the appro- 
priate practice table. Set 
switch S2 to the desired sub- 
group. Press start and adjust 
speed- That's it! 

Your selected practice 
group will cycle until stop is 
pressed- At this time, anoth- 
er practice group can be 
selected. Speed may be ad- 
justed any time. 

To use the keyer function, 
set both switches SI and S2 
to the open position Then 
press start. You are now in 
the keyer mode. 

When pin 37 is brought to 
ground, a series of dots will 
be sent. When pin 38 is 
brought to ground, a series 
of dashes will be sent. Fi- 
nally, when both pins 37 



14 73 Magazine • July, 1983 



A microthin, synthesized, 
programmable, sub-audible 
tone encoder that fits inside 
the ICOIVI IC-2AT. 

Need we say more? 

$2995 / 



IC- I OT _ 
H soil 




:j?^f:f^ 



r>c 19513 I 



r 



^AJi. 



«i 





COMMUNICATIONS 
SPECIAUS7S .« 

426 West Taft Avenue. Orange. CA 92667 
800/864-0547 California: 714/998-3021 




Photo C Adding a key turns the CPP1 into an iambic keyer. 



and 38 are held to ground, 
alternating dots and dashes 
will be sent. 



A final operating note 
concerning speed: Selecting 
the proper speed for prac- 



tice may be done in one of 
two ways. The simplest way 
is counting dots. This is 
accomplished by setting the 
CPP1 to the keyer mode and 
pressing start. Hold the dot 
input line low and count the 
dots for one second. Once 
the number of dots per sec- 
ond has been determined, 
it is a simple case of cal- 
culating the speed by the 
following formula: speed 
(wpm) = 2.4 X dots/see. For 
example, if 5 dots are 
counted in one second, 
then speed = 2.4X5 dots/ 
sec = 12 wpm. 

The second hriethod is 
based on a known fixed re- 
sistor value. Since all timing 
is based on a dot time, it is a 
simple matter of using the 
following formula for deter- 



mining the one-shot time: 
dot = rix(R6 + R7)XC8. 

Conclusion 

Learning Morse code, or 
increasing one's speed, has 
been a problem since the 
early days of ham radio. 
Learning Morse code should 
be fun and easy. However, 
traditional means using 
tapes and records generally 
make it less than desirable. 

The CPP1 puts learning 
Morse code into the comput- 
er age without the hassle. 
Using the CPP1 makes learn- 
ing code fun and easy. Using 
this device 15 or 20 minutes 
a day, followed by listening 
to actual ham conversations 
for about the same amount 
of time, will make code learn- 
ing exciting and rewarding. ■ 



QTY 

1 
2 



IC1 
IC2, IC3 



ICs 

CPP1 code practice processor 
NE555 timer 







Capacitors 


2 


C1,C2 


22 pF ceramtc 


1 


C3 


1 uF, 10 V dc 


3 


C4, C6 


.01 uF 


2 


C5, C6 


.1 uF 


1 


C9, C7 


lOOuF, lOVdc 
Resistors 


g 


R1-R5, R8-R9 


15k, V4 Watt 


1 


R6 


220k, Va Watt 


1 


H7 


2 meg potentiometer 
Miscellaneous 


2 


D1, D2 


1N914or equivaient 


1 


S1 


SPDT toggle switch 


1 


S2 


8-positton rotary switch 


2 


S3. S4 


normally-open push-buttons 


1 


crystal 


1-6 MH2 (3.57 MHz nominal) 


1 


speaker 


8-Ohm speaker 
Keyer Option 


1 


R12 


4Jk, V* Watt 


1 


Q1 


2N3904 or equivalent 



Parts List 

The CPP1 code practice processor chip Is available 1rom Mi- 
cro Digital Technology, PO Box 1139, Mesa A2 85201, for 
$19.95 ppd., PCB, $5.00. Checks, Visa, and Mastercard ac- 
cepted. On credit card orders, please include card number, ex- 
piration date, telephone number, and full name. For phone or- 
ders, call (602> 897-2534. OEM and dealer inquiries welcome. 
Complete parts kits available from the following distributors: 



Greenbrier Marketing 
International, Inc. 
509 S. 48th St., Suite 105 
Tempe AZ 85201. 
Price: $49.95 postpaid. 

Circuit Specialists 
PO Box 3047 
Scottsdale AZ S5287 
{800)'528-1417 



Ghaney Electronics 
PO Box 27038 
Denver CO 80227 
(303K81-5750 

Rddiokit 
Box 411 

Greenville NH 03048 
$47.00 (kit) 



Gigatech* 

9520 Chesateake Dr. 

San Diego CA 92123 

(714>268^8131 

*will be selling completed 
units in addition to kits. 



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Commercial Exhibits • Flea Market * ARRL Booth 
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SendSASE: G Frieders, W9ZGP, 1501 Molitor Road, Auwfu. II 60505 

Dealers Ccintact^ G. R. Isely, WD9GIG 

736 Fellows Street 
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16 73 Magazine • July, 1983 



The BEST is still 
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preamp 



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(2W = 45W. 5W = 90W) RX prfeamp 

C22 2iV in = 20W out 189.95 

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P,0 Box 1393, GiIroy4CA 95020 (408) 84Y 1857 



73 Magazine • July. 19&3 17 



The State of the Art Simplex Interconnect 

Communications Electronics Specialties introduces the CES 510SA 
"Smart" Simplex Autopatch, with many important new features never 
available before: • Three digit control codes with user programming. 
• A sophisticated toll restrict provides positive long distance lock out. 
• Time-out and COR activity timers with warning beeps and digital pro- 
gramming, • Rotary or DTMF dialing. ♦ Phone line in- use detector prevents 
interrupting a call in progress, and sends unique CW sequence. • Phone ring 
detection logic enables unique CW sequence. • Digital programming of the sample 
rate and width, and noise gate sensitivity control, for easy interfacing with most radios. 
Simple and direct connections to radio. 

Options available: • Smart CW identifier with unique CW messages for each patch lunction. 
• FCC type accepted phone line coupler. • Special tone squelch kit to operate patch through 
repeaters. 





C^B 


^ PTJLA/fft 


N[}JHf 


PTT 


cn^)^J^r:T iHiiiii 


i 


# 


• 


• 


• 


^"^ 







smnnr 


prircHi|^^MIH| 




^^BHK 


n=rr"" 




H 




■ 


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18 73 Magazine • July, 1983 



^s^m 





JDL Leads Again 

The Sa1ijm-15 XHP, an engineering break- 
through from JOt laboratories, has new State-of- 
the- Art technology never before rncorporated in 
amateur band general microwave receivers. This 
technology increases reception from distances 
never before achieved. By designing totally new 
cfrcuttry, and using new ultra-sensitive compo* 
nents. coupled with a precfsion tuned 30 inch 
receiving dish^ a system gain of 68 decibles 
makes the Saturn-15 XHP the leader in micro- 
wave receivers. In field tests, the Saturn-IS XHP 
recefved clear, crisp pictures, where other units 
tested were snowy. During these tests the 
SatufH'IB XHP's highly sensitive downconverter 
probe was able to receive a color picture with- 
out a dish. No other unit tested could pass this 
test. 

Free Movies for You 

That's right! Free movres. sports, and speciaf 
events, 24 hours a day and all commercial free. 
The Satyrn-15 XHP super deep fringe microwave 
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homeowners TV mast, you too can receive 
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The Saturn-is XHP comes compfete with a 30 
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Information for your Area 

By calling our itiformatlon number (916) 454-2190 
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A Very Special Introductory Offer!!!! 

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73 Magazine • July, 1983 19 



Kinti Jenkins-Smith VK9NL 
PO Box 90 
Nariotk i stand 
AuUrdim 2B99 



The True Story 
Behind Heard Island 

Fighting bad weather, shady ship owners, and bad press, 
the HIDXA expedition forged its way to the DXer's dream 

But getting there was only half the battle. 



The idea of a possible 
DXpedilion to Heard Is- 
land came to )im VK9NS 
while he was still P29JS and 
living in Papua New Cuin- 
ea. Heard Island, in the 
southern Indian Ocean, is 
situated in one of the 
world's stormiest seas, unin- 
habited, inhospitable, and 
not really "en route" to any- 



where. So the only way to 
get there would be to catch 
a lift or charter a vessel for 
the voyage, The vessel 
would have to be sturdy 
and suitable, with an experi- 
enced skipper for those 
waters. The cost for such a 
lengthy trip would be high, 
but if the money could be 
found, such a DXpedition 



could take place. So the 
Heard Island DX Associa- 
tion (HIDXA) was formed 
early in 1980, and the long 
and stormy road to Heard 
Island commenced. 

Assistance was asked for. 
and many an amateur con- 
tributed. Jim, in his dealings 
with the authorities, met 
with goodwill and interest 




Preparing for departure. 



from all concerned, A set of 
guidelines was formulated 
for private expeditions visit- 
ing Heard Island, and he got 
permission to visit, pending 
a firm proposal. License for 
Heard Island was issued 
"VK©JS. 

Meanwhile, the hunt for a 
suitable vessel was on, and 
word was out for interested 
operators. The season for 
visiting Heard Island is very 
short, involving January 
through March of each year 
A vessel was in fact found 
for the 1981 season, but the 
enormous cost involved 
could not be met at the 
time, and this very suitable 
charter and experienced 
skipper had to be aban- 
doned. 

Unfortunately. HIDXA 
was now ted astray by prom- 
ises regarding a West Aus- 
tralian shipping firm who 
said that thev intended to 
send a fishing-survey ship to 
Heard Island waters in the 
1981 season and would lake 
a group of amateur radio 
operators along for a rea- 
sonable sum of money This 
proposal sounded just too 
good to be true, and of 
course, as we all know, it 
tumed out to be just that 



20 ISMagazirre • July, 1983 





Equipment and stores in the hold of Cheyoes II. 



Months of not knowing and 
bein^i put off with "we wilt 
know for sure next week" 
persisted until the season 
was over. During 1981, it 
was a continuation of "next 
week for sure/' regarding 
plans for 1982, until it be- 
came clear that "next week'' 
would never come We 
heard that Dr. Lewis might 
be going to Heard Island on 
the Dick Snnith Explorer in 
1982 and we had berths 
booked on that ship should 
thev be headed that way. As 
it turned out^ they went to 
Antarctica instead 

So the hunt for a vessel 
for 1983 went on, The prob- 
lem was mainly financial. 
People do not really want to 
give money to a project 
which is not 100% guaran* 
teed Money might be prom- 
ised after the expedition, 
but shipowners want pay* 
ment in advance. So we 
were really faced with a sort 
of "catch 22/' 

Now came the surprising 
news that IDXF and NCDXF 
had pledged $20,000 in 
order to send 2-3 operators 
along with a group of moun* 
taineers who were planning 
an expedition to Heard 
Island to climb Big Bea At 
the same time, concentrat- 
ed efforts to discredit 
HIDXA and statements that 
Jim would never go to 
Heard Island and had no in- 
tention of even trying began 
to appear on the bands. Jim 
had always stated that if the 
expedition did not take 
place; he would refund do- 



nations, Four out of 300-odd 
persons who had donated to 
HIDXA asked for their 
money back: so it goes to 
show that most people do 
not take as gospel truth 
whatever they hear on the 
grapevine. 

Sojo VK0SI spent Easter 
of 1982 on Norfolk Island. 
He and Jim spent long days 
working on the Heard Island 
project, SoJo proved himself 
to be just what we needed 
most — someone with know- 
how, interest, and "get up 
and go." He went back to 
Tasmania and started look- 
ing for a vessel. Jim was 
reluctant to go on the air 
and say "we are going in 
1983" until he was fairly cer- 
tain that this time it would 
happen. So it was not until 
early September of 1982, 
when the contract with Ihe 
owners of the ex-whale- 
chaser Cbeynes tl had been 
signed, that we could really 
start our publicity cam- 
paign. We sent out masses 
of brochures, "stuffers/' and 
letters. Now that the vessel 
was secured, it was smooth 
sailing ahead. The beauty of 
this contract was that the 
vessel was big enough to 
take up to 20 passengers. So, 
if we could find even 10-12 
people with other interests, 
and 6-8 operators, with all 
of us paying $3000 out of 
our own pockets, we could 
pay nearly the whole char- 
ter cost. 

Universities were in- 
formed of this chance to 
visit Heard Island and adver- 




}inn and Tonn VK6MK in Albany. 



tisements were placed in 
several Australian newspa- 
pers. Gradually, the team 
started to take shape. A firm 
proposal to the government 
was drawn up. This was sev- 
eral pages long since it had 
to include details of all per- 
sonnel, equipment, landing 
gear, supplies, etc. But once 
submitted, it did not take 
long for the official blessing 
to come through in writing. 

Meanwhile, on the bands, 
word had it still that we 
would never go and were 
just daydreaming, that the 
ship was a floating coffin, it 
was no good, etc. Some of 
the DX outlets took the trou- 
ble to print some of the ma- 
terial we had sent along, but 
others must have filed it 
straight into the wastepaper 
basket since their publica- 
tions were quite innocent of 
any mention of HIDXA. 
IDXF and NCDXF, on the 
other hand, were never out 
of the news[ 

There was talk of ''the 
race to Heard Island'' in 
those publications in which 
we did rate a mention. It was 
of course never a race. It 
was a matter of two groups, 
with different objectives, 
going more or less at the 
same time. We were just 
continuing what Jim had 
started in 1980. No doubt 
the mountaineering group 
had also been planning for 
some time, but without 
amateur-radio involvement, 
the world of ham radio 
would not know Heard Is- 
land was high on the ''want- 



ed" list and you could prob- 
ably put five successive 
groups on the island, all of 
whom would work tremen- 
dous pileups. For goodness 
sake, we work endless piJe- 
ups from Norfolk Island 
where there are 6 licensed 
resident amateurs! So this 
"race'' idea was a bit silly. 
One publication topped 
that by advising its readers 
to "put their money" on 
IDXF/NCDXF, as if we were 
horses. It passes all under- 
standing, for sure 

We got a lot of support 
from individual amateurs rn 
many countries, and we re- 
ceived a lot of encouraging 
letters with the cItKiations, 
so we knew we had the sup- 
port of the individual ama- 
teur Some of the small DX 
clubs also contributed, but 
the big clubs did not come 
forward; an approach to 
NCDXF proved futile. The 
lack of publicity left many 
in doubt as to our intentions. 
When we received $100 
from LIDXA, it was with a 
stern request to send the 
money back should the ex- 
pedition not take place. We 
had already paid $6700 as a 
deposit on the Cheynes li, 
but they received our mon- 
ey-back guarantee in writing. 

The cost of an expedition 
to such a place as Heard Is- 
land is immense. Apart from 
the remainder charter cost 
which was paid by the ex- 
peditioners themselves, 
HIDXA had to find money 
for fuel, landing gear, food, 
generators, tents, tarpaulins, 

73 Magazine • July. 1983 21 



I 




Do we go on or don't we? Chief Mate and Skipper make the 
decision, 



gas cookers, gas, and a num- 
ber of bits and pieces A suit- 
able first-aid kit and supply 
of pharmaceuticals had to 
be provided. Rigs and anten- 
nas were mostly on loan, but 
with a guarantee to return or 
replace them if lost, thus re- 
quiring expensive insurance 
in addition to the freight 
cost It made me wonder 
about certain people's sani- 
ty when I heard inane re* 
marks about "going on an 
expedition to get rich," The 
idea that a green stamp with 
a QSL card is clear profit 
and it costs nothing to mail 
a card back is fondly be- 
lieved by some people. 

Life became very busy 
from September through 
December, Jim left for Tas- 
mania in November to be on 
the spot for all the last-min- 
ute arrangements that had 
to be made I remained on 
Norfolk Island to handle in* 



coming correspondence and 
hold the fort We kept in 
touch via radio or tele- 
phone, but with everything 
else on our minds, we both 
forgot our wedding anniver- 
sary on December 5; 2 years 
—you would think we had 
been married for 20. 

I arrived in Tasmania on 
December 29 Those last 
few days before departure 
were very hectic. What with 
the holiday season and all 
the festivities, it seemed im- 
possible to organize the fi- 
nal details, and departure 
had to be postponed for a 
couple of days. The rest of 
the team had already ar- 
rived. We were 17 people, 
including 5 scientists, 5 
mountaineers, a journalist, 
and a cinecameraman. A 
mixed group for sure, but as 
it turned out, a very bal- 
anced group. We all got on 
w^ell with each other Maybe 






^jr.'A J 




Battling headwinds on the way to Heard Island. 



Peter VKhVR, Walter OE1LO. Kirsti VK9NL So/o VK0Sh 
Bernie VK6KL and Walt W7SE at Albany. 

22 73MagazinB • Juiy, 1983 



the fact that each and every 
one of the exped it toners was 
required to pay $3000 en- 
sured that no one who was 
not very strongly motivated 
and did not really want to go 
to Heard Island was includ* 
ed in the expedition We 
could have filled the ship 
with people who wanted to 
come for nothing, but our 
policy did not permit any 
freeloaders who might 
cause arguments and back- 
biting if the going got rough 
A very wise move as it 
turned out. 

Our troubles should now 
have been over, but this was 
not to be. We departed 
Hobart January 4 and struck 
a strong gale immediately. 
After battling ahead for 24 
hours, the skipper advised 
that due to the high rate of 
fuel consumption and slow 
progress, we should return 
to Hobart to await more rea- 
sonable weather. Turning 
around in those mountain- 
ous seas was a frightening 
experience. The Cheynes II, 
which had been tossing 
around violently for hours 
already, now laid over mo- 
mentarily to a 40*^ angle 
which sent everything 
crashing and broke the lash- 
ings on the two dinghies 
stowed on the foredeck. 
During the night, a wave had 
shot up under the boat deck 
and knocked a 3" plank 
clean out, so it was a slightly 
battered Cheynes 11 that re- 
turned to Hobart the follow- 
ing morning. 

We now had three days of 



hanging around Hobart, 
impatiently waiting for the 
weather to improve. It did 
improve somewhat, but we 
still stayed with no explana- 
tion forthcoming. Finally, 
we were scheduled to leave 
on Sunday morning, but Sat- 
urday evening we learned 
that departure had been 
postponed once again since 
the skipper/owner had de- 
cided not to come with us A 
new skipper was found, and 
on Sunday afternoon. Cap- 
tain Laurin MacEwan ar- 
rived and we were off again. 
The southern route was 
abandoned. We Look a west- 
eriy course while the skipper 
made himself familiar with 
the vessel He soon found 
that the fuel consumption 
was alarmingly high It bore 
no relationship to facts and 
figures quoted on our deal- 
ings with the company. In 
fact. Captain MacEwan 
found that we could not go 
to Heard Island from Ho- 
bart. The ship just did not 
have the range, in spite of all 
the expert advice and calcu- 
lations which had been done 
by professionals The only 
thing to do now was either 
to cancel the expedition or 
go to Albany, in western 
Australia, to refuel and 
make Heard Island from 
there. Naturally, we alt 
agreed it would have to be 
Albany, There was no ques- 
tion of the ship not having 
the range for that distance. 
The mystery of the fuel 
consumption followed us all 
the way. Tanks were dipped 




Our home on Heard Island 



and charts consulted. Noth- 
ing seemed to add up It was 

a worry for several days be- 
fore they thought they had 
the problem licked. 

We continued our voyage 
after refueling in Albany, 

and for some days every- 
thing ran smoothly. We set- 
tled down to a routine for 
shipboard life. All expedi- 
tioners were rostered for 
duty in the galley or on the 
bridge. Three would do the 
cooking, with cooks chang- 
ing each day, and normal 
4-hour watches were kept on 
the bridge, around the 
clock. The expeditioners got 
to know each other and the 
crew of 8, and with so many 
people with different back- 
grounds and experiences, 
there was always a lot to 
talk about 

Unfortunately, one of the 
operators, Walt W7SE, 
found it necessary to with- 
draw from the expedition in 
Albany, By then we were al- 
ready so much delayed that 
he just could not risk further 
delays which would make 
him late back for work. An- 
other scientist joined us in 
Albany so the number of 
people remained the same 

!t now became apparent 
that we did not have enough 
water on board for the 
boilers. This was another 
mystery, but nevertheless a 
fact We were supposed to 
carry 170 tons of water, but 
in fact, had only about 80 
tons, another reason why 
the vessel did not have the 
range. The only thing to do 



now was to call in at 
Kerguelen Islands to take on 
water. This would cost us ex- 
tra fuel which we could ill 
afford. Arrangements were 
made with the owner that he 
would meet us on the way 
back with the necessary fuel 
to take us back to port in 
Australia, 

Thus, we made a stop at 
Kerguelen. The French were 
kind and helpful. It seemed 
to us that we had been at 
sea for a lifetime, when in 
fact, it had been just two 
weeks since Albany. We had 
a lot to learn yet[ The 
French invited us all ashore 
for lunch, and we savored 
every morsel of that meal. 
There was of course no 
chance of operating from 
Kerguelen. It was an un- 
planned-for port of c^ll, and 
the necessary license could 
only have been issued in 
Paris, well in advance. In 
any case, we stayed only a 
few hours, so time woufd 
not have permitted oper- 
ating from there. 

Once again the expe- 
dition nearly came to a full 
stop. The Cheynes il dragged 
anchor and we could hardiv 
believe our eyes when we 
dismally observed her drift- 
ing onto the rocks. It was 
very fortunate that nothing 
vital was damaged and we 
w^ere able to continue on to 
Heard Island 

Finally, on February 5, 
there it was: Heard island. 
We arrived in rain and mist, 
but it was reasonably calm, 
so unloading commenced 




VKOfS shack 



right away. Plans for landing 
equipment and personnel 
had been made during the 
voyage. All gear and food 
had been wrapped securely 
in plastic and seal€?d, so off- 
loading went smoothly. We 
had had breakfast at 4:30 
am in order to make an early 
start 

Now began a back-break- 
ing day. We had two Arbec 
huts for our use. The scien- 
tists and film crew settled in- 
to the one closest to the 
beach, and the hams had the 
other, smaller one up the 
hill, These huts are mere 
shells of unlined metal. 
They are completely devoid 
of furniture or amenities. 
But, they were wcUer[)roaf 
even if somewhat drafty, 
Our hut was about .500 
meters away and every bit 
of equipment, antennas, 
food, gas. cookers, yenera- 
tors, etc, had to be hand- 
carried all the way from the 
beath The trips to and fro 







were many, and I think we 
had all reached the stum- 
bling stage by the end of the 
day. It rained; the black vol- 
canic sand stuck to every* 
thing and the path was 
rocky and uneven. Finally, 
the beach was empty and 
we could think about get- 
ting a rig on the air and see 
about sleeping space and 
something to eat. 

It was dusk by now. Our 
hut did not have a door. In 
spite of the rain which now 
came in torrents, the icy 
wind in the doorway, and 
the cramped conditions in- 
side the hut, we got our* 
selves into some sort of 
order. Bob got one of the 
generators going and with a 
vertical antenna he was 
ready to open up from 
Vm\ 5. His first QSO went to 
ZS6IW. He worked some 
Europeans, but with the rain 
pouring down onto the un- 
protected generator, there 
suddenly was a power surge 




The day the sun came out: Big Ben. 

73 Magazine • July. 1983 23 




Tarpaulins made makeshift sails for the Cheynes \l 



which put a stop to opera- 
tions. We all retired to our 
sleeping bags. Being utterly 
exhausted, we slept ex- 
tremely well, 

I was the first one awake 
the next morning finn, Sojo, 
and Bob IcHjked like three 
blue elephant seals in their 
sleeping bags It had stopped 
raining, and soon we were 
all busy putting up more an* 
tennas, making the hut more 
livable, and getting properly 
organized. A 3-element ten- 
meter beam and a 3-element 
15 -meter beam were un- 
packed and erected without 
any trouble We had brought 
a Minooka Special for 160 
meters, but unfortunately, 
even with alt expeditioners 
lending a hand, putting up 
this huge vertical proved 
too much in the strong wind. 
She bent beyond repair and 
had to be abandoned. The 
TH3 tri bander was the last 
one to go up. complete with 
rotor. The other beams had 
a hand-operated turning ar- 
rangement. One of the tents 

24 73 Magazine • July, 19&3 



was put up to house the gen- 
erators, and inside the hut, 
I im hung other tents to keep 
some of the draft out, the fi- 
nal one being hung in the 
doorway to act as a door. 
We had four rigs ready for 
use and had brought spare 
rigs just in case. 

A solar flare made radio 
conditions extremely poor. I 
suppose we were lucky it 
did not put a full stop to 
propagation for the duration 
of our stay, but it was very 
unfortunate that it had to 
happen at all. We worked. 
One of us would monitor 
the bands and call CQ regu- 
larly. If there was an open- 
ings we knew about it and 
made the most of it Open- 
ings sometimes tasted only a 
tew minutes, but after a tew 
days, we found that 20 me- 
ters was usually open to 
America in the eaHy morn- 
ing hours, Europe was 
around in the evenings, and 
Asia and Pacific at odd 
times during the day. Night- 
time was a bit unpredict- 



able, but we kept watch on 
the bands around the clock 

We were now joined by 
Walter OE1LO. who had 
been helping the mountain- 
eers get started on their 
climb up Big Ben on a new 
route from Mechanics Bay, 
With the poor band condi- 
tions, we were more than 
enough operators, and some 
of us actually just sat idle 
most of the day. So) o was in 
charge of a! I RTTY and SSTV 
gear and made the first QSO 
ever from Heard Island on 
these two modes He also 
made the first satellite QSO 
from Heard Island. So, by 
making use of every little 
opening, the number of 
QSOs crept up, VKOjS made 
about 12,400 QSOs. with 
VK0NL making about 2000. 
This was not a bad score in 
poor conditions 

The Anaconda It opera- 
tors were also active. This 
meant that only one of our 
stations could operate on 
whatever band happened to 
be open. If V'K(DCW was on 
20 meters CW, then we 
could only be on 20 meters 
SSB instead of having one 
station on CW and one on 
SSB. This, of course, applied 
to the other group as well. 

Bob took charge of the 
generators. He kept them 
going, serviced them, re- 
fueled, and did some re- 
pairs. None of us got a tre- 
mendous lot of steep The 
shack was noisy, cold, and 
cramped. But the days 
passed quickly We were 
more or less self<:ontained 
in our hut, being able to do 
the basic cooking there and 
not having to leave the 
bands to turn up for meals in 
the other hut. Not very 
sociable, but time did not 
allow for socializing In fact, 
when the other three ladies 
of the expedition were in- 
vited aboard the Anaconda 
ft for dinner one evening, 1 
was not even asked. At least 
I like to think that this was 
because everyone knew the 
hams were too busy to so- 
cialize! {It could have been 
those shapeless oilskins 
combined with my ad- 



vanced years, of course.) 

So we worked. The scien- 
tists took samples from pen- 
guins, counted them, mea- 
sured temperatures on rocks 
and under rocks, collected 
samples of this and that, and 
generally had a very suc- 
cessful time on the island. 
The mountaineers climbed 
their new route towards the 
summit of Big Ben, keeping 
in touch by VHP skeds twice 
daily. The film crew fifmed 
everyone and everything 
and will have an excellent 
documentarv^ of the whole 
fantastic voyage and stay on 
the island, to be released 
on Australian TV in June/ 
July, 1983. It IS expected 
that this film will also be 
released overseas in due 
course. 

We had hoped to extend 
our stay a few more days, 
but due to the precarious 
fuel situation on the 
Cheynes //, this could not 
be. So we were due to de- 
part February 15 at 16tX) In 
preparation for this, we start- 
ed to carry some things to 
the beach, intending to keep 
one rig on the air till the bit- 
ter end. However, the wind 
was quite strong, and by 
lunchtime, a full storm blew 
up. This was the Heard Is- 
land we had feared. Atlas 
Cove boiled; sea spray was 
blown far inland. Ashore, 
the black volcanic sand 
whipped and blasted The 
Anaconda It operators tost 
their beam, the mast just 
buckled effortlessly. It be- 
came clear that departure 
was impossible and we 
made our way down to the 
beach to make sure the gear 
already there was secure. 
Here, we found that the seas 
were rising and everything 
had to be moved further 
up — an enormous task in 
that wind. Gusts were mea- 
sured up to 80 knots and 
some of us were literally 
blown off our feet At one 
stage, I was sent flying and 
ended up underneath the 
tarpaulin which we used 
to cover the goods. The 
Cheynes // had to get up 
steam to keep from drifting 



m 



ICOM 





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EX-243 Electronic keyer unit 

Fl'44 SSS filter (2nd IF) ....„ 

FL-45 500 H2 CW filter (ht IF] 

Ft 54 270 Hz CW filter (1st IF) 

Fl-52 500 Hz CW filter (2nd [Fl,... 

n^53 250 Hz CW ftltef (2nd IF).... 

MB-12 Mobtle mount ,..« 

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fC-730 B^bsM 200w PEP Xcvt w/mic. 

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IX- 195 Mifker unit,**...„-„.,„*,, 

IX- 202 LDA interface: 730/2KL/AH 

EX-203 150 Hi CWaydiofiHer,. 

EX'205 Transwerter switching unit,., 

HM-IO ^lo bite scan microphone, 

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IC-720A 9-t%and XcvrAMO MHz Acvr $ 

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rL'j4 j.c nJiZ nfft * liter <.»■.«>«>■««,,,,« 

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FU53A 250 Hz CW filter „ 

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AcceBiones: 72Q/7W740 

PS- 15 External 20A power sapply....... 

EX-144 Adaptor, CFl/ PS' 15.. 

CF'l Coolrng fan for PS- 15.. 

PS-20 20A switching ps w/speaker 

CC-1 Adaptor. HF radio to PS- 20 

CF-1 Cttrfrng fan lor PS 20 ,.. 

SII-5 8 pm eleclret desk mit. ......*.... 

$P-3 External speaker 

Speaker/pht^ne patch specify radk))...... 

AT- 100 lOOn 8-band automatic ant tuner 
AT-500 500w B-t^and automatic ant tuner 
AH-1 5'band mobile ani w/tufKr 



$159,00 
20.00 
39,00 
50,00 
159 00 
59,50 
47,50 
96.50 
96 50 
19,50 
39.50 

$829,00 
59.50 
159.00 
59.50 
39,00 
27 50 
39.00 
29 00 
39 50 
19.50 

1349.00 

sa50 

49.50 

19.50 

11250 

Regular 

TBA 

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Regular 

$149.00 

6 50 

45.00 

229 00 

10.00 

45.00 

39.00 

49.50 

139.00 

349 00 

449 00 

259 00 



149'^ 



129" 



fl9" 



649" 
12r> 



999 



f^ 



SALE 



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134** 



19$*= 



129*5 

3U" 
399*^ 
259" 



Hf linear Ampiifier l?«fular SALE 

IC-2ltl 160-15m/WARC solid stHte linear 179500 1299 




VHF/UHF Muhi-modei : Regular SA L£ 

IC'251A 2m FM/SS8/CW Xcvi /AC ps... $749.00 569^^ 

$50 Factory Rebate until 7 3183 

IC-SSIO sow 6m Xcvf.... .....,., $599 00 599" 

PS-20 20A switching ps/spkr ., 229.00 199" 

CF-1 Cooling fan for PS 20 „ 4500 

EX'106 FM3daptor...„ 12500 112" 

IC-451A 430-440 SSS/FM/CW Xcvr/ps 899,00 769" 
IC-451A/High 440-450 MHz Xcvr/ps 399,00 769" 
AG-1 15(lbpreampJC'451A/45A... 89.00 79^^ 
VHf/UHf FM: Regular SALE 

fC-25A 2m, 25w,up-dn-ttpmic,grnleds $359,00 319" 
IC-25H as above, but 45 watts....,.,,., 389,00 349" 
IC-25A '82 model; 25w.ttpmtc. red leds 34900 289" 
IC^4SA 440 m KCvr, lOw, TTP mic...., 399,00 359" 

lC-22y lOw 2m m non-dtgital Xcvr,.„ $299 00 249** 

EX- 199 Remote frequency seleclof ., 35.00 
VHf/UHf Wu/fi-modes: ReflUiar SALE 

IC-290A 2m FM/SSfi. HP mic. ....... ..$549.00 389" 

IC^290H 25w 2m SSB/fM Xcvr. TTP mic 549.00 485** 

IC 560 lOw 6m SSB/FM/CW Xcvr...... 489.00 439" 

IC-490A lOw 430-440 SSB/FM/CWXcvf 64900 57^* 

VHf/UHf Poasbfei: Regular SALE 

IC-202S 2m p^rt. SSfl Xcvr. 3m PEP $279 00 24^ 

IC-505 S/lOw 6m poft SSfl/CW Xcwr 449.00 395*^ 

BP'IO Internal mead battery pack,.. 79 SO 

eC45 AC charger.... ,.....,..„.. 1250 

11-248 FMunit. .„.. 49,50 

IC-IO leather case., „*,„..* 34,95 

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IC-271A 2m, 25w multtmode TBA 

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RP-3010 440 MHz repeater. ,„,... TBA 




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n*n iOOKHZ'30MKz digiUI receiver.,. 

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2 meten: fiegufar SALE 

IC-2A J5/15W 2m HT/batt/walf cgr $ 239 50 214" 
IC-2AT ,15/l.5w2mHT/batt/cgr/TTP... 269.50 219" 

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IC-3A 220 HT/batt/wall cgr 269 95 229" 

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BP-4 Alkaline battery case 12,50 

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HH-10 Scan mic. 255A/260A/29OA/25A 39 SO 

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Hi-14 Scanmng/TTP mic: 1C-25A/45A. 49 SO 

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73 Msgazme • July. 19M 25 




In oihkins and mittens, doing the dogwatch while under saH. 



onto the rocks, and the skip- 
per told me later that he had 
never before seen the wind 
actuallv blowing big holes 
in the sea the way it did 
that day. 

Things could have been 
worse. The storm could 
have tasted until the 
Cheynes II was out of fuel 
for that matter. As it was, 
she burned up a consider- 
able amount that day and 
the next, but the wind did 
abate and we wer^ finally 
able to get on board on the 
16th at lunchtime. 

It was a hurried, cold, and 
blustery departure, The is- 
land looked extra miserable 
with sleet and snow settling 
on the black hills. The ride 
pyt to the ship was bumpy 
and frightening for those 
who cared. I did not; I was 
exhausted and retired to my 
bunk and refused to come 
out for the remainder of 
the day! 



Heard Island II a unique 
island, black arid white with 
a bit of moss covering some 
of the rocks. There are no in- 
sects to speak of, just a 
wingless fly and a wingless 
moth. Seals and penguins 
are the permanent residents, 
and there are manv birds. 
We found time to go for 
short walks and see the 
sights. One day when the 
weather was very mild with 
sun breaking through, the is- 
land looked beautiful in its 
Own stark way. But the cli- 
mate is miserable. As 1 had it 
explained to me: It is not 
that it gets so cold, it is just 
that it does not get warm 
enough for things to grow. 
There is very little sun — 
mostly rain and mist. With a 
summer temperature around 
+ 5^ C, only 8 vascular 
plants and someriiosses and 
lichen represent the growth 
of millions of years 

I would not mind going 




The Saxon Onward fates us in tow. 
26 73 Magazine • July, 1983 



back some day, but on a 
guaranteed vessel — guaran- 
teed not to run out of fuel 
and to be unsinkable. The 
Cheynes I! is probably very 
close to unsinkabte. She 
proved that she could 
perform some amazing 
feats — standing up on her 
hind legs and laying over on 
her side, all in one quick mo- 
tion. But. ..there was the 
fuel/water problem. I was 
dimfy aware of talk of sails 
and so forth but had been 
too busy to think about it. 
Now it had to be faced. 
After two days steaming, the 
engines were shut down and 
sails were hoisted on the 
foremast. The ''sails" were 
actually our tarpaulins 
which were made fast to 
yardarms welded together 
on board from bits and 
nieces. With no engine, we 
lad no electricity, so the 
emergency steering gear on 
the open afterdeck came in- 
to use. The wheel itself was 
enormous; it took two peo- 
ple to turn it before tlie 
grease worked its way 
through. A compass was laid 
to rest on a lifebelt inside a 
drawer which was tied in 
front of the wheel. A small 
wi rrd sqp]^ above i nd i ca ted 
how the wind was in relation 
to the sails (which we could 
not see], and apprdpriate 
chalk marks on the tiller flat 
showed how much helm we 
had. Thus, 400 tons and 160 
feet of iron steamship be- 
came a square-rigged sailing 
vessel! 

We were still far south 
since this was where the pre- 
vailing wind and current 
could be used to Qur. ad van- 
tage. Sometimes the speed 
was less than 1,5 knots, but 
at other times, we reached a 
stunning 4.5 knots. The alba- 
trosses settled down to pad- 
dling in our wake, and we 
kept studying the foam a- 
longside to try to guess if 
we were moving or not. It 
was very uncomfortable, 
cold, and dark, with watch- 
keeping done on the after- 
deck more frequently now 
since two of us had to be on 
duty each period. 



Incredibly, we inched our 
way ahead. I think the worst 
of it all was the bitter, cold 
wind and the dark. The die- 
sel generator would run for 
3-4 hours each evening to 
charge the batteries on the 
bridge. This was the high- 
light of the day when I 
would rush to our cabin and 
switch on the bed lamp in 
the hope that the warmth 
from the globe would per- 
haps yield a bit of warmth to 
the pillow before bedtime. 

After 13 days of this, the 
boilers were fired up and the 
engirie restarted, since we 
expected to meet the owner 
with the promised fuel and 
water in a ebuple of days 
time. However, after two 
days steaming, we learned 
that the refueling ship had 
been delayed. This was a 
great disappointment. An- 
other 3 days of sailing, and 
at last, after 855 nautical 
miles under sail, we made 
the rendezvous. Another pie 
in the sky; there was no 
refueling— we were to be 
towed home. A 1000-foot 
line was attached, and we 
continued our cold and dark 
existence for yet another 7 
days although we did not 
have to stand watch on the 
open deck. 

For reasons best known to 
himself, the owner now in- 
structed the skipper to for- 
bid amateur radio on 
Cheynes II He "did not want 
any talk about w^hat was go- 
ing on'' was the comment 
we heard. No other reason 
was given. I am not sure ex- 
actly what it was he did not 
want us to talk about, but it 
seemed pretty silly, since 
anyone could make a Rad- 
com call and talk his 
mouth off to anyone. And 
the news itiedia were inter- 
ested. They even hired a 
plane to come out and see 
for themselves, a couple of 
hundred mites off the coast. 

We had started to run out 
of some foods. The variation 
in meals was not great in the 
end, but we were not in any 
immediate danger of starv- 
ing. It was a matter of look- 






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demodulator, a crystal controlled transmit tone generator, and a 16 LED frequency analyzer type 
tuning indicator, which is very easy to use. 

Driven from a 12 volt supply, the AMT-1 connects to the speaker, microphone and PTT lines of 
an HF transceiver and to the RS-232 serial interface of a personal computer or ASCII terminal. 
All mode control is via ESCAPE and CONTROL codes from the keyboard (or computer 
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73 Magazine • July; 1983 27 



ing at the bright side. For in- 
stance, without butter, mar- 
garine, or cooking oil, wash- 
ing up in sea water became 
mere child's play since we 
had no greasy dishes. And 
with not much to cook, the 
cooking chore became fair- 
ly simple. As the trip was 
supposed to have lasted a 
maximum of 42 days, and 
we had eaten well for 72 
days, I would say that in this 
important area at least 
cafculattons had been liber- 
al Even when we finally 
berthed in Albany, West 
Australia, there were baked 
beans, tinned tomatoes, and 
packet soup left over. We 
could in fact have spent a 
few more days at sea but 
were certainly happy not to 
be obliged to do so. 

During alt our trials the 
group stayed together. The 
mood in the mess room re- 
mained lighthearted and 
cheerful, and no one al- 
lowed him/herself to show 
any short-tempered ill feel- 




Nearly home and relaxing in the sua fim VK9NS, Kirstl 
VK9NL Waiter OEILO. Soio VK0SL and Bob WA8MOA. 



ings which so easily could 
have jeopardized the easy- 
going comradeship which 
reigned In any case, any 
short temper would have 
been caused by minor irri- 
tations and would not have 
been worth showing off. We 
were literaily "all in the 
same boat" and knew it. 

The whole expedition had 
been an uphill battle with 



problems arising one after 

another for months before 
we even left Hobart. To top 
it off, we found that evil 
tongues had been wagging 
on the amateur bands while 



we were oattiing our way 

home. "They have tost the 
logs" was the cry Was there 
no end to it allMim took the 
unprecedented step of hav- 
ing the logs sighted by Tom 



VK6MK, in Albany, as proof 
that we had not lost them. 
Tom subsequently advised 
WIA that the logs were in* 
tact. How can anyone stoop 
so low as to start such 
rumors? Especially someone 
sitting snug and comfort- 
able in his safe home 
thousands of miles away 
from Heard Island or 
Cheynes //? How do they ex- 
plain their "knowledge"? 
The only explanation 1 can 
think of is that someone is 
determined to discredit 
HIDXA at any cost— even at 
the cost of their own honor 
and credibility. Why? What 
are they afraid of? Is ama- 
teur radio a hobby or has it 
become big business? 

The Heard Island and 
Cheynes tl experience was 
no picnic. We did tt because 
we wanted to activate 
Heard Island and had said 
we would do so And as my 
granny used to say: ''What 
does not kill you wilt make 
you stronger!' ■ 



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73 Magazine • July, 1983 29 





§ 



Software Available for Six Computers 




The versatility of the personal com- 
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Hamsoft" or Hamtext'". The inter- 
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Hamsoft" Features 

split Screen Display 

1026 Character Type Ahead Buffer 

10 Message Ports-255 Characters each 

Status Display 

CW-ID from Keyboard 

Centronics Type Printer Compatibility 

CW send/receive 5-99 WPM 

RTTY send/receive 60, 67, 75, 100 WPIVI 

ASCII send/receive 110, 300 Baud 



Hamtext'". our new program, is avail- 
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An Honorable Mention winner in 73 's 
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is a sure cure for the drifting frequency blues. 



Ran Seyer D13NW 
Opiefkamp 74 
1300 Bmumchweig 
federal Republic of German ^ 



Have you ever followed 
the conversation of 
two guys on the same fre- 
quency using identical sev- 
eral-thousand-dollar trans- 
cervers but reading off dif- 
ferent frequencies from 
their digital displays? Or did 



you ever wonder how to es- 
timate the drift of your own 
frequency counter when 
making frequency-drift mea- 
surements on your new rig 
or project just finished? 

Of course, there are vari* 
ous means to overcome 
these problems. Tempera- 
ture-controlled ovens as an 
option for your frequency 
counter, for example, are 
readily available. They will 
give the crystal in your fre- 
quency counter a short-term 




The circuit in actual operation, with the ferrite antenna on 
top of the counter. Output frequency is 10 MHz, phase- 
tocked to a selectable AM-br€>adcast station. 

32 73 Magazine • July, 1983 



frequency stability on the 
order of 0.1 ppm. However, 
they lead to an increasing 
uncertainty about the ac- 
tual accuracy due to the ag- 
ing process in the crys- 
tal—and they cost 50 dol- 
lars or more. 

On the other hand, pre- 
cise frequency reference sig- 
nals are delivered more or 
less free of charge to our 
shacks by the National Bu- 
reau of Standards or by 
means of TV signals syn- 
chronized with a cesium 
standard. 

tt is not to everyone's 
taste, however to deal with 
fading signals from a distant 
standard-frequency trans- 
mitter or to hook up a TV set 
to a frequency counter. So 
there must be another way 



lOMHi 



LOW FASS, 
FILTER 



vxc 



DIVIDE BY 
I OR dD/9 



V 



RCVR 

laoQKHt 



DIVIDE ST 
4&- 200 



to take advantage of precise 
reference signals generated 
elsewhere but which are al- 
ready easily available in the 
ham shack. 

The Basic Idea 

In almost every populat- 
ed area of the country, at 
least one AM-broadcast sta- 
tion in the 450-1 800-k Hz 
band is available which is 
strong enough to be heard 
even in the basement of a 
building or in the concrete 
jungle of city centers. All the 
care necessary to maintain a 
stable transmitting frequen- 
cy has been taken at the ra- 
dio station already, so there 
is no need to start all over 
again. 

Usually, the radio stations 
maintain a stable frequency 



DiviDE er 
loao 




FHEOENCt/ 

PHASE 
OETECTOft 



Fig. 1. Basic concept. 



iC7 5M74C0O 




OUTPUT 



Fig. 2. Schematic diagram. 



by means of a crvstal oscil- 
lator whose frequency is 
regularly checked against 
and aligned with a reference 
frequency from the Nation- 
al Bureau of Standards or a 
secondary source of a refer- 
ence frequency of similar 
accuracy. Even better, the 
ultimate step has already 
been taken by phase-tocking 
the radio transmitter fre- 
quency to a reference fre- 
quency of the National Bu- 
reau of Standards. 

The transmitting frequen- 
cy of the Deutschlandfunk 
(DLFi phase-locked to a fre- 
quency standard generated 
by the PTB, the German Na- 
tional Bureau of Standards 
(Physikalisch-Technische 
Bundesanstalt), is one exam- 
ple. The PTB transmission 
on 77.5 kHz has a frequency 
stability of better than 10-^ 
ppm per day (lO-^i^) 

Due to variations of prop- 



agation, the frequency of 
the signal received 300 km 
away from the transmitter 
still is accurate to better 
than 0,01 ppm (10-«) or 
0,001 ppmnO-^)fornnea5ur- 
ing periods of 1 and 10 sec- 
onds, respectively.' But 
while a short-term stability 
of station DLF on the order 
of 00001 ppm (1G"^») is 
achieved by a well-regulat- 
ed crystal oscillator, the 
small variations of the re- 
ceived reference frequency 
are filtered out by a very 
slow response of the fre- 
quency-control circuit re- 
sulting in a long-term stabil- 
ity in the same order of the 
broadcast-transmission fre- 
quency. 

Most frequency counters 
and secondary frequency 
standards use a 10-MHz 
crystal oscillator as a master 
clock from which other time 
signals or frequencies are 



derived. And many frequen- 
cy counters and signal gen- 
erators already have a provi- 
sion for synchronization or 
triggering by an externa! fre- 
quency standard. 

My basic idea, therefore, 
was to build a 10-MHz crys- 
tal oscillator, phase-lock it 
to an AM-broadcast trans- 
mitter of high frequency sta- 
bility« and use it as a virtual- 
ly drift -free frequency/time 
signal generator of high ac- 
curacy for frequency count- 
ers, calibrations, etc. Some 
of the design specifica- 
tions were: 

• The unit should be pro- 
grammable to accommo- 
date the AM-broadcast fre- 
quencies of interest. 

• It should be small enough 
to fit into existing equip- 
ment without employing 
large external antennas, 
thus maintaining portability 
of the equipment 



• It should generate a 
10-MHz TTL signal with an 
accuracy similar to the ac- 
curacy of the AM-broadcast 
transmitter employed, i.e,, 
with a short-term stability of 
at least 0.01 ppm (ten times 
better than an oven-stabi- 
lized crystal oscillator) and 
an even higher long-term 
stability. 

• It should be programma- 
ble for the 10-kHz raster of 
AM-broadcast transmission 
frequencies employed in the 
US and for the 9-kHz raster 
already in existence in 
Europe. 

The basic concept is 
shown in Fig. 1. A simple re- 
ceiver picks up a signal of an 
AM-broadcast transmitter in 
the 450-1 800-kHz range. The 
carrier frequency is isolated 
from the modulation and 
fed to a frequency divider 
with a programmable divi- 
sion ratio of 1:45 to 1:200. 

73 M&gazine • JuJy, 1983 33 



INPUT 




INPUT TO FIRST 

SCUM ITT -TRIGGER 

INVERTER 

(AMPLITUDE MOQULATED 



LhPPEfi 



THRESHOLD OF 
mwFR """^^^ SCH«ITT' 

INVeRTEFI 



OUTPUT 

(1C2b,PlN 4] 



OUTPUT OF SECOND 
SCHMiTt -TRIGGER 
INVERTER 



JITTER 



g MO JITTER 
JITTER JITTER 



Fig. 3. Operation of the two Schmitt-tfigger inverters, (a) 
Without a pull-down resistor, the input signal resides on the 
high input level of the first Schmitt trigger. Both edges of the 
output pulse of the second Schmitt trigger are jittering due to 
the amplitude modulation of the ir]put signal, (b) The high in- 
put level of the first Schmitt trigger is pulled down by a 
resistor. Triggering occurs at the zero-crossing point of the ris- 
ing edge of the input signal resulting in a jitter4ree rising edge 
of the output pulse of the second Schmitt trigger. 



For the 10-kHz raster of AM- 
broadcast frequencies em- 
ployed in the US, a range of 
division ratios from 45 to 
180 is selected to yield a 
10-kHz signal at the output 
of the divider. For example, 
for station WJ R in Detroit on 
750 kHz, the division ratio 
would be set to 75, and so 
on. For the European raster, 
a range of division ratios 
from 50 to 200 is selected to 
yield a 9-kHz output signal. 
A ratio of 84, for example, 
divides the carrier frequen- 
cy of station DLF on 756 
kHz to 9 kHz. The 10- or 
9-kHz output signal is fed to 
a frequency/phase detector 
as the reference frequency. 

The desired 10-MHz signal 
is generated by a variable 
crystal oscillator (vxo) whose 
output signal is frequency- 
divided in a pre-divider by 1 
(US) or by 1.111 ■ ■ (Europe) 
and then divided again, by 
the main divider chain, by 
TOOO to yield an output sig- 
nal with a frequency of 10 
kHz (US) or 9 kHz (Europe). 
This variable frequency is 
fed to the frequency/phase 
detector, too, which pro- 
duces a corresponding error 
signal if variable frequency 
and reference frequency do 
not coincide regarding fre- 
quency and/or phase. 

The error signal is passed 
through a low-pass filter in 
order to remove the 10-kHz 
(9-kHz) components. The dc 
component of the error sig- 

34 73 Magazine • July, 1983 



nal is applied to a varactor 
diode in the vxo to pull its 
frequency up or down as re- 
quired. This dynamic pro- 
cess comes to a rest when 
both frequency and phase 
of the variable frequency 
from the vxo and the (con- 
stant) reference frequency 
coincide on the 10(9)-kHz 
level, which in turn pro- 
duces a steady control volt- 
age for the varactor diode in 
the vxo. 

Any tendency to leave 
this steady state due, for ex- 
ample, to a change of ambi- 
ent temperature and its im- 
pact on the vxo frequency is 
immediately balanced by an 
appropriate change of the 
amplitude of the error sig- 
nal, thereby keeping the vxo 
on phase and frequency 
with respect to the refer- 
ence frequency (phase- 
locked loop). An ''unlock" 
indicator signals if phase- 
lock has not been achieved. 

The Circuit 

The complete schematic 
diagram of the circuit is pre- 
sented in Fig, 2. The simple 
AM-broadcast receiver con- 
sists of the integrated circuit 
(ICl) designed for the front 
end of AM/FM receivers. 
Various types of applicable 
ICs are on the market. The 
TAA991 D chosen here oper- 
ates from a 4.5-11 -voft sup- 
ply; it has a voltage gain of 
90 dB and an age range of 60 
dB,^ The TAA991D amplifies 



the signal of the AM-broad- 
cast station received by the 
ferrite antenna^ L1., to about 
4 Vss at its output. 

The very efficient gain 
control accommodates a 
wide range of input-signal 
amplitudes and can cope 
even with very strong signals 
of nearby broadcast sta- 
tions. Furthermore, the time 
constant of the gain control 
is kept so short that it also 
compensates carrier-ampli^ 
tude variations due to the 
modulation. Measurements 
showed that an amplitude 
modulation of the carrier 
frequency of more than 
90% is reduced to less than 
5% by the circuit, resulting 
in an almost steady carrier 
signal at its output. 

Most AM stations modu- 
late far less than 90%, how- 
ever. The output signal of 
the gain-controlled ampli- 
fier is ac-coupled to a 
Schmitt -trigger inverter, IC2, 
which is pulled down at its 
input by resistor R1 to a lev- 
el of about 13 voits.^ The 
value of R1 should be ad- 
justed so that the rising edge 
of the sinusoidal carrier sig- 
nal triggers the Schmitt trig- 
ger at or near its zero-cross- 
ing point (see Fig. 3J Thereby, 
the modulation of the carri- 
er is removed almost com- 
pletely, resulting in a jitter- 
free falling edge of the 
Schmitt-t rigger output sig- 
nal At the output of the sec- 
ond Schmitt trigger, tC2B, a 
jitter-free rising edge is ob- 
tained which triggers the pro- 
grammable divider which 
follows. 

The programmable divid- 
er is a chain of three binary- 
coded decimal (BCD) up/ 
down counters, IC3-IC5.^ 
Generally, the incoming car- 
rier frequency can be divid- 
ed by any integral number 
from 001 to 999. However, 
as mentioned earlier, only 
the range from 045 to 200 is 
needed. The "ones" of this 
number are represented by 
the first counter (IC3}, the 
"tens'' by the second count- 
er (IC4), and the "hundreds" 
by the third counter (IC5). 
Pins 15, 1, 10, and 9 of each 



counter accept the respec- 
tive digit number in BCD 
form. If these pins are in 
logic state! (i.e., connected 
to VqqI their contribution 
to the digit number is 1 , 2, 4, 
and 6 respectively. If they 
are in logic state 0, they do 
not contribute at all. 

For example, if the carri- 
er frequency of station WJ R 
on 750 kHz is to be divided 
down to 10 kHz, the num- 
ber to be programmed is 
075. In this case, the logic 
states of pins 15, 1, 10, and 9 
areO,0, 0,0 for IC5, 1,1,1,0 
for IC4, and 1,0,1,0 for I C3, 
in that order (0X1 +0X2 + 
0X4 + 0X8 = 0, 1 XI +1 X 
2+1 X4 + 0X8^7, and 1 
XI +0X2 + 1 ><:4 + 0X8 = 
5 all together corresponding 
to 075). As the three count- 
ers are wired as down-count- 
ers, the number 075 loaded 
this way is reduced by 1 for 
each cycle of the incoming 
carrier signal. 

If number 000 has been 
reached, an output pulse at 
the output of the counter 
chain (pin 1 3 of IC5) is gener- 
ated which is used to reset 
the counters to the state 
programmed initially (075 in 
the example). The very short 
output pulse is stretched to 
approximately 50 nanosec- 
onds by one of the monosta- 
ble multivibrators of IC6 
and applied to reset pin 11 
of each counter.^ 

Because only one output 
pulse is generated for 75 in- 
put pulses, a division of the 
carrier frequency by 75 is 
achieved. The other mono- 
stable multivibrator of IC6 
which follows stretches the 
length of the 104<;Hz output 
pulse to about 50 ^s for fur- 
ther processing. For the 
European raster of AM- 
broadcast stations, the same 
considerations apply. The 
carrier frequencies are mul- 
tiples of 9, however, and a 
reference frequency of 9 
kHz is obtained by division 
of the carrier frequencies by 
integral numbers from 50 to 
200 in order to utilize AM 
stations in the range from 
450 to 1800 kHz for the 
same purpose. 















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73 Magazine • July, 1983 35 



The vxo consists of a low- 
cost microprocessor crystal 
and one CMOS gate (IC7, 
same pinout as ICS^) as the 
active device. The double- 
varactor diode, BBT04 
green, has a capacity swing 
from 35 pF at 3 volts to 14 pF 
at 30 volts of reverse bias. 
Any other varactor diode of 
similar characteristics is ap- 
plicable. For a voltage swing 
from 1.5 to 5.0 voits at TP2, 
a frequency deviation of ap- 
proximately + 60/ — 95 Hz 
from the noriiinal frequency 
of 10 MHz was measured. 
Initially, trimmer capacitor 
CI is adjusted so that an er- 
ror voltage of about 3 volts 
is measured at TP2 for a 
vxo output frequency of 
10,000,000.0 MHz, 

Several inexpensive crys- 
tals were tried out with ap- 
propriate readjustment of 
CI, and they gave similar 
good results. The CMOS lev- 
el of the vxo signal is con- 
verted to TTL level by the 
combination of one low- 
power Schottky gate (IC8A) 
and a 560-Ohm pult-down 
resistor at its input.^ Another 
gate (1C8B) is used for buff- 
ering the 10-MHz signal It is 
further buffered by TTL 
gates IC9A and IC9B and 
passed to the 10-MHz out- 
put terminal. 

As the 10-MHz signal is 
going to be checked against 
a reference frequency of 10 
(US) or 9 (Europe) kHz, it 
must first be divided by 1 or 
1.111 ■ ■ ' giving a frequency 
of 10 or 9 MHz. The chain of 
three decade counters (IC11 - 
1C13^) which follows divides 
that frequency down to 10 
or 9 kHz and this signal is 
passed to the frequency/ 
phase detector as the vari- 
able frequency together 
with the 10- or 9-kHz refer- 
ence frequency from the 
AM -broadcast receiving 
branch of the circuit 

The alternative division 
by 1 or 1,1 11 , respective- 
ly, is achieved by the com- 
bination of decade counter 
IC10 and gates IC9C and 
1C9D.^ If pin 2 of the decade 
counter is high, i.e., at Vqq 
level, the counter is disabled 

36 73 Magazine • July, 19B3 



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Fig. 5. Power supply. 



and its output terminal (pin 
11) is in a low state. Conse- 
quently, the output of gate 
IC9C rennains high constant- 
ly, enabling gate IC9D 
which passes the pulses 
from the output of gate 
IC8B directly to the input of 
the chain of decade count- 
ers. No frequency division 
takes place in this case (divi- 
sion by 1). However, when 
pin 2 of the decade counter 
is in a low state (grounded), 
the counter is operative. Its 
action is explained in Fig. 4. 
The counter contains a 
chain of four flip-flops with 
designations Q^ for the out- 
put of the first and Qd for the 
output of the last flip-flop. 
For the arrangement shown 
in the schematic, the first 
flip-flop is triggered by each 
negative transition of the vxo 
pulse sequence. Qp assumes 
a high state after 8 input 
pulses and is reset to a low 
state after 10 pulses. This 
constitutes one complete cy- 
cle of the decade counter. 
The logic combination of 
outputs Qa and Q^ by gate 
IC9C produces signal C at its 
output And the logic com- 
bination of signal C and the 
signal of the vxo by gate 
1C9D generates a sequence 



of pulses (D) similar to the 
signal of the vxo with the ex- 
ception that for every 10 
pulses of the vxo one pulse is 
missing. Therefore, 9 pulses 
are generated at the output 
of gate IC9D for 10 pulses of 
the vxo, constituting a divi- 
sion by 10/9 = ri11 . 

The frequency/phase de- 
tector, IC14/ checks the fre- 
quency/phase difference be- 
tween the reference fre- 
quency and the variable fre- 
quency, i.e., the AM-station 
carrier frequency and the 
vxo frequency, respectively, 
both divided down to 10 
(US) or 9 (Europe) kHz. 10(9)- 
kHz pulses appear on pins 5 
and/or 10 with a duty cycle 
corresponding to the differ- 
ence. These pulses are fil- 
tered by a low-pass filter (R2, 
R3, R4, C2, C3, 1^^lH choke) 
and buffered by transistor T1 . 

Any small signal transis- 
tor Is applicable here provid- 
ed it has a gain high enough 
to meet the following speci- 
fications: no frequency/ 
phase difference generates 
a voltage of about 3 voits at 
TP2; a higher frequency or a 
leading phase of the vari- 
able frequency (vxo) with re- 
spect to the reference fre- 
quency generates voltages 



of down to 1 .5 volts or up to 
5 volts in the contrary case. 

This error voltage is ap- 
plied to the varactor diode 
of the vxo which pulls the 
crystal frequency to achieve 
zero frequency difference 
and a very small but con- 
stant phase difference. At 
pin 12 of I CI 4, negative-go- 
ing pulses are generated 
whose duration is propor- 
tional to the phase differ- 
ence of variable and refer- 
ence frequency. They trig- 
ger the Schmitt-trigger in- 
verter, 1C2C, which turns on 
an LED in case of a wide 
pulse width indicating that 
a no-lock condition exists. 

The Power Supply 

In the power supply, two 
regulators are used. One 
serves the most critical com- 
ponent group, i.e., the fre- 
quency/phase detector, the 
vxo, and the vxo buffer, 
IC8A/B, The other serves a 
group containing the re- 
maining components. All 
ground -re turn leads in each 
one of the two groups are re- 
turned to their common 
ground — and a heavy wire is 
recommended here. Fig, 5 
presents the general arrange- 
ment of the power supply. 
Regulator #2 needs a bit of 
heat-sinking. At Vin=+12 
volts, regulator #1 has to de- 
liver approjtjmat^ly 50 mA 
to component group 1 while 
regulator #2 delivers ap- 
proximately 330 mA to com- 
ponent group 2, Total power 
consumption is 4.6 Watts (1 2 
volts at 380 mA). 

Constryction 

The whole circuit was 
mounted on a perforated 
board of 68X100 mm (2- 
5/8" X 3-7/8") size with sol- 
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ing. The discrete compo- 
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number of additional inter- 
connecting wires. For the in- 
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sockets were used, and this 
part of the circuit was wire- 
wrapped. 

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73 Magazine ■ July, 1983 37 



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I 1 



C4 



ica 



IC& 



IC^ 



GND 
VCC2 



L2 



Tl 



ICI3 



IC14 




ICtI 



tcie 



rcto 



C2 



XTAL 



IC7 



\CB 



> ^ 




VARICAP 




CI 



Top side of board. 



were inserted in the perfo- 
rated board where needed, 
The whole circuit board 
may be mounted in a minia- 
ture cabinet 71 mm longX 
102 mm wide X 28 mm high 
(2-3/4'^X4''X1^1/e'a in this 
case, both regulators are 
mounted directly on the in- 
ner surface of the cabinet. 
However, the board may be 

38 73 Magazine • Jufy, 1983 



installed directly into ex- 
isting equipment. In case of 
a metal cabinet, the ferrite 
antenna must be mounted 
externally. 

Alignment 

The test instruments used 
for alignment were a VOM 
with an internal resistance 
of 20k Ohms/volt, a Sab- 



tronics model 861 OA fre- 
quency counter with an HP 
10006 A 10:1 test probe (14 
pF/10 megohms), and a 
small pocket receiver to 
check whether the broad- 
cast station to be utilized is 
on the air. 

First, the receiver is 
aligned by measuring its age 
voltage at TP3 and tuning 
the input and output circuit 
of the receiver for maximum 
age voltage. The negative 
age voltage should be at 
least 0.6 volts and may run 
as high as several volts de- 
pending on the strength of 
the AM station received. 
The component values 
shown in the schematic dia- 
gram were chosen to receive 
a station on 756 kHz. 

With the frequency count- 
er at TP4, one should obtain 
a stable indication of the 
carrier frequency of the AM- 
broadcast station selected. 
If the display is not stable 
within one bit of the last 
digit of the frequency 
counter, make sure that the 
counter is not disturbed by 
residual modulation of the 
carrier, line noise, or other 
signals. 

Next, program the appro- 
priate number into the three 
count-down counters [IC3- 
IC5) which follow to obtain 
a 10(9)4<:H2 reading on the 
frequency counter at TP5. 

Now connect the fre- 
quency counter to TP1 and 
the VOM to TP2 and adjust 
CI so that the frequency 
counter displays 10-20 Hz 
more than 10 MHz (if the 
VOM indicates more than 3 
volts) or 10-20 Hz less than 
10 MHz (if the VOM indi- 
cates less than 3 volts initial- 
ly). Allow the frequency/ 
phase detector up to 30 sec- 
onds to recover from satura- 
tion and observe the VOM. 
The error voltage measured 
at TP2 should stabilize at 
about 3 volts within 60 sec- 
onds with the unlock indi- 
cator turned off and the fre- 
quency counter displaying 
10,000.000 Hz. 9,999,999.9 
Hz, or an overflow to 
{1p,000,000,0 Hz depending 
on its accuracy. If the error 



voltage stabilizes else* 
where, adjust CI of the vxo 
to achieve an indication of 3 
volts. 

Finally, adjust CI so that 
an error voltage of 3.2 volts 
is indicated. This finishes the 
alignment of the circuit. 

Performance 

The performance mea- 
surements were made with 
the same test equipment al- 
ready used for the align- 
ment of the circuit. First, the 
frequency counter together 
with the 10:1 test probe was 
checked. An undesirable 
sensitivity of its internal 
clock generator to TTL sig- 
nals at its input could not be 
found. However, it was sen- 
sitive to heavy line noise, so 
a 12 -volt car battery was 
used to power the frequency 
counter. 

The frequency counter 
had an internal voltage regu- 
lator for 5 voits, but no drop 
of battery voltage occurred 
during the time of measure- 
ment. After warm-up, the 
counter was connected to 
TP1 of the circuit and its in- 
ternal clock aligned for a 
display of 10,000,000 Hz for 
a measuring period of 1 sec- 
ond. Then it was aligned for 
an overflow to [1 )0,000,000 
Hz (representing 10,000,000.0 
Hz) using a measuring peri- 
od of 10 seconds. Using this 
test setup and applying a 
VOM to TP2, the following 
performance measurements 
were made: 

1) The frequency counter 
displayed no other values 
than 0)0,000,000.0 (over- 
flow) or 9,999,999.9 during 
more than one hour of mea- 
surement and for consecu- 
tive measuring intervals of 
10 seconds at room tem- 
perature. 

2) No other values than 
(1 X).000,000.0 (overflow) or 
9,999,999.9 were displayed 
for intermittent shorts of the 
10-MHz output terminal to 
ground. Also, the error volt- 
age of 3.2 volts at TP2 re- 
mained constant in this case. 

3) No other values than 
(1)0,000,000.0 (overflow) or 



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Prices and specifications subject to change without notice or obligation. 




73 Magazine • July, 1983 39 



9,999,999 9 were displayed 
for ambient temperatures of 
3^ C (refrigerator) or 50"=* C 
(stove). No significant 
change of the error voltage 
at TP2 was noticed. (The 
measurements were made 
quickly after the 1-hour 
cooling/heating procedure 
outside the refrigerator/ 
stove since their metal cabi- 
nets prevented the circuit 
from receiving the AM- 
broadcast station) 

4) No other values than 
(IP.OOO.OOOO (overflow) or 
9.999,999.9 were displayed 
for a change of Vjn in steps 
of 10 volts rn the range of 
7-27 volts, 

5) If the circuit is operated 
employing the European 
raster of AM-broadcast fre- 
quencies, phase modulation 
of thelO-MHz signal may be 
expected due to the quasi* 
periodic/aperiodic opera* 
tion of the divide-by- 
1J11 module. However, 
due to the long time con- 
stant of the low-pass filter 
following the output of the 
frequency/phase detector, 
ac components of the error 
voltage are filtered out to a 
large degree and a low 
phase modulation of less 
than 4% peak-to-peak was 
measured with an oscil- 
loscope. 

6) The output frequency set- 
tled to a display of 
(1)0,000,000.0 (overflow) or 
9,999,999.9 within 60 sec- 
onds after power was ap- 
plied to the circuit 

7) The circuit is sensitive to 
heavy line noise which in 
severe cases requires addi- 
tional line filtering in front 
of the power supply It also 
is sensitive to major distur- 
bances of the AM signal. For 
example, during a thunder- 
storm the frequency of the 
10-MHz output signal 
dropped by some Hz several 
times but recovered within a 
few seconds A complete 
loss of the AM signal causes 
a drop of the output fre- 
quency to the lower bound 
of the phase-locked-ioop 
capture range on the order 
of 100 Hz below 10 MHz. 

40 73 Magazine • July, 1983 



^art« LiBt 




Integrated Circuits 




1 MC4044P (Motorola) 


$5.00 


1 SN74LS??l N (Quest Electronics) 


1.19 


1 SN7414N (Quest Electronics) 


,55 


1 SN7400N (Quest Electronics) 


.19 


4 SN7490N (Quest Electronics) 


1.40 


3 &N74ig2N (Quest Electronics) 


2.37 


1 1 SN74C00 (Quest Electronics) 


.35 


1 SN74LSO0N (Quest Electronics) 


,25 


1 TAA99 1 D (S temens- Rei ^ 


2.50 


2 7805C regulators (RF. Electronics) 


2.78 


Crystal 




1 10-MHz crystal (Quest Electronics) 


3.95 


Semiconductors 




1 LEO, red TO-18 (Quest Electronics) 


.15 


1 Transistor BC1 70 or equ ivalent 


:» 


1 Varactor diode SB104gn or equivalent 


.50 


1 Diode 1N4148 


.10 


IC sockets 




4 Wire-wrap, 16 pin (Quest Electronics) 


228 


10 Wire-wrap, 14 pin (Quest Electronics) 


5.50 


Resistors (all 1/10 Watt) 




1 560 Ohm 




3 Ik Ohm 




1 5.6k Ohm 




2 a2k Ohm 




1 10k Ohm 




1 12k Ohm 




3 tSk Ohm 




1 47k Ohm 




1 120k Ohm 




1 22 megohm 


Total for all 1.20 


Capacitors 




(15 V except where fndlcated) 




1 10 pF 


.12 


1 22 pF 


.12 


1 160 pF 


.12 


1 680 pF 


.12 


1 560 pF 


.12 


1 1 nF 


.15 


8 10 nF 


1.60 


1 10nF/50V 


,40 


1 22 nF 


.30 


1 .68 UF 


.40 


1 1 uF, electfoJylic 


.40 


3 6.8 uF. eiectrolytic 


3.00 


1 6.8 uF/50 V, electrolytic 


1.00 


1 10 uF, electrolytic 


1.00 


1 47 uF, electrolytic 


1.00 


1 220 uF, eictrolytic 


1.00 


2 Trimmer capacitors 10-60 pF 


1.00 


Other 




1 Fen^ite rod 1 15 x 8 mm (R33^050-400) 


1.95* 


1 Perforated t>oard 


1.80 


1 Miniaturized filter (12) {L-43.1) 


1.50* 


1 1-mH choke 


.50 


18 Terminal posts for t)oard 


.50 


Wire, solder etc. 


140 




S49.96 


*Amidon Associates, 12033 Otssgo St., 


North Hollywood CA 


91607. 





Conclusions 

As it was considered un- 
likely that during the perfor- 
mance tests variations of 



the output frequcncY of the 
circuit were counterbal- 
anced by identical errors of 
different sign of the frequen- 



cy counter, the following 
conclusions were drawn: 

• The circuit can provide a 
10-MHz reference frequen- 
cy with a short-term stability 
of at least 0.01 ppm and a 
much higher long-term sta- 
bility. 

• Its accuracy and stability 
are directly dependent upon 
the quality of the AM-broad- 
cast signal used as a refer- 
ence frequency. Most AM- 
station frequencies are ac- 
curate to this and even to a 
higher degree. 

• In contrast to a vxo in a 
thermostat, the circuit 
needs no warm-up period, 
it has no drift due to aging, 
it provides at least one order 
of magnitude better stabili- 
ty, and it does not cost 
more. 

• It also has all the provi- 
sions necessary to accom- 
modate a 9-kHz raster of 
broadcast frequencies if the 
FCC should go along this 
way in the future. 

Use the circuit as an ex- 
ternal reference, install it as 
the main clock in the exist- 
ing space of your frequency 
counter, or use it as a cali- 
bration standard for your 
station. In every case, you 
are bringing a degree of fre- 
quency accuracy and stabil- 
ity to your ham shack whkh 
is maintained for you by 
other people day and night 
and brought to your home 
free of charge. Enjoy tt!H 



References 

1. Hetzei P.. "Empfang der Nor- 
malfrequenz des Traegers von 
DCF77/' Physikaffsch Tech- 
nische Bundesanstatt, Braun- 
schweig, Fed. Rep. of Germany, 
March, 1979. 

2. Siemens AG, "Lineare Schal- 
tungen," Datenbuch 7974/75, 
Band 2. Order No. B1 2/1213. 
Siemens Corp., Components 
Group, 186 Wood Avenue South, 
Iseiin NJ 08830. 

3. Texas Instruments, The TTL 
Data Book for Design Engineers, 
Second Edition^ Marketing and 
Information Services. PO Box 
5012 MS 308. Dallas TX 75222. 

4. Motorola, Inc, Phase^Locked 
Loop Systems Data Book. Sec- 
ond Edition, August, 1973. PO 
Box 20912, Phoenix A2 85036. 




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MORE GAIN 

Than a Varactor UHF Tuner 



SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 

Frequency Range 470-399 MHz Channels 
14-83. Qulput Channel 3. Crt 2 or 4 Avail- 

PART#B20 *15°" 

WHAFS IN IT? 

To make a regular UHF tuner into a GILCO HIGH GAIN TUNEfl, eacti and every one of 
the folJowEng steps is painstakingly taken by a certified technician: 

1. The first thing GILCO cJoes is change the standard diode to a hot carrier diodfi, 

2. The tuner's output is then n^easured on our JERROLO field strength meter and com- 
pared to a computer derived chart from which we determine tfie correct value coil to add 
across the iF output for maximum prB-peak&d gain. 

3. The tuner is then ted a standard lOdb 300 ohm antenna input and while monitoring the 
output on ouf HEWLETT PACKARD spectrum analyzer, the tuner is tuned to ttie desired 
channel and its oscillator is offset for ttre desired output frequency as follows: 

Channel 2: 5fl Mhz, Channel 3: 63 Mhz. Channel 4: 68 Hhz 
We call this step peaking because the tuner's output looks like a peak on our spectrum 
analyzer and the highest point of that peak is actually adjusted for the desired output. 

4. The last step is one more measurement on the field strength meter which is again com- 
pared to our performance chart to calculate the correct value of the second coil which is 
added to the tuners internal connections. 

Thjs procedure was developed by GILCO and It rs our computer derived perfonm a nee 
charts that n^ke our tuner better, that's because afmost every tufiergets a ^iWrnnt vaiue 
coH before it's peaked and again a different value coif after it's peaked. The combinations 
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• Use witji GILCO 
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« Requires NO ModiNcatiDJi lo 
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• The only tools required for 
assembly are: screwdriver, solder- 
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• This kit was designed to take ad- ^'^^ ^^ ^^^^ ^^ fisniwam, connacWrs, 22 
vantage of the G ILCO high gain tuner P^9^ Hiustram mtmtion m^nuaK & Giico Hy- 
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Part No. B21 Printed Circuit Board If 

1. This Printed Circuit Board uses oniyom resist. This prevents solder bridges. 
ftimpsr, others use me. 4. Hewest Addnion: the P/C board is plated 

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Part No. B22 ComplBte Electronic Parts Kit OU 

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All integrated Circuits (7), Voltage Regulator, hiaatSink, Diodes (4), IC Sockets (4-6 pir}, 
3-14 pin), Power Transformer (24V, 1A)„ Coil Kit with No. 26 wire (4), Speaker (4", 
3ozj, Standoffs, Coaxial Cable, Ail Misoellaneous Harware, Etc. Ail parts are individually 
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73 Magazine • July, 1983 41 



lAICROLOG 




SPECIFICATIONS 



INPUTS: Receiver audio, in & out phono 
jacks for easy speaker connections. 
Hand key input allows code practice that 
reads your sending and drives the trans- 
mitter keying outputs. 

OUTPUTS TO TRANSCEIVEfit Positive 
and negative switching for CW & FSK key- 
ing, solid state or tube type transmitters, 
AFSK tones at microphone compatible 
levels, T/R{PTT) transmitter control. 

PRINTER OUTPUT: Uses standard VIC 
printer for "Hard-Copy*" of both receive 
and transmit data regardless of on-t he- 
air mode. Also has hi voltage transistor 
switch on board for driving current-loop 
type printers. 

DISC & TAPE INTERFACE: Uses stan- 
dard VIC DISC & DATASET for recording 
off the air and making long "brag tapes." 
Another handy feature is the ability to 
save and re-load your "here-is*' mem- 
ories easily. Since this function is also 
compatible with your VIC disc drive, it's 
especially nice for quick start -^up, 

VARIABLE MEMORY UTILIZATION: A 

unique Microiog feature allows you to 
select the size of your text buffer and 8 
"HERE-IS" messages from the available 
computer RAM. it automatically takes into 
account any memory expansion car- 
tridges you've added. The unexpanded 
ViC has about 3000 characters for you to 
allocate. You could for example choose 
eight 300 character messages and a 600 
character text buffer, if you don*t tell it 
otherwise, the system will default to 
eight 100 character "HERE-IS'* mem- 
ories and a 2200 character text buffer. 
The expanded VIC will have different 
defauH memory sizes, depending on the 
amount of added memory. The program- 
mable ''HERE'lS" memories can be load- 
ed or inserted into the text buffer for 
transmission at any time. 

TEXT BUFFER: Allows you to type ahead 
while receiving. Text entered into the 
buffer is visible above the split-screen 
line for correction before sending. 

AUTO-START; Inhibits the display of 
non-RTTY data. 

TUNING INDICATORS: On screen visual 
tuning aid and audio (pitch) reference 
tone for RTTY and CW. (Audio Is heard 
thru your tv or monitor's sound channel, 
just like any other VIC generated audio.) 

W R U (Who Are You?): Automatically 
responds with your call sfgn when a user 
programmable sequence up to 15 char- 
acters IS received. 

42 73 Magazine • July, 1983 



SEL-CALS: Two 15 character user pro- 
grammable sequences. Receipt of selcai 
#1 enables the printer, disc or tape. 
Receipt of #2 disables these outputs for 
unattended message store (mailbox). 

FULL SPEED OPERATION: Transmit and 
receive Morse — 5 to 199 WPM^ Baudot 

— 60, 66, 75, 100. 132 WPM, ASCII — 100 
& 300 baud. 

MORSE SPEED TRACKING: Automatic 
and speed lock modes^ keyboard selec- 
table. 

VIDEO DISPLAY: Color keyed display 
makes optimum use of the computer's 
color capability. Uses standard ViC for- 
mat of 23 lines of 22 characters. 

SPLIT-SCREEN: Displays text buffer in- 
put above and recetve/reai-tifne transmit 
text below the split line. 

TOP LINE DISPLAY: Constant display of 
Time, Mode, Speed/Code In use, and 
status indicators. 

TEST MESSAGES: Quick brown fox and 
RYRY's in Baudot, U'U* In ASCII, and 
VVV in Morse. 

SPECiAL SYNC-LOCK MODE: Allows im- 
proved ASCII operation and "Paced Out- 
put" in Baudot RTTY. 

T/R(PTT): Fuiiy automatic control of your 
XMTR via the Push-to Talk Una in both 
RTTY and Morse. 

UN'SHIFT on SPACE: Automatically 
shifts back to "LETTERS" upon receipt 
or transmission of a Baudot space. 
Keyboard command on/off. 

SYNC: Transmits "Blank Fill" In RTTY 
and BT in Morse when the text buffer Is 
empty and unit is in transmit. Keyboard 
command on/off. 

OUTPUT MODES: CHAR — outputs each 
character as typed, WORD — outputs 
full word when spacebar \s typed. LINE 

— outputs full line when carriage return 
is typed. BUFFER — outputs full buffer, 
on command. 

REAL-TIME CLOCK: Uses the VIC's In- 
ternal clock for constant on screen 
display of time which can be inserted In- 
to text buffer on keyboard command. 

WORD WRAP AROUND: Prevents split- 
ting words at the end of a line. Works In 
receive as well as trar^smlt. 

MORSE TONE DETECTOR: Single tone, 
800 Hz center frequency, with effective 
bandwidth of 300 Hz, Pitch reference 
regenerated audio tone for easy tuning. 



OUTPUT TO 

THANSMITTEW 

AFSK TONES 

& P.T.T, 



AUDIO OUTPUT 
TOSPei^KER 

I 



wioewAflflOW 

SHIFT 



CODE PFfACTlCe 
H AMD KEY INPUT 



PRINTER LOOP 
SWjTCH OUTPUT 




RTTY DEMODULATOR: True dual tone 
computer enhanced demodulator circuit 
on standard 2125/2295 Hz tone pair com- 
patible with HF RTTY and VHF FM opera- 
tion. Switch selected wide and narrow 
shift- 

CODE PRACTICE: Random five charac- 
ter code group generator sends at any 
speed you set via the keyboard. Hand 
key Input for sending practice and 
manual morse transmission* 

CW ID & NORMAL ID: Two Independent 
16 character memories for either 2 calls 
or one normal and one with auto-CW ID 
for RTTY, 

MECHANICAL: Printed circuit board is 
G-10 epoxy, douWe sided with plated 
thru holes. Board Is solder masked and 
silk-screened with parts locations for 
easy troubleshooting. Size Is S^^" wide 
by 4^^" deep by Va" high. Fits directly Into 
VIC expansion port end is compatible 
with popular expander boards in use. 

NO EXTERNAL POWER REQUIRED: Unit 
is completely powered by host computer, 
eliminating the need for outboard power 
supply. (Entire system; ViC, Microiog 
AIR-1 , & video monitor can easily run from 
12 VDC power for remote or emergency 
battery operation,) 

CONNECTIONS: All Inputs/outputs are 
convenient %" 3 circuit phone or RCA 
phono types. Mating ptugs are ail provided. 

Note: VIC. V!C20 and DATASET are trademarks of 
Commodore ElectronicSf Ltd, 



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73 Magazine * Jufy, 1983 43 



William B. /ones KD7S 
1081 SiGrra Avenoe 
Chvis CA 93612 



Build the 
Billboard Keyboard Keyer 

Get perfectly-timed CW without a buffer. 
Then join the crowd at 60+ wpm. 



Amid a flurry of activity 
to make modern ama- 
teur radio equipment ex- 
tremely sophisticated, 
there are some indications 
of a welcome trend in the 
opposite direction. This is 
evidenced by the populari- 
ty of direct conversion re- 
ceivers, low-power trans- 
mitters, and, in some in- 



stances, keyers. Magazine 
editors are begging for man- 
uscripts describing equip- 
ment the average amateur 
can build without a labora- 
tory full of expensive test 
gear or an engineering de- 
gree in soiid-state physics. 

One area which has not 
felt the full impact of this 
simple design philosophy 



has been that of the key- 
board keyer. Some attempt 
has been made in this direc- 
tion, but it has fallen far 
short of most people's ex- 
pectations. 

One early example of a 
rather uncomplicated de- 
vice appeared in CQ a few 
years ago,^ Unfortunately, 
there was a flaw in the de- 



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Fig. 7. Schematic of the "Billboard"' keyboard keyer. Integrated circuit Q1 is a CD4001B 
and Q2 is a C 040118. Although not shown on the schematic, pins 14 of these chips should 
be connected to +9 volts and pins 7 should be grounded. 

44 73 Magazine • July, 1983 



sign which would have ren- 
dered the unit inoperable 
had the builder not seen a 
following article describing 
an add-on memory which 
was published in a subse- 
quent issue of the same 
magazine.^ The same au- 
thor more recently de- 
scribed a fairly simple key- 
board keyer which appears 
to have whetted the appe- 
tite of many home-brew art- 
ists, judging from the num- 
ber of units heard on the air 
recently,^ Even so, this most 
recent design requires some 
fourteen integrated circuits 
which would intimidate the 
less experienced builder in 
most cases. 

Described here is a key- 
board keyer which requires 
only five commonly avail- 
able CMOS integrated cir- 
cuits. It is capable of gener- 
ating all letters, numbers, 
punctuation, and special 
characters such as AR, BT, 
SK, and AS. The keys are 
electronically disabled dur- 
ing character generation, 
which eliminates disrupting 
that character once it has 
been initiated. Further- 



more, automatic letter 
spacing has been buitt into 
the design so that sending 
machine-perfect CW is no 
longer a rich man's game. 

The last two features, 
keyboard lock-out and au* 
tomatic letter spacfng, are 
extremely important con* 
siderations when you give 
some thought as to how 
they are used. Take the 
combination "CQ" as an ex- 
ample. The operator mo- 
mentarily depresses the "C" 
key and that character be- 
gins. He may then immedi 
ately depress the "Q" key 
and hold it down until the 
letter 'X" and the space fol- 
lowing it have been com- 
pleted. Then and only then 
will the letter "Q" begin, at 
which time the operator re- 
leases the key and a perfect 
''CQ'' will be generated. 
With very little practice, 
this method can be used for 
all words transmitted, thus 
reducing or eliminating al- 
together the need for ex- 
pensive and complicated 
buffer memories. 

It is my opinion that buff- 
ers do nothing more than 
compensate for poor typing 
ability in much the same 
way some operators use lin- 
ear amplifiers to compen- 
sate for poor operating 
practices. If you are loud 
enough, somebody will 
surely answer you. If the op- 
erator is willing to practice 
for a bit with a bufferless 
keyboard, it is quite easy to 
fool other keyboarders into 
believing you actually do 
have such a buffer in- 
stalled. Enough said. 

Finally, no provisions for 
automatic word spacing 
have been included, as it 
was not felt necessary. 
Most operators can simu- 
late near^perfect word 
spacing by ear. Again, this 
results in a meaningful re- 
duction in cost and com- 
plexity. 

Design Philosophy 

Simplicity by itself is 
worthless unless considera- 
tion to reliability has been 
given. We have al! seen the 



deceptively simple design 
which works poorly or not 
at all. The author was deter- 
mined that this device not 
fall into that category. For 
that reason, schematics and 
parts lists were circulated 
to selected amateurs who 
represented a cross-section 
of building abilities and ex- 
perience. Each was encour- 
aged to build his keyboard 
as he saw fit. In each case, 
performance was identical 
to that of the two originals I 
built. A defective capacitor 
caused one unit to operate 
erratically until the culprit 
was found and relegated to 
the garbage can. Another 
builder used integrated cir* 
cults of dubious heritage 
and experienced some 
problems when operating in 
high ambient temperatures. 
Barring this sort of trouble, 
others building this key- 
board keyer should have 
absolutely no difficulty in 
getting it to work, perfectly, 
the first time. 



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Circuit Operation 

A diode matrix is used to 
encode the keyswitches to 
information which the elec- 
tronic circuitry needs to 
form Morse code charac- 
ters. Some designers prefer 
to use toroid transformers 
for this purpose. It is a moot 
question as to which meth- 
od is superior as both have 
advantages as well as disad- 
vantages. Diodes were cho- 
sen here mainly for the high 
degree of reliability they af- 
ford. They are widely avail- 
able and inexpensive as 
well. 

Integrated circuit Q4 is a 
parallel in/serial out shift 
register. Its output (Q8) is 
used to control Q2Q Q2B, 
and Q3B which comprise a 
dash generator. Any time a 
logic zero is present at pins 
1 and 2 of Q2C a dash will 
be generated. Otherwise, 
only dots will be formed. 
Logic zeros are pro- 
grammed into the shift reg- 
ister by placing a diode on 



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the appropriate input line 
and strobing pin 9 (load) 
high. As the clock input of 
the shift register (pin 10) is 
pulsed, any logic zero pro- 
grammed will eventually 
work its way to the output 
and cause a dash to be sent 

Integrated circuit QS is 
a programmable down- 
counter. It is preloaded to 
one number higher than 
dots or dashes in the appro- 
priate Morse character. The 
purpose of this is to keep 
the keyed clock (QIA and 
Q2A) running for the addi- 
tional time necessary to 
complete the automatic let- 
ter spacing. The counter is 
preloaded in identical fash- 
ion to the shift register. 

Gate QIC enables the 
output gate, Q1D, in all 
cases except when the 
counter has reached the 
number one or zero so that 
the letter space will not ap- 
pear as a code element 

The other half of the 
dual-D flip-flop, Q3A, per- 





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Fig. 2. Piacement guide for diodes in the diode matrix. The first column refers to the 
CD5422 dowfhcounter. The second column is for the CD4021 shift register. A dot indicates 
that a diode is to be placed in the appropriate /rne. All diodes are silicon switching types 
such as 1N914S or 1N4148s. The use of germanium diodes such as lN34s is not recom- 
mended. 

73 Magazine * July, 19&3 45 






forms the keyboard lock- 
out function by presenting 
a logic one to the common 
terminal of all keyswitches 
during character genera- 
tion. Only after a character 
and its space are completed 
will the Q output go low. al- 
lowing another character to 
be started. 

All this may seem rather 
complicated at first, but a 
couple of trips through the 
logic should bring every- 
thing together in short or- 
der. Consider each section 
separately instead of trying 
to visualize the action si- 
multaneously. There are a 
lot of things going on at the 
same time, which may tend 
to confuse the reader who 
tries to understand the cir- 
cuit as a single unit 

It can be seen from the 
schematic that everything 
is used. That is, there are no 
unused gates laying around 
doing nothing, no flip-ftops 
standing idle. Nothing is 
wasted, which is one reason 
this kind of performance 
can be had with only five 
active devices, 

The addition of a side- 
tone generator Is left up to 
the individual builder. Most 
modern transceivers al- 
ready have them built in. 
On the other hand, it is use- 
ful to have some method of 
monitoring your progress as 
you practice sending with- 
out the rig being activated. 
In my latest version, a Ra- 
dio Shack Piezo Buzzer 
(part #273-060) was driven 
by a 2N2222A-tYpe transis- 
tor and served the function 
of a sidetone generator sim- 
ply and inexpensively. The 
singular drawback to this 
device is that the pitch is 
rather high for this applica- 
tion. Alternately, a 555 tim- 
er wired as an audio oscil* 
lator could be driven by a 
transistor in a similar man* 
net to the Radio Shack de- 
vice. Whatever method you 
choose, remember, the driv- 
ing capability of CMOS in- 
tegrated circuits is limited 
to extremely high imped- 
ance loads. Consult the 

46 73MagazinB • Jufy, 1983 



CMOS Cookbook by Lan* 
caster for additional infor- 
mation. 

Transmitter keying is 
best done with a transistor 
instead of a reed relay to re- 
duce the overall current 
drain. Since the entire keyer 
is capable of operating for 
extended periods of time 
from a single nine-volt tran- 
sistor radio battery, it 
would be a shame to throw 
this feature away in order to 
use a relay. My rig is all sol- 
id state and requires keying 
a positive voltage to 
ground. Again, the 2N2222A 
was brought into play and 
performs the task welf. 
For those rigs which re- 
quire keying a high nega- 
tive voltage to ground, 
something similar to the cir- 
cuit used in the CMOS ver- 
sion of the A ecu- Keyer 
should do well* A recent 
paragraph in QST described 
a system which is designed 
to key both kinds of rigs 
without worrying about 
switching and could prob- 
ably be adapted to this key- 
board with little effort^ In 
any event, considerations 
should again be given to the 
limited current-driving ca- 
pabilities of CMOS integrat- 
ed circuits. 

Construction 

Due to the simplicity of 
the design, it was decided 
that no printed circuit 
board layout was neces- 
sary. Instead, the prototype 
models were constructed 
on perf board using point- 
to-point wiring. This meth- 
od has proven most satis- 
factory in this and other 
projects I have designed. 
One local builder used 
wire-wrap, which also 
worked out well although it 
was slightly more expen- 
sive. 

Sockets were used for the 
integrated circuits to aid 
the builder should trouble- 
shooting become neces- 
sary. The small additional 
cost is usually well justi- 
fied, as many years of build- 
ing experience has borne 
out 



The diode matrix is easily 
wired by running "lines" of 
number eighteen bare cop- 
per wire horizontally on 
one side of the board and 
vertically on the other. The 
author terminated the verti- 
cal wires with miniature 
flea clips purchased from 
the local Radio Shack store. 
Wires from the individual 
keyswitches were then sol- 
dered to the clips, resulting 
in a neat and orderly pack- 
age. 

Some number eighteen 
wire may tend to be springy 
and difficult to handle as it 
comes off the spool. By 
placing one end in a vise 
and pulling on the other 
end, the wire may be 
stretched slightly which will 
cause it to go limp and per- 
fectly straight. Try this trick 
and you will be pleased 
with how well it works. 

My unit was housed in a 
cast-off computer key- 
board enclosure garnered 
at the local surplus empori- 
um for a cost of under five 
dollars. An earlier version 
was built into a home-brew 
box which was not very at- 
tractive but quite function- 
al. It is difficult to justify 
putting a twenty-dollar cir- 
cuit into a twenty-five-dol- 
lar box with my limited bud- 
get. If that sort of thing 
doesn't bother you, there 
are some very nice com- 
mercial enclosures avail- 
able. )ust remember to 
make it metal for shielding 
the circuit from strong rf 
fields. 

The actual keyswitches 
were purchased from Jame- 
CO Electronics of Belmont, 
California. They come as a 
unit molded into a plastic 
base thirteen inches long. 
Because I had need for only 
forty-four keys instead of 
the sixty-three supplied, the 
unit was cut down to ten 
and one-half inches long 
prior to wiring. This modifi- 
cation allowed space inside 
the enclosure for additional 
circuitry which will be de- 
scribed in a subsequent arti- 
cle. 



As with any project, the 
finished unit is only as good 
as the parts which go into it. 
Cutting corners usually re- 
sults in compromised oper- 
ation. If a silver mica ca- 
pacitor is specified, use 
one. The same applies to 
tantalum capacitors. They 
were chosen for a reason. 
Also, wherever possible, 
use ''B" series integrated 
circuits as they are more re- 
liable and better suited for 
this application. The erratic 
operation in high ambient 
temperature environments 
discussed earlier was cured 
by switching from "A" 
series to "B" series chips 
from a reliable vendor. 
Nine-volt transistor radio 
batteries are ideal power 
sources for CMOS designs. 
However, one should take 
care to get a quality unit. 
Don't waste your money on 
the dimestore cheapies. 
Don't rob the one out of the 
kid's handie-talkie. Buy a 
fresh alkaline cell for best 
results. It is money well 
spent. 

If there is a keyboard 
keyer in your future but the 
family budget won't allow 
the several hundred dollars 
a commercial iob requires, 
consider rolling your own. 
You will be the winner all 
the way around in dollars 
saved and pride of using a 
piece of equipment you 
built yourself. As an added 
bonus, most keyboarders 
find their code speed in- 
creasing steadily and rapid- 
ly. Perhaps the ^'Billboard" 
described here is the key to 
an Extra class license for 
you.H 

References 

1. Helfrlck. **An Integrated CIr* 
cuit Morse Code Keyboard." 
CO, Seplemtjer, 1973. 

2. Heifrick, **A Memory for the 
Integrated Circuit Morse Key* 
board/' CQ. November, 1973, 

3. Heifrlck, **Ari Inexpensive 
Morse Keyboard/' OST, Janu* 
ary, 1978, 

4. Hinkte, "An Accu^Keyer for 
QRPp Operation/' QST, Jany- 
ary, 1976. 

5. Balla, "Automatic Output Po- 
larity for the Accu-Keyer/' QST, 
April, 1979. 



ALL ITEMS ARE 
GUARANTEED OR SALES 
PRICE REFUNDED. 

PRICES FO.B. 
HOUSTON 

PRICES SUBJECTTO 
CHANGE WITHOUT 
NOTICE. 

ITEMS SUBJECT TO 
PRIOR SALE. 



G£^. 



V .X. ^^ 




Electronics Supply 



Houston COM-VENTION '83 

The 1903 ARRL 

National 
Oct, 7-9, 1983 

Astro Village Hotel 



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SPECIAL 



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IF irs 

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COMPUTERS + RADrO 
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See List of Aifvenisefs on page TH 



73 Magazine * July. 1983 47 



Construct the Lead-Foot Key 

if you like your CW in the fast lane, you II love this key. 
And it is guaranteed not to slip— at any speed. 



Editor's Note: Molttng lead can b« dangerous! Not only can you get burned, but the fumes can be toxic, too. Use caution and plenty of ven- 
tilation 



;, R Owens WSJQE 
Rte. t, BOK 218*7 
Pottsboro JX 7507b 



Have you ever consid- 
ered building your 
own keying-paddle, only to 
be stopped short by lack of 
a heavy metal base? Me, 
too. Then, one day after 



eating some sardines, I was 
about to throw the can 
away, when I took a second 
Look and got a great idea. 
Why not fill the sardine can 
with nnelted lead and use it 
for the base? 

Thinking about it for a 
while, I could find no flaws, 
so I scrounged some used 
automobile tire-balancing 
weights and melted them 
into the can with my pro- 




The finished mode! with glass-epoxy paddle arms, which 
give it a '"hard'' feel, like the commercial paddles. Phenolic 
arms are more flexible arid give it a "'soft'' feeL If you like a 
really soft feel, make the arms an inch longer. Hey! If you 
don't like sardines, you can get smoked clams or oysters in 
the same size can! 

48 TSf^agazlnB • July, 1983 



pane torch. The metal 
clamps floated to the sur- 
face where I picked them 
off with pliers. The sludge 
also floated to the surface, 
and I scraped it off with the 
lid from the can. (A friend 
of mine used lead pipe and 
melted it in the can over a 
kitchen range burner. But, 
before that, he drilled a 
hole in each end of the can, 
and put a sheet metal screw 
through it, this to hold the 
lead casting and the can 
securely together.) So far, 
so good. 

After the lead-filled can 
cooled down, I washed off 
the traces of sardine oil 
with solvent (you can use 
lantern fuel, paint thinner, 
acetone, etc), then roughed 
the surface with fine sand- 
paper, and gave it a coat of 
paint. Not bad. The upside- 
down can was smooth and 
nicely contoured. Heavy 



r 



TL« CONTACT 



I J" 



J-. 



M^fl* 



l*-» 



Fig, 1. Paddle construction. 
Clamp glued ends together 
until cement has cured. Use 
same technique for tm-plate 

ground contact 



too. -it weighed four 
pounds. 

A little later on, 1 found 
that it was also very adapt* 
able for mounting the key- 
ing hardware. All I had to 
do was drill pilot holes 
through the can and into 
the lead casting — very 
slowly. If you don't have a 
hand-drill or variable-speed 
electric drill, use your regu- 
lar electric drill, but turn it 
on and off repeatedly to 
keep it from running fast I 
used a #4 drill, 3/32" in 
diameter, and kept it oiled. 
Now t was able to mount 
the parts with #6 X 1/4" 
sheet-metal hex-head 
screws. Neat 

The Paddle Arm 

The biggest challenge I 
found in making the paddle 
arm was finding the right 
material. I went through the 
usual list of leaf switches, 
hacksaw blades, etc., only 
to find out that those 




e 



T 



Fig. 2. Keying stanchions. To 
begin, gap the points at 
0.010 



\f*^ 



PIECE Of 

Cflisqo CAN 



3/a 



I (/4' 




f>HEHOL»C 



EPOXY 
€LASS 



WIfTE 



Fig. J. Details of paddle-arm assembly. 



springy gadgets have minds 
of their ownl They keep on 
bounding back and forth 
after you want them to 
stop, and good electrical 
contacts they ain't. So, after 
many trial-and-error expert* 
ences, I got down to some 
basic reasoning. 

What I really needed was 
a lightweight material, hav* 
ing low mechanical Q, or 
high damping factor, some- 
thing rigid in one plane and 
flexible in the other. But 
what? Then it hit me. How 
about a strip of perfboard 
or, better still, two pieces? 
After some experimenting, I 
ended up with two strips of 
3/64" (0 0468) glass-epoxy 
board, about 5/8" wide and 
VA'" long, glued together at 
the last half-inch on each 
end with epoxy cement. 
You also can use cyanoac- 
rylate cement. See Frg. 1. 

This assembly provided 
the desired damping factor, 
and more. Let me explain, 
When you bend the arm, 
one of the perfboard pieces 
is stretched and the other 
one is compressed, and the 
friction between the two 
absorbs the stored kinetic 
energy quickly. If you want 
to test this, clamp one end 
in a vise, and flick the other 
end with a finger Listen 
closely, and note the time it 
takes for the vibration to 
stop. Now try this same test 
with a hacksaw blade and 
you will find that the vibra- 
tions last ten times as 
long. No minor difference 
here, but a major improve- 
ment. OK? 

The Dit-Dah 
Elecfrtcal Contacts 

Still another challenge 
was finding a satisfactory 
substitute for the precious- 
metal contacts used on the 



finer commercial models. 
No big problem with the 
stanch ion contacts — 6-32 
nickeli^lated brass screws* 
about one inch long, worked 
OK. I made the stanchions 
by cutting a terminal-strip 
into two pieces, and mount- 
ing them to the base with 
half-inch angle brackets. 
See Fig. 2. 

The common, or ground 
contact, on the paddle arm 
was a little trickier The best 
thing I could find was shiny 
tin-plate, such as used for 
Crisco and other hydroge- 
nated vegetable-oil cans. 
S-o-oo, I raided the refriger- 
ator and tranif erred the 
cooking grease from its 
container into a plastic stor- 
age box. Then I cut off a 
piece of the can material 
about a half inch wide and 
an inch long, cleaned all the 
grease off it, bent it around 
the paddle arm, and glued 
it in place. See Figs> 3 and 4. 

Next, I soldered the flexi- 
ble ground wire to the bend 
point. Finally, I sprayed the 
contact surface for lubrica- 
tion and corrosion resis- 
tance . .WD-40 or TV tun- 
er spray works well. Voila! 
Soft-touch contacts. Not 
gold, but so much much 
better than blued steel. 

The Non-Slip Fee! 

One thing I hadn't 
planned on was a 4-pound 
paddle slipping around on 
my operating desk, even 
with rubber feet on it. I 
talked with some other 
hams and they told me that 
they had the same problem 
with their bugs and paddles. 
Some glued them to their 
desks, others drilled holes 
and screwed them down. 

Well, I kept trying dif- 
ferent things until one day I 
hit the jackpot with poly- 




fig. 4. Top view of the completed key. The dimensions were 
measured on one of the models^ but need not be exact 



urethane foam This is the 
stuff used for cushioning 
fragile items for mailing. It 
also is used as weatherstrip- 
ping tapes. It worked, beau- 
tifully. Dime-size pieces, 
about one-quarter inch 
thick, glued to the lead 
base, did the job^ The final 
choice was two strips, 
about a half inch wide, 
glued with rubber cement 
along each underside of the 
base. This stuff works on 
the commercial paddles, 
too. fust slip a little piece 
under each one of the rub- 
ber feet to make contact 
with the desk surface. I 
know, because I own one of 
those commercially-built 
paddles, a fine piece of 
precision machinery. 
So, why did I go through 



all of this work to build a 
paddle? Well, the problem 
is that the manufactured 
paddle is iambic, and I am 
non-iambic. That's incom- 
patibility. I just couldn't 
avoid closing both the dit 
and dah contacts at the 
same time, too often in the 
wrong order. Mistakes, mis- 
takes, mistakes. So, I decid- 
ed that the ''squeeze" sys- 
tem, as well as the squeeze 
paddles, were not for me. 
Unfortunately, I could find 
no non-squeeze, non-iam- 
bic paddle on the market. 
So, I built my own. Maybe 
this article will stimulate 
some manufacturer to take 
a step backward. Anything 
to cut down on the keying 
mistakes on the air would 
be a blessing. ■ 




Hardware for the key. The contact stanchions were made 
from a second terminal board (same as the one on the left) 
cut into two pieces. The angle brackets for the contact stan- 
chions shown had pierced-and-threaded holes, but their 
base ends had to be cut off to leave only one hole. Ordinary 
1/2" X 1/2"" angle brackets would serve as welL The sink- 
faucet washers may be glued to the base to raise it higher if 
desired. The sheet metal screws for the terminal board 
have to be 1/2^' to 5/8" long to account for the standoff 
spacers. 

7S Magazine * Juty« 1983 49 



m 



Phil Anderson W0Xi 
3005 W. 1 9th Street 
Lawrence KS 66044 



The $2 Infinite-Memory Keyer 

Take a break. Your cassette recorder 
will send any message for you. 



If you have a cassette 
tape recorder and like to 
operate CW, you can add 
an infinite memory keyer to 
your station for about two 



CASSETTE 



LIMITER 



PEAK 
DETECTOR 



SIGNAL 



* VOiTS n 



X VOLTS 
■0 VOLTS 




dollars. The idea is to place 
your CW messages on cas- 
sette tapes and play them 
back to key your transmit- 
ter. The demodulator 




LOW-PASS 
FILTER 



I 1 ^--|--j^ J^^/ 




OUTPUT 



+ VOLTS 



-0 VOLTS 



M VOLTS - BUS LEVEL AT Ul. FIN 3. 

Fig. 7, Cassette memory keyer block diagram. 



lOOK 



(OK 



FROM \ il ^ 

CASSETTE ^^ ?r ^^ 






/7? 



/n 



tOK :JioK ;;iOK. 




Dt 



I' 



/n 



lOOK 



presented in this article will 
convert the CW tones from 
the tape player into keying 
Signals to drive the trans- 
mitter. 

For repetitive messages 
such as CQ CQ DE , you 
can use a continuous cas- 
sette tape. These come in 
1/2-, 1-, 2-, and 3-minute 
durations. The tape in the 
cassette is looped back on 
itself and thereby forms a 
continuous tape. For code 
practice or message broad- 



I 



ni .q-v 01 

lOOM 

m 





>"LED^ 



TTL 
OUTPUT 



/tl 



Fig. 2. Schematic of keyer system. 



casts, the usual CI 5, C30, or 
€60' cassettes could be 
used. 

Code can be placed on a 
cassette by using an audio 
oscillator or your transmit- 
ter sidetone- Best results 
are obtained if the code is 
transmitted directly from 
the oscillator circuit to the 
mike input of the cassette 
tape recorder rather than 
recorded by microphone 
pickup. Too much back- 
ground noise results from 
the latter. 

Demodulation 

Before presenting the 
cassette keyer, let's look at 
the general demodulation 
process. As shown in Fig. 1, 
it consists of four steps: lim- 
iting, peak detecting, low- 
pass filtering, and slicing. 
The limiter is used to 
amplify the cassette CW 
tones and to provide suffi- 
cient drive for the peak 
detector. Also, the limiter 
will smooth out any small 
variations in the amplitude 
of the tones. This process is 
similar to FM detection ex- 



50 73 Magazine • July, 1983 



cept that the filter or dis- 
criminator is discarded. 

The peak detector is set 
to convert the limited tones 
to positive-going pulses. It 
acts as a half-wave rectifier 
but retains the positive 
peaks for a short duration; 
hence, the pulses have a 
slight ripple pattern at their 
tops. The circuit ignores the 
negative-going portions of 
the tones. 

The lov^^-pass filter is then 
added to remove these rip- 
ples. The system will work 
without the filter as long as 
input tones are clean and 
strong, it aids operation, 
however, when tape output 
is marginal. 

The slicer converts the 
peak-detected pulses into 
TTL-compatible signals that 
go from volts in the off 
state to about 3.5 volts in 
the on state. 

Circuit Schematic 

Now, let's examine the 
circuit schematic, Fig. 2. All 



of the signal processing is 
done with a single opera- 
tional amplifier chip, an 
LM324, which contains four 
separate op amps. The cir- 
cuit can be operated from a 
5- or 9-volt dc supply, All 
resistors are Ik, 10k, or 
look, with the exception of 
one 470"Ohm resistor 

Circuit Operation 

Cassette tones enter at 
the left and the TTL-com- 
patible output is at bottom 
right The circuit can also 
drive a low-voltage relay if 
it is substituted in place of 
the Ik output resistor at pin 
14. 

The limiter, U1, has a 
gain of ten and is biased at 
pin 3 to one-third of the sup- 
ply voltage. This bias also 
sets the dc voltage level at 
pins 1, 5, 6, 10, and 12. 

The peak detector, U2, 
charges capacitor CI to the 
peak voltage of the tones 
that appear at pin 5. When 



the voltage at pin 5 exceeds 
the voltage on CI and 
hence also at pin 6, U2 for- 
ward biases diode D1 and 
further charges CI. When 
the voltage at pin 5 drops, 
U2 turns off and CI holds 
its charge until the bleeder 
resistor, R1, discharges it. 
CI and R1 are set so that the 
ripple at CI is small but the 
pulse formed from the code 
signals follows the code 
quickly; this is always a 
compromise. 

The ripple is then re- 
moved by the RC low-pass 
filter. It does a sufficient 
job and frees up the fourth 
op amp in the LM324 IC to 
be used as a tuning indi- 
cator, 

U3 and U4 work as slic- 
ers, or comparators, and 
convert the pulses from the 
peak detector into TTL- 
compatible signals. A dc re- 
store circuit could be used 
here as an alternative. The 
advantages of the slicer are 



that it cleans up some rip- 
ple that may still remain 
and generates sharp and 
clean rise and fall edges for 
the keying output. The bias 
for U3 and U4 is set about 
one volt above the bias for 
U1 and U2. Therefore, when 
a pulse is generated at U2, 
the voltage crosses over the 
bias voltage of U3 and U4, 
generating positive pulses 
at their outputs. That is, 
when the voltage at pin 12 
exceeds the bias voltage at 
pin 13, pin 14 will have an 
output nearly equal to the 
supply voltage. 

The output of U3 is used 
to drive an LED indicator. 
This makes tuning and cir- 
cuit verification of proper 
operation easy. The circuit 
as a whole could be used 
for receiver CW demodula- 
tion if a CW filter is placed 
between U1 and U2. You 
may want to consider that 
when planning circuit con- 
struction. Happy cassette 
keyingiB 



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73 Magazine • July, 1983 51 



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The blanker works well on both CW 
and SS8 modes that are being in- 
terfered with by a woodpecker. Con- 
trols on the front panel include; four 
push button switches, a synchronize 
control and a width control The WB-1 
also features a iow- noise untuned 
broadbanded 6 db gain pre amp which 
can be selected with or without the 
blanker enabled. The WB 1C uses the 
same circuitry but includes a carrier 
operated relay (COR). This provides 
protection to the receiver section dur- 
ing transmissions from the attached 
transceiver. 

Prices and Specifications subject to change 
Without notice or obligation. 



■i' 



y 






BRiTTS TWO-WAY RADIO 

2508 N. Atlanta Rd. 

Smyrna, GA 30080 

(404) 432-8006 

1-800-241-2027 -223 



^^ ^H ^L Brings you the 



Breakthrough! 



52 72 Magazine • July, 1983 



hl;ri:>lh the hvmi 



WUH TWIS OAKS VW TR.\. 



PROGRAMS 





PACKET RADIO 



CW TEACHING 
SYSTEMS 

Twin Oaks Associates is a 
partneTship of menial health 
pTofessionals who are hams in' 
teresied in helping others to 
learn CW. Twin Oaks has de- 
veloped ihr^e Morse code 
teaching systems on tape which 
represent the careful applicQ' 
lion of psychological princi- 
ples to (eaming. They help 
srudenii learn to recognize and 
copy Morse characters at a very 
high speed. 

The first set of tapes is called 
S3fstet7i 12® At is designed for 
the ham who may have a Novice 
or Technician class license but 
can't "get oier the hump" to 
pass the General class code test. 
System 12 takes students post 15 
u'ords per minute on five cure* 
fully 'Structured, successii'e'de* 
mand, 60'mmute cassettes. 

The second training program 
is called Syste?ii 24^'&At assumes 
that the student is able to copy 
comforuihly at 9 or JO words 
per minute hut would like to go 
after the amateur Extra class 
license. This program is on five 
60-minute cosseiies and carries 
the student past 30 words per 
minute. 

The third teaching system, 
the System 12 Afphabef Book ''\ 
is designed for persons itho 
know absolutely nothing about 
Morse code, h may he used, 
hou'et'er, by persons who are 
not thoroughly com/ortableat 5 
fiords per minute, and it is use* 
ful for either classroom or self* 
instruction. 

Each program, or system, 
comes with iu Q%vn carefully* 
UTitten study guide. Systems 
12 and 24 cost $30 each, und 
the System 12 Alphabet Book 
costs $15, 



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at any user baud rataRS232 HDLC for 202 
modem used for AFSK or direct to Rf 
equipment for FSK. 



Custom Systems Custom Programming 

Bill Ash BY 

AND SON 
K2TKN— KA20EG 201-658-3087 

BOX 332 PLUCKEMIN N.J. 07978 



NO MORE MISSED CALLS 
OR ANNOYING CHATTER. 



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shipping & handling 
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commercial-grade kit lets you take control ! 

Now it's possible for individuals and repeater groups to have a personaJ (of emer' 
gency) commercial -quality DTMF system, at very low cost. Speedcairs new 31 2K 
decoder kit easily assembles into a compact^ higli-performance unit. Featijres 
include a virtually unfalsable *'Wrong Dlg'a Lockout** circuit which permits only 
correct signals to be accepteii as valid. And the 31 2K decodes ^\ sixteen digits, 
permitting expanded flexibility and special control applications. 

Commercial versions of the 31 2K are used to perform selective calling of mobile fleet 
operations, on-off control of remote facilities (such as power , valves, pumps, etc.), 
and to receive iJie status of single functions (repeater site failure or intrusion, equip* 
ment vandalism, power failure, vaive or compressor function change, etc.) Speedcall 
Corporation manufactures a complete line of DTMF signaling and control systems. 
For more information write or call Speedcall at 415/7S3-5611. 

Outiml : Single open cqI lector output. 200rnA, 
Input Signal R ang^.- 20mV to 6V (riat input). 
Code Capacity: 3 to 8 digit address plus seiect 
any of t^e 16 touch-tone digits 35 desired, 
lottery Voltaoe; 13.8VOC Norn. (9 to 16VOCJ 
# 30mA nominal On standby^^ 




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Reset Push Button 
and Buzzer ..« $104. 



See LiSt Qt Advertii^fs^ on p^ge fm 



To order, senii check or money order to: 

LflSPEEDCALL 

^^CORPORATION .3 

415 783 5G1T 

(California ResidenTs add 6% Sales Tax) 

73 Magazine • July, 1^3 53 



Robert Swirsky AF2M 
412 Arhuckle Avenue 
Cedarhurst NY 11516 



Apple; Morse, and You 

Simple software and cheap hardware make for a great CW 

keyboard recipe. Just add one operator. 



Have you been looking 
for a CW keyboard 
program in BASIC for your 
Apple II computer with Ap- 
plesoft? The program pro- 
vided here will enable you 
to use the Apple as a CW 
keyboard with sidetone 
and speeds adjustable from 
around 5 words per minute 
to about 70. The program is 
easily modified to provide 
for any special characters 
you might wish to have. 



Lines 1000 to 1460 con- 
tain the Morse data. The 
data lines consist of the 
ASCII value for the charac- 
ter followed by a Morse 
representation. A 3 signi- 
fies a dash, a 1 stands for a 
dot, and a marks a space. 
For example, line #1110 
says the following: 

1110 DATA 65,1 30 

The number 65 is the 
ASCII code for an upper- 



* 5V 
4 



■tVOLTAOE FOR 
REEO RELAY 



GAME 1/0 
PIN t5 
TTL (NPUT 
{TO AN03 



loa 



;:470ja 



LNSI4^ 

— W- 



2H2222 



t 



IN,SI4 



€u 



ifTl 

f TO 

J| ^TRANSMITT 



£R 



KEY JACK 



FTEEQ 

RELAY 



4 TK 



O" 



Z2ZZ 



4 70X1 



TTL GROUNU e- 



£flN e OW GftHE I/Ol 



/77 



Ffg. 1, No parts values are critical. *Any small switching 
diode can be used- 

54 73 Magazine * July, 1983 



case A. The 130 means 
did ah, followed by a short 
space to keep it from run- 
ning into the next letter. 

When the program is run, 
the computer will take the 
data listed between lines 
1000 to 1460 and load it in- 
to the string matrix CODES. 
The location within CODES 
is the ASCII value of the 
character; in other words, 
location 65 in CODES con- 
tains the data for the Morse 
letter A. When characters 
are sent to the computer 
from the keyboard, the 
computer changes the let- 
ters to their ASCII value (us- 
ing the BASIC ASC($) com- 
mand) and looks in CODES 
KASCH value of letter>) 
for the Morse data. The 
Morse data is then dis- 
sected character for char- 
acter using the BASIC 
M I D$(XSXX) command. 

Lines 80 to 90 are for the 
CW sidetone. These lines 



POKE a machine language 
subroutine which will en- 
able the Apple to send the 
CW through the internal 
speaker. The value POKEd 
into decimal location 768 
on line 70 determines the 
pitch of the sidetone. 

Line 130 gets a single 
character input from the 
keyboard. This character is 
then checked to see if it is a 
control character used for a 
special purpose on lines 
140 to 160. In this program, 
the control characters A, 
B, Y, and Z are used for 
special functions. 

The subroutine at line 
200 is what takes the Morse 
data from the proper loca- 
tion in CODES and gener- 
ates the Morse signal from 
it The Morse character can 
be heard on the Apple 
speaker. Also, the annun- 
ciator TTL output number 
will be toggled on and off 
in Morse code. This signal 



can be used to drive your 
transmitter through a 
suitable driving circuit. The 
circuit used must take the 
TTL output and use it to 
drive a reed relay which, in 
turn, keys the transmitter- 
An example of such a cir- 
cuit is shown in Fig. 1. The 
lines which turn ANO on 
and off are located at line 
235 and line 245. Line 240 
is a call to the machine 
language sidetone routine. 

Using the program is a 
simple procedure. When 
the program is run, the 
screen will clear and the 
followfng will appear: 
MESSACE-> 

After this prompt type in 
a message for the memory. 
This message can be played 
back at any time while in 
the keyboard mode of oper- 
ation by simply pressing 
either CTRL A or CTRL B. 
The message may be up to 
254 characters in length. If 
the message contains com- 
mas, enclose it in quotes. 

The next thing to appear 
on the screen is: 
SPEED 

Type in a number be- 
tween 1 and 85. Note that 
85 is the slowest speed. The 
fastest usable speed is 
about 6. At speeds faster 
than this, the transmitter 
does not key accurately. 
When set for a speed of 7, 
the code speed as measured 
on a Kantronics Field Day 
1 1 code reader was in excess 
of 75 words per minute. 

After the above two 
items are entered in, the 
program will operate as a 
CW keyboard. When a let- 
ter is typed on the key- 
board, it is sent through the 
speaker and ANO in Morse 
code and displayed on the 
monitor. If you want to play 
back the pre-programmed 
message, hit control A or B. 
To reset the speed, use 
CTRL Z. if you want to 
change the message, hit the 
CTRL Y keys. 

I gave the following keys 
special functions: ESC pro- 
duces the Morse error code 
(eight dits), and the colon (:) 

^Se# List of Advertisers on page f74 



is the CQ key. To add a spe- 
cial function to any key of 
your choice, all you must 
do is determine the ASCII 
value of the character and 
put it on a DATA line fol- 
lowed by the Morse repre- 
sentation of what you want 
sent. For example, if your 
name were Joe and you 
wanted the computer to 
send your name whenever 
CTRL N was pressed, you 
would add the following 
line: 

DATA 19, 1333003330010 

The line number can be 
any unused one, as long as 
it comes before the end of 
data marker at line 1460. 

Because of the structure 
of this program, it is quite 
easy to make some useful 
changes. One thing that 
would be quite easy to im- 
plement would be to have 
the program output Ameri- 
can Morse instead of In- 
ternational Morse. To get 
the longer dashes used in 
Continental code, use a 4 or 
a 5 instead of a 3 for the 
dash character. This will 
limit the top speed number 
that can be entered in to a 
51. It also would be neces- 
sary to change the encf of 
line 50 to read; 
IF S * 5>255 THEN 50 




* * # 



NEW*** 




FORTHETRS-80* 
COLOR COMPUTER 

MORSE CODE 

Here's a way to turn your Color Computer Into a complete CW 
Morse Code terminal. 



'KA9FSQ CW MODEM Interfaces the computer to your 
transceiver via the ROM-PACslot. 

Cartridge: SSO.OO 

-Three CW programs to choose from. 

-KA9FS0 TRA^SLATOR (Machine language) 
TX programmable from 5-60 WPM, RX to 60 WPM, Features 
split screen operations a 255 character keyboard buffer, and 
automatic CQ using your own call letters* 

Cassette: $24.95 

-W9AV TRANSLATOR (Extended Color Basic) 
TX programmable 5-50 WPM, RX to 30 WPM. Includes 9 
message memories, and a CW practice mode which sounds 
over your TV, Cassette: $14.95 

■W9AV QSO ROBOT (Extended Color Basic) 
TX programmable 5-50 WPM, RX to 30 WPM. Use the keyboard 
or Auto Mode. Makes complete CW QSO*s without human in- 
tervention including exchange of calls, RST, QTH, and names. 
Also keeps a log. Cassette: $19.95 



For additionai information & programming, write to: 

Mike Rice KA9FSQ 
5953 N. Teutonia Ave. 
MitwaukeeWI 53209 

'Trademark Tandy Corp. please mclude 5% postage 



IMITRONIX 



p^240 



This is needed to accom- 
modate the longer dash 
character 

I hope you will enjoy us- 
ing this program. If you 
own a micro other than an 
Apple II, you can use the 

Program Listing. 



same fundamental program 
as long as your BASIC con- 
tains string manipulation 
functions. The sidetone and 
keying of the rig wilt vary 
greatly on different types of 
computers. ■ 



I 09 m PEEK £^92*tOJS REh JHfifi XnlTTEfi OFF M 


420 R* ■ " 


HI 


5 


REK iWRITTEW BY ROBERT SWIRStSY 


430 


RETURN 




10 


DIM CnDE*tl28> 


lOODi 


DATA 


'49,133330 


20 


HtJME 


1 D 1 


CATA 


50,113330 


311 


IWPUT "MESSfttE—- :)"fM«- 


lD2fl 


DATA 


51,11133d 


<K1 


IF ht ^ '■'■ THEN n* « " " 


1030 


DATA 


52,ltM3D 


SD 


HOME : IMPUT "SPEED" JS! IF S * 3 > ^^5 THEN SO 


HI4Q 


DATft 


53^11111 


60 


^^^liifit 


I05S 


DftTA 


54 r 3 L 1 1 1 


70 


PWE 7<5B,50 


1O60 


DfrTA 


55,33111 


?li 


REM I SIDE TONE 


107 


OftTA 


56,33311 


m 


POKt; 7?D,t73J F'0}<E 771 ,46: POKE 77Zpl9Z: PDKE 773,13fit POKE 774.£06t; POKE 


loeo 


DATA 


57,33331 




7?ti,5: PDKE 776,2 DAI POKE 777^11 PO^IE 77B,3S POKE 779ȣ4yJ POKE 7BD , ? 


i(i?i) 


DATA 


4B^33333 




; PDKE 7S1,201^ 


1100 


DfiTA 


32, SO 


PO 


^EJKE 7B2,208: POKE 7Q3^2'^5t POKE 754,171! POKE 7B5,0: PDKE 784,3! POKE 


111 u 


DATA 


A5, 130 




7&/,7&l PDKE 788,2! POKE 73?, 3^ PDUE 79i,9&: f'QKE 7^1 pOJ fDKE 7?2,0 


11^9 


DATA 


6&«3111D 


LOQ 


REH 


1130 


DATA 


67n313L0 


110 


GOSUG 31Q< 


1140 


DATA 


Aa+3110 


1^0 


HDHE 


1150 


D^TA 


■4 ? , 1 


130 


GET R* 


IIAO 


DATA 


7Dfll310 


1-^0 


IF AEC tR*} i: 3 THEW COSUI^ 37(J 


1170 


DATA 


7;, 33100 


ISO 


IF ASC {Rt) = 26 THEN 5D 


1180 


DATA 


72,11110 


L&Q 


IF A£d (R*) =25 THEN 20 


1185 


DATA 


47,311310 


1?Q 


iD = ftSC tl^t} 


11?0 


DATA 


73,110 


LSQ 


GtJttUfe 200 


1200 


DATft 


74,13330 


190 


CiDTD L3S 


121Q 


DATA 


75^31300 


200 


FOR K = 1 TO UEN <eODE»cDJJ 


1220 


DATA 


76,1311& 


ZXO 


Gt = WIDt (CO[JE*iD) ,){,1! 


12:^0 


DATA 


77,033[JQ 


Z20 


IF UftL tG*3 = D ThEM GOTO 350 


1210 


0<^TAi 


7&r3l0 


Z3IJ 


f'OKE 7i*r(S * { VftL (C*n> 


i2S« 


DATA 


79,0:-!33l> 


233 


X9 = PEEK <49Z4l] 


i2*0 


DAT^ 


eo,t:i;^io 


zto 


tflLL 770 


1270 


DATA 


81*33130 


215 


X9 = PEEK (4921D5 


1280 


DATA 


82,1310 


'l^a 


FOR XI ^ 1 TO 3! NEXT 


129fl 


DATA 


83,11100 


2fi0 


NEXT 


13Q0 


DATA 


84,00300 


Z?0 


FftlHT R*i 


131Q 


DAT A 


85,11300 


290 


FDR XI b i TO S * i*3! MEXT Itl 


132Q 


DATA 


86,11130 


£90 


RETURrt 


1330 


DATA 


87,1330 


3oa 


LMD 


134 


DATA 


38,31130 


310 


R£*^E) FpF* 


ISSO 


DATPi 


S9, 31330 


320 


IF F = - 1 THEN RETURN 


126JI 


DATA 


90,33110 


330 


LET CDOE*<F> = F» 


1370 


DA1A 


46,131313 


34 Q 


DOTD 310 


13QD 


DATA 


27,11111111 


345 


REH t SPACE 


i3i»a 


DATA 


13,31113 


3511 


FOR XL = t TO S K 1,7* NEXT 


140D 


DATA 


44,331133 


3^-0 


GDTQ 24CI 


1410 


DATA 


3S|l011t 


370 


FDR HI = 1 TO LEN tH*> 


1420 


DATA 


45,31113 


390 


LET Rt = HID* IH*,Ht,l.> 


J490 


DATA 


5B>31G1QQ3313. 


390 


D = ASC (Rt) 


1440 


DATA 


63,113311 


4*0 


GDBUe ::0D 


14S0 


DATA 


lit 13131 


410 


NEXT HI 


14A0 


DATA 


-lt-1 



I 



73 Magazine • July, 1983 55 



Micro McElroy 

Is Pet BASIC fast enough for solid CW copy? You bet- 
and this program will work miracles with a sloppy fist 



Q 6ta*T j 



MmALtse 



COUftTEfl 



HO 




WEFT 

yMtf46U S 
LEPt 



PNiNt 

Effnop 



VES 



VCl 




COim'TEn 



LOOKUP 
CHARACrEfli 



tgj 



ffflHT 
CHAnACT£R 



yis 




Ftowchart, 
56 73 Magazine • July, 1983 



Mike de /a DeitG VK3&HM 

79 Bedford Road 

East Rmgwood, Vic 3135 

AuiiraUa 



Most CW reception pro- 
grams are written in 
assembly language to opti- 
mize speed and efficiency. 
This is a good idea, but 
makes conversion of the 
program to run on another 
computer very difficult and 
time-consuming. Also, while 
many people are very profi- 
cient in high-level languages 
such as BASIC, not everyone 
is prepared to devote the 
time required to program di- 
rectly in assembly or ma- 
chine language. 

Haying written a routine 
in machine language to de- 
code CW on my Commo- 
dore Pet^'^, it occurred to 
me to try a direct translation 
into BASIC. Would it work? 
Surely BASIC would be too 
slow and inefficient 

The results were very sur- 
prising. The routine is very 
short (under 500 bytes) and 
handles speeds of up to 
about forty words per 
minute. This limitation on 
speed is imposed by the 
BASIC interpreter in the Pet. 
Higher speeds could be ob- 



tained on versions of BASIC 
which employ a compiler 
rather than an interpreter 
Armed with the BASIC list- 
ing and flowchart, anyone 
reasonably familiar with 
their machine's assembly- 
language instruction set 
should be able to write an 
equivalent machine-lan- 
guage program, if speeds in 
excess of 40 wpm are con- 
templated- 

The memory location in 
my Pet for input/output is 
at 59471 (decimal). With a 
key connected between pin 
L on the user port and 
ground, the value obtained 
by PE E King this location will 
change from 255 to 127. 
These values are set in line 5 
of the listing. Variables U 
and D give the values for 
key UP and key DOWN r^ 
spectivelv and variable P 
contains the input port ad- 
dress. You will need to 
change these three variables 
to match your computer's 
arrangements. 

Variables F and T deter- 
mine the receiving-speed 




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"window" and are set in line 
10, This gives a center speed 
of approximately 20 wpm 
on the Pet. As these val- 
ues will vary according to 
the execution speed of your 
computer's BASIC, I have 
not supplied a conversion 
constant or table. You will 
need to experiment with dif- 
fering values for variable F 
to obtain a constant which 
can be divided by the speed 
required to produce a new 
value for F, The algorithm 
used will decode CW over a 
wide range of speeds with- 
out altering these vari- 
ables, but word spacing will 
suffer 

If using a hand key or 
electronic keyer directly in- 
to your computer, place a 
.1-uF capacitor across the 
key contacts to smooth out 
the inevitable bounces, es- 
pecially if using a relay. 

After trying things out on 
focal copy, you will need to 
make up a demodulator to 



convert your receiver's audio 
into a signal which switches 
between ground and +5 
volts. A one-IC PLL circuit is 
a good place to start and 
will cost very little. If you 
plan to use a RTTY demod- 
ulator, disable the limiter — 
hard limiting will bring up 
the background noise to the 
point at which copy is im- 
possible Also, you will not 
be able to use your receiv- 
er's CW filter if the demodu- 
lator is set up to accept only 
the standard 2125/2295-Hz 
RTTY frequencies. This is no 
great matter, but you will 
need to set your receiver to 
a somewhat higher-pitched 
tone than is usual for CW. 
Ideally, a separate demodii- 
lator with anti-noise cir- 
cuitry, slow age, and filter- 
ing centered around ICXX) 
Hz should be used. 

The algorithm used will 
cope with odd dot/dash ra- 
tios, "swing," and other 
irregularities. However^ like 
most CW decoding systems. 



it is easily confused by very 
poor inter- and intra<harac- 
ter spacing, [f the other 
guy's CQ sounds more like 
NNMAj then it's time to put 
your headphones on and 
switch over to the computer 



Ted R. McElroy used all 
those years ago. Thaf s the 
one with enormous mem- 
ory, fantastic speed, and in- 
credibly complex I/O; you'll 
find it right under the head- 
phones! ■ 



1 REW THIS LISTING EXPANDED FOR READABILITY 

2 REW DELETE UNNECESSARY SPACES WHEN ENTERING 



10 
20 
30 
40 
50 

eo 



N=0: Q==l: F=2: T=3 
P=S9471: U=127: 0=255 

AS=" ETIANMSURWDKGOHVFILAPJBXCVZQ005 4%3FF?2 

• 8.90 *--.,U, ? 



Z=K 



GOTO 200 



A$=AS + "!,@ 16"/- .•#.?. 

S=Q 

X=N: 2^n 
70 IF PEEK (P)=D GOTO 100 
80 Z=2+Q: IF 2=T THEN X-X+Q: 
90 GOTO 70 
100 IF X-N GOTO 60 
110 S-S*2: IF X<F GOTO 130 
120 S=S+Q 

130 IF S>127 THEN PRINT ".''; 
140 K=N 

150 IP PEEK {P) = U GOTO 60 
160 2-Z^KJ: IF Z^T THEN X-X+Q: Z=H 
170 IF X>F GOTO 190 
180 GOTO 150 
190 PRINT HI0$(AS,S,Q); 
200 X=N 

210 IF PEEK fP)=U GOTO 50 
220 Z=Z+Q: IF Z-T THEN X=X+Q: 2=N 
230 IF X> F*2 THEN PRINT " ";; GCKTO 
240 GOTO 210 



i 



* • 



200 



f 



Program listing. 

73 Magazine • July, 1983 57 



I K. Davm VtJDHD 
Department of Chemistry 
University of Victoria 
Vicfofia. BriUsh Columbia 
Camda VBW 2Y2 



QRP Keyer for Misers 

Get machine-perfect code with this keyboard. 
All it costs is 30 mW and a few dollars. 



What on Earth is a QRP 
keyer? A very reason- 
able question. If you run a 
kilowatt, your keyer could 
draw five Watts, but if you 
run less than two Watts, you 
start looking for another 
keyer: a low-power, or QRP, 
keyer. Any keyer you have 
should be consistent with 
the power of transceiver 
that you are using, tn my 
case, being a convert to the 
QRP doctrine, the keyer 
must be in the very low milli- 
watt range. Specifically, the 
following design draws 30 
milliwatts and has nearly as 
many features as it has 
milliwatts. 

Well, now that you are 
reading about QRP keyers. a 



word about why a low-pow- 
er keyer was conceived. 

The project was initiated 
for two reasons: one, to have 
a keyboard for portable and 
vacation operation, and the 
other, to have a good elec- 
tronic keyer to use for the in- 
struction of a Novice class. 
My experience with teach- 
ing code using a computer 
and seeing the advantages 
of properly-sent Morse at 
known speeds and intervals 
has confirmed me as a key- 
board-keyer user. The prob- 
lem was not that there were 
no circuits to do most of the 
above, but that they each 
had some good features and 
some undesirable ones. 

In reviewing the more re- 



PhatDS by E. Grambart 




Photo A. Complete keyer with lid of case removed. 
Sa 73 Magazine • July. 1963 



cent articles, several are of 
note. KIGN^ describes an 
excellent keyboard unit 
which incorporates an in- 
structor function that is ca- 
pable of sending random 
five-letter groups with vari- 
able delay between charac- 
ters. However, the method 
of encoding the Morse char- 
acter with diodes is not ap- 
pealing. Also, the lack of 
any type-ahead buffer 
would make the sending of 
Morse for extended periods 
quite trying. 

Steber's^ Morse-a -Keyer 
has many more desirable 
features. It has type-ahead, 
it has a simple encoding 
scheme, and it was designed 
with readily available parts. 
The major drawback is the 
use of a 1702 A PROM to 
convert the ASCII to Morse. 
The ASCII keyboard, the 
PROM, and its associated 
negative voltage inverter 
consume 95% of the power 
required to run the keyer. 

K2BLA'si unit offers a 
good solution to the prob- 
lem of encoding the Morse 
characters — a scanned key- 
board. However, the limited 
capability for type-ahead of 
only two characters is hard- 
ly in the realm of a unit for 
"armchair operation." 

After this survey of key- 
boards, several criteria be- 
came apparent for a good 



port able/ instructional 
keyboard: 

• it must be low power 

• it must have a type-ahead 
buffer 

• it must have an accurate 
speed indicator 

• the buffer must have a 
useful indicator of "how 
full" 

• it must be small in size 
and self-contained 

• it should have a store 
feature for preloading the 
buffer 

• it should have an Escape 
key to quit operation if 
break is required 

• it should have an indi- 
cator for battery condition 

• it should have switchable 
sidetone 

With this list of ''desirable 
features/' the QRP keyer 
was attempted and the 
following was the result. 

The Keyboard 

The keyboard is a surplus 
unit with all the electronics 
removed. (Similar units are 
advertised in the $20'to 525 

range in this magazine and 
other amateur journals.) The 
keys, their mounting frame, 
and the PC are retained; all 
excess printed-circuit traces 
are cut away with a hobby 
knife and pliers, leaving only 
the keypads on the PC 
board. 

The pushand-lock switch- 
es such as the shift lock and 




Photo B. Logic card— located in top fight of case. 



similar functions were moved 
to the back row, as these 
are useful for analog func- 
tions which are described 
fater. After all this carving of 
the PC board was done, the 
keyboard was rewired with 
small -gauge wire as outlined 
in Table 1 . 

Fig 1 gives details and ref- 
erences for the following 
discussions. The keyboard 
encoder is a Ifrby-S matrix 
which allows for all of the 
common Morse characters 
to be encoded. Additional 
wiring is required for special 
characters and functions 
that are not encoded by the 
scanned keyboard but are 
essential just the same. 
These include Escape, 
Space. Tune, Speaker, 
Meter, and Store. The re- 
wired keyboard is intercon- 
nected to the electronics 
card by a 50-conductor 
cable. I used a length of sur* 
plus telephone switchboard 
cable, (For a description of 
the operation of a scanned 
keyboard, see Reference 4, 
as this is the probable 
source of most scanned key- 
boards) The QRP keyer's de- 
sign extends the Lancaster 
keyboard to a 16-by-8 and 
also makes it a Morse unit 
rather than ASCII. 

Type-Ahead Buffer 

A highly desirable feature 
in a keyer is the type-ahead 
buffer, providing the ability 
to type on the keyboard at 



high speed and have the 
keyer send at a slower 
speed. With this capability, 
the timing of your letters 
and spaces is not tied to 
your uneven hunt-and-peck 
at the keys. The typeahead 
in this keyer differs from 
previous units in that it has a 
segmented buffer The 48- 
character buffer is in three 
parts, each of which indi- 
cates on a meter While you 
are typing, the keyer keeps 
track of how much space 
has been used with each 
keystroke, When you are 
one-third full, the meter will 
indicate one-third full scale 
and multiples of one-third 
up to a full buffer at which 
time characters will be lost 
if you keep on typing. The 
T6-character type-ahead 
buffer in Reference 2 does 
not give meaningful indica- 
tions as it only lights an LED 
when the buffer is full; you 
are left to guess whether it 
was the last key you pressed 
or one or several before. 

I find that with the 48- 
character buffer there is lit- 
tle problem with overflow 
of the buffer. In practice, I 
type on the keyer until the 
meter indicates two-thirds 
full and then I finish my sen- 
tence and wait until the key- 
er empties the buffer to one- 
third or less and start typing 
again. 

The circuit for indicating 
the fill of the buffer is 
straightforward. The data-in 




li 



Photo C. Control panel, speaker, batteries, and sidetone/ 
relay board. 



ready flag on the 40105 
FIFO (first'in, first-out 
memory) indicates whether 
the particular 16-character 
segment is fulL If it is full, 
the flag line goes low and 
this indication is fed via an 
inverting buffer to a sum- 
ming network of all three 
FIFO segments. The summed 
voltage point of the three 
FIFOs is fed to a meter. The 
meter serves a dual purpose 



since it indicates the condi- 
tion of the batteries when 
the switch is moved to the 
Bat position. 

The Keyer 

The heart of the keyer is 
the PI SO section (paralleMn, 
serial-out). The PI SO takes 
the parallel two 4-bit parts 
of the Morse word from the 
buffer and sequentially 
shifts these bits through a 




Photo D. Keytops and meter (black keys have new tops). 

TSMagazinB • July, 1983 59 




Octal 



B 



Octal 



B 



Photo L QRP station — QRP keyer and HWS (the keyer ltd 
was removed to make a base for the transceiver). 



set of four dual flip-flops 
(ICs 10, 1 5 J9, 23Uesting for 
dots, dashes, spaces, or 
whether the last element of 
the word has been sent. The 
space character is not of 
course, a Morse character, 
but must be represented by 
some unique 8-bit word that 
can be stored in memorv 
like any other character. The 
space is not generated by 
the scanned part of the key- 
board, but is a jammed char- 
acter. It is encoded by reset- 
ting the scan register (IC2) to 
all lows and, via gates I CI la 
and lib, bits and 3 are set 
high which in effect gener- 
ates a space word. The space 
has its own keyboard strobe 
circuitry also; it is a part of 
IC6 (It would have been 
possible to generate the 
space character if a larger 
matrix for the scanned key- 
board were used, but the ad- 
ditional logic for the 
jammed character was less 
and therefore was used) 

The Wpm Clock 

The QRP keyer uses a 
more complicated clock 
than previous units. Most 
common wpm clocks are in- 
terconnected gates which 

GO 73 Magazine • July, 1^3 



reiy on RC time constants 
and are predictably non- 
linear. The clockwise rota- 
tion of a linear potentiome- 
ter to control speed has far 
too much travel on the slow 
end and is cramped up on 
the high-speed end. A log 
control was tried, but the 
improvement was not suffi- 
cient. 1 am sure you can re- 
member how important it 
was to you when you were 
learning the code that your 
instructor be able to tell you 
exactly how fast he was 
sending. Well, to this end I 
put a better wpm clock in 
the QRP key en 

A voltage-controlled os- 
cillator was used for the 
wpm timer; this type of os- 
cillator produces a linear 
scale and has nearly con- 
stant duty cycle. There is 
some slight shift in speed as 
the batteries age, but with 
good batteries you can say 
with some confidence that 
you know the speed to be 
over 10 or 1 5 wpm (or what- 
ever] for a least a year, 

Calibrafiort of Wpm 

The easiest way to cali- 
brate the wpm clock is to 

prestore the word PARIS 



E 


004 


LO 


Q 


5 


ioo 


8 


4 


T 


00& 


LI 





6 


102 


9 


4 


I 


010 


12 





AS 


104 


10 


4 










7 


106 


11 


4 


SP 


Oil 


mpm 


CLdi 


8 


116 


15 


4 


N 


112 


13 













A 


014 


14 





/ 


122 


9 


5 


n 


016 


15 





AR 


124 


10 


S 


s 


020 


e 




KN 


132 


13 


5 


D 


022 


9 




9 


136 


15 


S 


R 


024 


10 












e 


026 


11 












u 


030 


12 




4 


140 


e 


6 


K 


032 


13 




Brk 


142 


9 


6 


U 


034 


14 















036 


IS 




3 


160 


8 


7 


H 


040 


B 


2 


2 


170 


12 


7 


B 


042 


9 


2 


i 


174 


14 


7 


L 


044 


10 


2 


o 


176 


IS 


7 


2 


046 


it 


2 










F 


050 


12 


2 


Error 


2O0 








C 


052 


13 


2 


? 


230 


4 


I 


P 


054 


14 


2 


a. 


216 


7 













1 


262 


5 


1 


M 


O60 


8 


3 


^ 


320 





s 


X 


062 


9 


3 


• 


324 


2 


5 


Q 


066 


11 


3 










Y 


072 


13 


3 


o 


332 


5 


s 


J 


074 


14 


3 


* 


346 


3 


6 



Table 1. Keyboard rewiring. A — the 76 rows of the keyboard 
matriK and B — the 8 columns of the matrix. AH like numbers 
of the rows are connected together and likewise all the col- 
umns, and then each set is connected to its appropriate 
4051 scanner. 



five tinnes with spaces be- 
tween each and time how 
long the keyer takes to send 
the set of words- After tim- 
ing, apply the formula: code 
speed (wpm) = 300/T (sec). 
If, for example, the set takes 
1 5 seconds, your code speed 
is 20 wpm. 

Keying Relay and Sidetone 

The relay circuit and the 
sidetone generator are de- 
rived from earlier designs, 
but a couple of features 
have been added. The side- 
tone is now switchable. This 
allows the sidetone to be si- 
lenced when the keyer is 
used with a transceiver 
which has burttnn sidetone 
The sidetone oscillator is 
turned off at its power con- 
nection to conserve power, 
as the audio section of the 
keyer draws more than the 
logic section. 

Escape and Store Keys 

The Escape key allows 
you to abort sending if you 
hear a break or if you want 



to change that which has 
already been entered into 
the buffer. The store func- 
tion allows you to pre-type 
into the buffer, but not to 
send its contents. This is use- 
ful when you are just finish- 
ing your copy of the other 
station and you can pre-type 
in your callsigns while your 
contact is still sending the 
required identification. 

Physical Layout 

The keyer was built into 
an old but somewhat ele- 
gant box which held a tool 
kit for a chemical instru- 
ment. 1 hope you can be as 
lucky and find something 
similar. If not, a small at- 
tache case is ideal both 
from a size and cost stand- 
point. A baseplate for the 
keyer was fabricated from 
1/16" aluminum sheet, just 
big enough to fit inside the 
case. Photo A shows the 
whole unit with the cover 
on. As you can see, the key- 
board IS not enclosed. It is 
on spacer blocks ( H ") which 



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ORBIT Is the Official Journal for the 
Radio Amateur satellite Corporation 
(AMSAT), P.O. Box 27, Washington, DC 
20047. Please write for application. 

For a FREE SAMPLE COPY please 
send $1 to cover First Class Postage 
and handling to: Orbit, 221 Long 
Swamp Road, wolcott, CT 06716. 



TERM 



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SEND b RECEIVE CW tt RTTY 



Md b itatft f^^m an conwmjncttiaf* wr 

• TfftMllCAU. m. «np » UH. P^ <"» 
ytKir ivcvvsr I— iHilnwn iKfc tntf coprv 
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See List of Advef Users ^n ^9ge f T4 



73 Magazine • July, 1983 61 



^tm 




Fig. 7, QRPschemaf/c 



provide sufficient clearance 
for the PC board on the bot- 
tom of the keys and its asso- 
ciated new wiring. 

62 73 Magazine • July, 1983 



The electronics is io three 
parts: the main logic 
board -a AVi " XbVi " 
44''pin computer-type card. 



a smati perforated board for 
the keying relay and side- 
tone, and the control pao^l. 
Photo B shows the logic 



board and its connections 
to the keyboard. The small 
T6-conductor cable which 
connects together the con- 



trol panel, the card, and 
the sidetone board is on the 
lower left side of the card. 
(See Photo C for exact place- 
ment.) 

Photo C shows the con- 
trol panel which has the 
speed control, the power 
switch, the battery/buffer 
switch, the volume control, 
and the miniature key jack. 
The panel is mounted on 
small standoffs which allow 
the speed control to clear 
the baseplate. As is shown in 
Photo A, the speed control 
knob is just level with the 
top of the panel, (In effect, 
the panel is in a well cut out 
of the cover.) Size C bat- 
teries were used as space 
permitted, and annual bat- 
tery changes are desirable. 

Photo D shows the spe- 
cial keytops and the Bat/Buf 
meter. The meter was 
mounted on a small plate 
and fitted to cover the hole 
for the old keyboard en- 
coder IC which is not now 
used. The meter's place- 
ment is not just cosmetic. 



but also practical, as you 
can watch the meter easily 
while typing, as it is near the 
space bar. 

Keytops 

The keytops for the 
special kieys are worth a few 
words. 1 have made several 
other keyboard controllers 
and was always stuck on 
how to label the special 
function keys effectively, I 
have tried painting the keys 
and using presson lettering 
covered with several coats 
of lacquer, but this lasts on- 
ly several months. On this 
keyer, f tried something 
which is much better. 

The original keys were 
concave, and after roughing 
them up with fine sand- 
paper, a thin ''float" of 
black epoxy was applied. 
With a little warming with a 
heat gun (or hair dryer), the 
epoxy conforms to the 
shape of a keytop^ ^lightly 
convex but conforming to 
the top. After this was com- 
pletely dry, the keys were 




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labeled with the special 
functions using white press- 
on lettering. Next was ap- 
plied a clear "float" of 
epoxy on the lettering, After 
this was set and was lightly 
sanded to remove any drop- 
lets or uneven areas, the 
tops were polished with a 
plastic or fine metal polish, 
and "professional" keytops 
of specific designations 
were the result. 

As epoxy formulations 
vary, try the whole proce- 
dure on a small scrap of 
metal to ensure the compat- 
ibility of the epoxy and the 
lettering. I used 5-minute- 
type epoxy and allowed 24 
hours between coats. Anoth- 
er possibility is to use graph- 
ite to tint the clear epoxy, 
but I found that the curing 
time fpr the 5-minute type 
extended to 48 hours due to 
the inhibiting action of the 
graphite. If you can wait, 
you can save some money. 

Using the Keyer 

When the keyer is first 



turned on, hit the space bar 
and then a letter; this initial- 
izes the logic. I usually hit 
an E, as this gives the fastest 
check that all is well when I 
hear the dit. If you hit the 
Escape key to abort sending, 
repeat the above procedure 
as this will ensure that you 
are loading or sending exact- 
ly what you intended. 

Probably one of the most 
important things to remem- 
ber is to send only at a speed 
you can receive. The temp- 
tation will be great to send 
faster, but just sit back and 
enjoy the comfort of the 
keyer sending while you 
have a sip of coffee. ■ 

References 

1. Spindel, R. C, (KIGN), "Double^ 
Duty CW Keyboard,'* 73 
Magazine, December, 1980, 

2. Steber, G„ '^Butld a Morse-A- 
Keyer," parts I, 11, Popular Elec- 
tronics, January, 1981. 

3. Helfrick, A (K2BLA), **An Inex- 
pensive Morse Keybaard," QST, 
January, 1978. 

4. Lancaster, D., CMOS Cook- 
book, Sams & Co. 




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73 Magazine • July, 19B3 63 



Robert Schleget N7BH 
2302 286th St. East 
Roy WA 98580 



The Easy FIFO Keyboard 

First in, first out means you type as fast as you want to. 

It will send at the speed you set 



Home-brew keyboard 
designs are now readi- 
ly available and construc- 
tion need be no more costly 



than a regular keyer. 
However, some home-brew 
designs, while effective, are 
limited to the basics of 



DO 

D I 

P5 



4-fltT 
INPUT 



INPUT READY *■ 
ShfFT in — 



^2 CrtARACTER 
X 4-eiT 

Main register 



INPUT 



4-fl1T 
OUTPUT 



Mfllhf F!E:qt5TEH 
CONTROL LQmQ 



01 
{33 



OUTPUT 
UOCJfC 



SH(F7 OUT (CLOCK J 
OUTPUT READY 



MASTER RESET 



Fig. 1. The Fairchild 3341 MOS FIFO buffer block diagram. 



fNPUT 





IR SO 
SJ OP 

3341 




































1 ^ 



I R 
St 

Dl 
D£ 
ti 

MR 



SO 
OR 

Ql 



3r34! 



OUTPUT 



SERIAL STACumC 



Fig. 2, FIFO serial stacking to expand a buffer memory to 
128 or more characters. 

64 73 Magazine • July, 19S3 



character generation. The 
operator must provide the 
proper timing to maintain 
a certain conversational 
speed and rhythm. This task 
can easily be left to the 
keyboard itself by the addi- 
tion of a relatively inexpen- 
sive buffer memory. 

The Fair child 3341 first- 
in, first-out (FIFO) is a serial 
memory that operates in 
basically the same manner 
as a shift register. Data is 
entered, is shifted to the 
output, and is removed. 
However, there is an impor- 
tant difference between the 
two. The conventional shift 
register will retain data in 



(NPOT HEAOy- 
SHIFT IN' 
DO 
D I- 
D2 
D3- 
GROUMQ^ 



3341 



its first register position un- 
til additional data enters 
the system and forces the 
previously entered data to 
the next register position. In 
the FIFO, data entering the 
register is immediately 
shifted to the first open 
position at the output end. 
This feature automatically 
allow> buffering between 
two Systems that operate at 
different data rates. The 
3341 is asynchronous in 
that data input and output 
are completely indepen- 
dent. The 3341 can also 
control system speed. 

Fig. 1 is a block diagram 
of the 3341 control logic. 



i& 



14 



ii 



t? 



1 1 



■ + &VOC 
■SHIFT OUT 

■OUTPUT READY 

■Ql 
■QZ 



10 



— 03 



MAS TEA RE^T 



TOP VIEW 



Fig. 3. 3341 connectiof] diagranj. 



The main register contains 
sixty4wo 4-bit characters, 
with one 4-bit character 
contained in each of the in- 
put and output registers, for 
a total of sixty-four charac- 
ter memory positions. Infor- 
mation may ehtei^ the input 
register on the DO to D3 
inputs when both Input 
Ready (IR) and Shift In [SI) 
logic is high. When data has 
entered the input register, 
IR goes ]ow. Data remains 
in the input register a preset 
interval, at which time SI 
goes low. Data is then 
shifted into the main regis- 
ter When the transfer is 
completed, IR will go high, 
indicating that the next en- 
try may be accepted. If the 
main register is full, IR will 
stay low, blocking further 
entries, SI will now go high 
and the next character is 
accepted into the input 
register. 

Information entering the 
main register is immediate- 
ly shifted to the first open 
data position at the main 
register output. Transfer of 
a character from the main 
register to the output regis- 
ter dtfiiyrs when both Out- 
put Ready (OR) and Shift 
Out (SO) logic is low. When 
the transfer has occurred, 
OR will go high, indicating 
that information is present 
at output pins QO to Q3, 
Transfer out of the FIFO 
takes place when SO logic 
goes high, OR logic now 
goes low, followed by a low 
on SO which again allows a 
character to enter the out- 
put register. SO logic can 
be controlled by a clock to 
provide an output speed 
control, 

The 3341 FIFO may be 
expanded in sixty-four 
character steps by stacking 
individual chips. Fig. 2 in- 
dicates the serial stacking 
method. No external logic 
is required, [f character 
data of more than 4 bits is 
required, the FIFO may also 
be expanded in parallel to 
increase capability in 4-bit 
steps. In this case, external 
logic is required to ensure 




74 coo 



OtT 




H CLOCK 
{SPEED 3 



e 

DOWN COUNT 



FROM 

CHARACTER 
GENEflftTOft 
(€ B(T) 



SHJFT 
HEfilSTER 



Fig. 4. FIFO parallel stacking to accommodate an 8-bit character. Logic indicated is with cir- 
cuit at rest 



th^t the input and output 
logic on each chip is ready 
before character transfer is 
attempted. 

Refer to Fig. 3 for the 
3341 connection diagram. 
Note that both a +5-V-dc 
and a — 12-V-dc power 
source is required. 

The typical home-brew 
keyboard probably em- 
ploys either the diode ma- 
trix or the toroid transform- 
er method of character 
generation. Both methods 
generate several parallel 
data pulses, the number 
depending on the specific 
CW character, which are 
fed into a shift register. The 
shift register converts the 
parallel data bits into serial 
data bits. These serial data 
bits form the CW character. 

The FIFO is inserted be- 
tween the character genera- 
tor and the parallel-to-serial 
shift register. System speed 
is controlled by a clock in- 
put to the FIFO to control 
SO rates. A register content 
indicator is an option to in- 
form the operator when the 
FIFO is approaching full 
memory status. 

One keyboard design,^ 
recently available as a PC 
board kit, is an excellent ex- 
ample of FIFO application 
to the toroid transformer 
method of character gener- 
ation. Referring to Fig. 4, 
note that the character 



generator is 8 bits wide, re- 
quiring that two FIFO chips 
stacked in parallel be used. 
The required input logic 
begins with U1 , A high pulse 



on any one of the eight 
character bits will cause a 
low U1 output. This low is 
inverted to a high at the in- 
put of U2A. When the IR in- 



A 
UP COUNT 



DOWN COUNT 




J 



J>l SPLAY DRIVER 
CD4 5I I 




DISPLAY 
0L750 



4^ 


/-/ 

i 



Fig. 5, FIFO register content count Logic indicated is with 
circuit at rest. 



73 Magai/ne • July, 1983 65 



puts to U2A from each 
FIFO are high, indicating 
the FIFO is ready to accept 
data, the output of U2A 
goes low. This tow is in- 
verted and appears as a 
high at the SI input at each 
FIFO, indicating that data 
may enter the input regis- 
ter. This logic ensures a co- 
ordinated flow of data into 
the FIFO stack. 

Characters stacking up at 
the FIFO output are shifted 
out according to the speed 
control setting. When OR 
goes high on both FIFOs, in- 
dicating a character is pres- 
ent in the output register, a 
low will appear at the out- 
put of U2B. This low will oc- 
cur at clock speed as long 
as information is flowing in- 
to the output register. If S2 
is closed, the low is inverted 
and places a high on the SO 
pins of both FIFOs, and in- 
formation may flow into 
the parallel-to-serial shift 
register. If 52 is open, the 
low cannot be inverted and 
the FIFO will fill to capaci- 



ty. This feature allows the 
operator to pre-load a mes- 
sage into the FfFO for later 
transmission at the flip of a 
switch. The FIFO can be 
completely cleared by SI- 

A memory content in- 
dicator, while not an ab- 
solute necessity, is certainly 
a worthwhile convenience. 
The previously mentioned 
design also provides an ex- 
cellent example of one 
method of memory count 
logic. Referring again to Fig. 
4, note that up-count, 
down-count, and reset in- 
puts to the memory counter 
are obtained at points A, B, 
and C. Counter logic is 
displayed in Fig. 5. 

U3 receives and inverts 
an up-count pulse from the 
input gating. The low out- 
put from U3 inhibits a 
down-count from U4 and 
drives the output of U5A 
high. A high appearing at 
the up/down terminal of the 
display counter vyiil initiate 
an up-count, provided 
clock and carry in logic is 



low. The low from IJ3 also 
appears at the input to USB, 
which causes the output to 
go high. This high is in- 
verted and provides the 
necessary low at the clock 
and carry in terminals of 
the counter. This process is 
repeated for a down-count 
except that a low appears 
at the up/down counter in- 
put. When the count in U6 
reaches its maximum 
count, carry out logic will 
go low. This low appears at 
the clock and carry in ter- 
minals of U7, which initi- 
ates a ten count at the next 
up-count command. 

A buffer-equipped key- 
board is truly a ioy to oper- 
ate. When sending at 
speeds below your typing 
ability, just fill the buffer, 
then sit back and compose 
your next sentence. The 
down-count will tell you 
when to resume typing. You 
can easily tell when you are 
approaching speeds that 
tax your typing ability, lust 
keep an eye on the memory 



count. If you cannot build 
up a lead, turn down the 
speed control and give the 
buffer room to function. 
Quite often your contact 
will sign his call after each 
transmission. This time can 
be used to fill the buffer 
and be set to go at first op- 
portunity. 

All logic for the example 
design is readily available 
through advertisers in this 
magazine. The buffer sec- 
tion requires one each of 
the 74C00, CD4012, and 
CD4078 logic in addition to 
the two FIFOs, Currently, 
this will cost about $15, The 
two each of the CD4511, 
CD4029, and DL750, and 
the three 74C00s in the 
counter section will cost 
about $10. 

If you have a question on 
this article, an SASE will 
bring a prompt reply. ■ 

Reference 

^Skipjsick, AJR Electronics, PO 
Box 5722, EvansvHIe, Indiana 
47715. 



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66 73 Magazine • July, 1983 





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6a 73 Magazine • July, 1983 



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SCR200 Receiver Assembly 

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^CompJetflly a^mbld &. teated, w/F.T caps, 

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fAs used in ihe SCRiOOO. Ready to drop into your 
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'StmiJar to SCR200. except 420-4 70MH2 




SCAP Autopatch Board 

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73 Magazine • July, 1983 69 




international] 



Each month, 73 brings you 
amateur radio oews from 
around the woftd. In this coUec- 
tion of reports from our foreign 
correspondents, we present the 
tatestnews in DX, contests, and 
events, as ^e!t as keep you 
abreast of the technical 
achievements of hams in other 
cxyuntries. 

if you would like to contribute 
to your country's column, write 
to your country's correspondent 
or to 73: Amateur Radio's 
Technical Joumal, Pine Street, 
Peterborough NH 03453. USA. 
Attn: Avery L Jenkins WB8JLG, 




INDIA 

Tlie B<angali>re AitinieuT R^ld Club had 
^t& club nigfil on Sunday, March 12, 1983^ 
Thi£ anrtyai fund id n is sp&c^ally held lo 
bfing tiam I amities logether Thts ^SQf, ttie 
function coincidi^d wjrti ihe ?Olh bMtiday of 
OM G<rima)i VU2GX. He was given an 3u1o- 
graphed memento by all Ihe hama presenl. 
{B^& phDtos,) 

GARDEN City CONTEST 

This JS an annual ON cont&st |olnt(y 
organized by Ihe Banga Lorn Amateur Radio 
Club (VLJ2ARCI and Vlaveavar^ya Industrial 
and Technical Museum {VU2VTIVI). This 
coniQsi is @!9sentlally conducted to pro- 
mote Ih^ DX capabilities of VU2 hams> 1 1 m 
held In Ihe third we^k of December every 
year between 1200 ^MT on Saturday snd 
1200 GMT on Sunday. The frequencies of 
operaUon used are 7 and H f^Hz, 

Message Exchange: RST reporl with a 
1bree~dtg»t serial number of contact 
{599039 = 39lhconlacl}- 

EtigibtfitT' Contest ts opmn to atl ilcensed 
amateurs worldwidt. 

Type o/ Op^r&tion Single operaiof. 



Ct&sses of EntTY. Group A for VUSs holding 
grade I Itcense. Group B tor Vligs hcskting 
QfacJe It liceiise. For norv VU2 hams, r*o 
^roup classifications. 

Scoring-. Pttints earned by VUSs for maHing 
complete ti^dntact wrtti Asia, iticlifding tn- 
d^a — 1; Europe, Afnca, and AustraHa— 2 
Nort^ and South Amenca— 3. DX stations 
scof e t point for eveiy VU2 contacted. 

Ali eniff^ to the corrtest must tie post- 
mailied not later than i5fb JaniOfy and a^ 
dressed to: Ttte Convenor. Garden City 
Ccntesl Bangaloce Amateur Radio Club. 
PO Bolt 5053, Ban^ato^SeO O0t. Imba. 

TTiefe is no entry fee. True copy ol a con- 
test log must be sut>fnitted with sevidef^fi 
name, call, scJdrB^s, etc. 

The itvee lop scofers «n each ctass vtnli 
be awMded tlie winnlrvg cert^licates. Alt 
coniesiants submitiiivg vatittt \oq^ wiir atso 
receive ceniricates of pajlicipiaiicn, 




NEW ZEALAND 

Des Chapman ZL2VH 
459 Hennedy Road 
Napter. N&w Zealand 

June in New Zealand is the month when 
the shortest day occurs fslgnify^ng the 
middia of the the winter season) and also 
the month when the fsfew Zealand AssocJ- 
alion of Radto Transmitters (NZART) 
holds Jts Annual Conference and Convqn- 
ilon. It is the time when the members gel 
together to attend the Annual General 
Meeting and discuss the policies con- 
cerning the running of our Association^ 
Also held are the annual meetings ol Ihe 
yarioiis sections of the NZART: WARD. 
the Women's Amateur Radio Operators. 
OTC, the Oid-Timers Club, AREC. the Ama- 
leur Radio Emergency Corps, and forum* 
of the VHP groups, the IStovEce Radio 
Training Scheme, and the DX buffs. 

The weekend program also includes 
ptenty of soctaE- end radio-oriented actl^^ 
(ties — trade displays, trading tables tor 
hams antJ xYLs and YLs, a dinner dance, a 





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VU2RRU, VU2R0. SWL VU^QX, SiVl, V05GSW, and VU2YZ. Cent^ row. famihes 3ti<f 
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f OK hum on 2 metfifs, a mobile ratty on 6d 
and 2 meters, and, over the past couple of 
/ears, several [echnicat seminars and fo- 
ryms aa Mrtll as the usuaJ raf-chewrrvg 
that always forms part ot any ham §et- 
together. 

Tt>e venuei of tne Annual Conferences 
ara imi 9^u\ two years In advance so thai 
it>a brancti responsible tor the organiza- 
tion of the Conlerence has plenty ot ttme 
tor the planning ot it The Conference is 
heJd in a dl tie rent city or Sown every yean 
last year 11 was the turn of my hometown, 
Napter. because il was ihe 50ih anniver- 
sary ol the formal ion of the Amateur 
Radio Emergency Corps tAftEC). our emer- 
gency cpmmunlcaiion network. The 
AREC was born about ^2 months after the 
devastating earthquake whtch hit NapJer 
and the surrounding araas in February, 
1931, when Baveral amateur radio opera- 
tors, Including three within the devas^ 
laied areas, maintained emergency com- 
munkatlons for several days after trte 
rirst shocks ot the earthquake. As a mat- 
ter of mtereat. aome ol The emergenGy sig- 
nals were received in the United States 
and were the subject of an articJe in QSJ 
in 1&31 or 1932. 

As a rasuH of Iheae emergency opera- 
tions, the amateurs of New Zealand saw 
Ihe necessity tor some form ot emergency 
group Id be avatlable at any time to pro^ 



vide emergency radio eommuntcanons 
Since its inception, the AREC has as^ 
SiSied in t>un^re^s of emergency situa 
lions including eaJlhquAkes. Hoods, land 
subsidences, aircratf crashes, mouniam 
aind bush rescues, and shipping disasters 
Tfiis year"s Conteience was hekd over Ihe 
first weekend m June iwhich >is a tong hoti- 
day v^eel^end in New Zealand) at Dune^in, 
ihse main c^iy in ZL4-}ahd 

Neitf year s Cortterence is scheduled fot 
Paimersion North, a university ciiy in the 
center ot the lower h^alf of Jsiew Zealand's 
North {slan<}. The cUy has some wondsHul 
conference facilities, txsth in ihe city iiseit 
and ai ihe universMy^ and boasts of pleas- 
ant pubiic gardens and recreailonai faciJ* 
ities. Overseas visFtors are always woJcome 
at our Conferences, and we have had vis* 
ItoTs tfom VK. VE. W, and some ol the Pacif* 
fc islands in past years, So, M you are con- 
lempiating aZL holiday, what betier time to 
come to our fair land than al Ccnlerence 
time m June? it you are Interested, a letter 
to tsl^ARTormy&elf Will supply you wnnihe 
necessary Information. Even though it 'a 
winter trme, a very warm welcome awaits 
you; the winters are reasonably mild in ZL 
since only the high country areas end the 
mountains are snow areas, 

NZART NATIONAL FIELD DAY 

NZART holds an annual Fietci Day con- 
test each year during Februiary, when 




Pftora fi VU2GX pmsminng Pat iafl of VU2AUS—ex'Vt(3KHUNUt} a 6-kg waie/meton. 
others seen: VI/2GSM, MiUtti (SWU VU2HAH. ami VU2UV 



70 73 Magazine • July, 1983 




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NZAflT bfaiK;h©5 go f)oi1ab4e in the fwld. 
The contest is over two days, Saturday and 
Sunday, tHe operating periods being from 
1500NZST to a400N2ST, Saturday, and 
O&OONZST to 1500NZST. Sunday, and the 
frequencies used am 8D and 40 meters, CW 
ajid phor^e. 

Be Id- Day stations must operate from a 
portable po^er supply, It\ a teni of traHer 
(caraifar^ii, Of soine other pprtati^ location, 
e.g . a car or mobile home^ on antennas 
erected for the Field Day no earlief than 
1200NZST on Saturday. 

Our Field-Day contest this year was one 
o* the most succes^Fut fof some time in alL 
over Setiranch stations opetateddunng the 
two day^. out of a possible 80 branches. 
Contacts are on phone and CW in each 
hourly period, with points allotted for con- 
tacts and multiplier points tot the number 
ot tvanctves worked on each ttand and 
mo<Je. Some overseas contacts are admis- 
alble, wiih stations jn VK and some of the 
near Paciftc Islands onSy. 

My local branch station was set up on 
the tjanks of the Tutekuri Uiv^, about 3 
mflsa fTom the center o' town, Tlie station 
was set up Jn a tent ani^ a mobile camper 
We used tall poplars about 1 20 feet high for 
anter^na supports, piac^rkg pitot Iine$ over 
Ihe top ot the trees with a surf^c«$ting rod 
and ime. We had 80- and 40'meter dipole? at 
about 30 teet, a delta loop on 40 meters, 
and a I on 9 wire about 500 meters long 
acr^^ the river as ouf othef SO-meter 
antenna. 

The team tiad 1500 cpntacl6* for 181 
multipliers^ giving us a total of just over 
1.000.000 pomts; we did not think that we 
were trie winners, as there were tvifo Of 
three teams ahead; of utt! T?ie station i^as 
operated from the ctub's portable mot Of 
generator, supplying 330 votts to the tour 
rigs used J a Kenwood TS-930S, a Yaesu 
FT' 101. a Vaeiu FT 901. and a FTDX- 
401— a fig on each of tti* modes on the 
two bands used, 

I tiope to be able to include some of the 
photographs taken at Field Day locations 
in a future column to illustrate the^imitar- 
ity between otir Fie Id Day exercises and 
^ours {wherever you llvej. as hams around 
the world have a lot 1n common cortcem- 
ing our hobby, 

SITS N^ PIECES 

June was thediamorvd jut>ilee for one ol 
New Zealand's original ham operators. 
Dan Wilkinson ZL2AB. who was aliottad 
his calls ign in June of 1923. Hifi was the 
thifd to be granted, and he stHI hotda the 
same original call today. Who lenows, that 
could be some sort of a record. Incidentally, 
the first call was Issued to Jack Orbell 
3AA, and tH was 4AB» the Dtago Radio 
Society. Another earJy celt issued in 1923 
was lAC to Len Spackman. ar>d he. too, 
stfl! holds that same callsign and Is active 
an the Old-Timers Club Net so his dia- 
mond jubilee will be dua rater this year. 
Oan ZL2AB «s also Heard regularly on the 
Old'Ttmers Met on Sunday mornings on 40 
meters. 

AREC PHItATEUC COVERS 

A small quantity of special commemo- 
rali^ve philatelic povers ts available. Issued 
10 commemorate the 50th anniversary ot 
the foundation of the Amateur Radio Emer 
gency Corps, the covers were postmarked 
with a special cachet in June of last year, 
at the time of the Annual Conference and 
Convention. They are ur^sddressed and 
will be sent undar a separate outer cover 
to g^voi^ damage. 

Please ser^d 6 IRCs for one cover by 
return Ziid class airmail. Serid eppllcft* 
tipns to Napier Branch 25, NZART, PO Box 
4G30, Napier, New Zeatand^ 

72 73 Magazine • July, 1983 



ox NEWS 

Chathem ishftcfs . . .Allan ZL2&KM has 
been operating from the Chatham Islands 
since April and will continue until August 
23, 1933, ail t>anos. CW and phone. Allan 
is a radio operator to the New Zealand 
Post Office, and he is doing a tour of duly 
at the Chatham Island Coast Radio Station 
run by the N2 Post Office. Allan's ng is a 
Tft-430S. When he leaves the Chat hams, 
he will tie traveling to the Slates with a 
group of New Zealand hams to attend the 
Seattle NEZCHEQ get-together over the 
US Labor Day weehencl. September Z^ 

Niu^ r«/ancf.-- Peter ZL21K Jnas taken 
the positf&n of Director of Telecommuni- 
cations, f^iue, a two-year tour of duty 
which started in mJd-May, Peter is a 160 
buff and will be endeavoring to work 
OXCC on 80 anil Jf It is |>osstble, 160 dun 
tng his stay in Nuie. He also will operate 
on the other HP Dands. His rig Is an 10-720: 
he will be ZK2IK. 

Also operating from Nuie at present are 
Iwo othef ZL operators^ Bob ZK2RS and 
John ZK2JS> botn letecommunications 
technicians on lours of duty tn the is- 
lands. Both of these operator! a re also ac 
tive on the HP bands, and when these two 
are joined by Peter, they probafily will 
make quite an Impact on the OX front So 
the DX boys will be sure of Nuie iMir^g ac^ 
tive for some time in the future— at least 
until 19a5 when the present ZL^' tours of 
duty will fmish. But then let's hope more 
hams liQfn ZL will take their places when 
I hey return to New Zealand. 

Penrhyti tsfartd .. .Warwick ZL3AFH 
has been active operating from Penrfryn. 
In the Northern Cook Islands. asZKIWL. 
He will operate until some time around the 
middle of this. year. 




KOREA 

CPO Box 29t5T 
Seouf Korea 

In the spring, a young ham's iancy turns 
to operaiing portable! l^oreans are natu- 
ral Dutdoorsmen and love to climb rocks 
and mountains, camp at the seashore, 
and generally commune wllh nature. A 
dream situation tor a y^ong Korean ham 
might be camping in the mountains with 
his favorite rig and perhaps YL Realising 
that dfeam, however, has been a difficult 
thing for Korean ham$, 

In the past, portabFe^mobile operation 
required permission trom the MOC (Kore- 
an Ministry of Com (nunicait ions) In the 
form of a special caiisign, but such opera- 
tion was possible. An impor!ant restric- 
tion was that operation was not permitted 
In certain area^ near the demilitarifed 
fone (DMZ) that separates the hostt^ 
states ot the Republic of t^orea and North 
Korea, for obvious security reasons. Well, 
no matter where you go, there Is a "wrong- 
way Chartje," and Korea is no exception, 
Violation of tfiis Imboo by a single ham re- 
sulted In cance Matron oT the privilege for all 

Extorts to regain the portable/mobile 
privilege are expected to conie to fruition 
sometime thia year, VHP handie-talkies 
are popular here but nave been protribiied 
tor use outsJde the shack. Most 2Hneter 
PM operation is with Japar>ese mobile- 
type transceivers^ so the changeover to 
mobile operation wouli^ be easy. Along 
with the question of perrnitting pcir- 
table/mobile operation in Korea, the MOC 
ia also considering rssuing licenses for 
repeaters. In Korea's mounlainous ter- 



rain, repealers are a naceasriy lor serlo^js 
mobile work. 

When portabla/mobiie operation Is fi- 
nally a reaHiy, it will have been Jn no small 
part t»ecause of the efforts of Mr. t.ee Hee 
Soo HL1B0. one of the pioneer hams tn 
Korea and several-times director of the 
KARL. Ho has devoted much of his lima 
and energies to regaining those phvi- 
teges. He was instfumental in setting up 
the KoHrean National f^ed Cross Fegional 
club station system for use in time of na- 
tional disaster and introducing the con^ 
cept of amateur radio as a public service 
rather than a self-serving hcibby Much ot 
this work has served to cortvmce the 
Korean authoritms of the vaiueot amateur 
radio to society and encouraged them to 
tlberaiiie the rules and regulations apply 
ing to amateur operation. A 73 In tern a^ 
tionml salute to HLlBO> 

Muctt confusion regarding QSL Bu- 
reaus took place when the Korean hams 
changed over from HM to HL prefixes as a 
result of the 1973 WARC. Until that time, 
only lis Forces/United Nations Command 
personnel used !h© HL prefix. To further 
complicate things, at about the same 
time, the USPK/UNC QSL address changed. 

Pol lowing is the correct Information: 
HL9 $tatit>rt$ — American Amateur Radio 
Club of Korea, c^o OepenOent Ma^f Sec- 
tion ^ APO San Prancisco CA 96301; all 
other HL stations (1,2,3,4,5,8,0)— Korean 
Amateur Badio League, CPO Box 182, 
Seoul, Korea, 

One final note, when signing with a 
Korean station, if you really want that O&L 
card. /?ever say Ssyanaral Koreans are 
completely different people from the Jap- 
anese, The correct farewell wojuld be Aj^n^ 

Well then, Ah n young and 73 from the 
Land of the Morning Calm. 




CANADA 

(Reprinted from the CARF News Service 
Radio News Wo, 7f83 by p&rmis$mn ot the 
Canatf/Sfl AmateufRadto fedsraUon. ^rrcj 

As tt>e old saijring goes, you win some« 
you lose some, and here's some proof. 
The same Privy CouncH Office which held 
up proposed license increases so long 
tl\at tlicy coutd not be Imptemenied tf*ts 
year has been sitting on proposed revh 
siors to the amateur regs since last May. 
The proposed changes which surfaced a 
coupEe of weeks ago were some Of those 
whicti resulted from r«oommendations 
made to DOC (Department of Communlce' 
lions) by amateurs at the 1981 CARP Sym^ 
posium. Included were revisions which 
would lift power restrictions on t60 
meters, permit repeaters on 10 meterB. 
alloiAr European amateurs to use ait of the 
two-meter band while operating in Can- 
ada under a reciprocal operating agree^ 
ment, and redetFne permitted bandwidth^ 
for AM, FM. FSK, and ATV OOC hopes 
that now that these drafts which It had 
submitted to the Privy Council have tfeen 
found, they wili be approved fairly soon. 

Brilish Columbia amateurs were Involved 
in a novel way in the recent Royal Tour ac- 
tlvftjes m Vancouver. During the cere- 
monies cor^nected with the Mpcoming 
19S4 World EKposlMon, held in the r^ew BC 
Place, the Queen's speech on March 9 
was relayed by a ^50-MHz link to Van^ 
couver repeater VE7RPT and retrans- 
mitted on 20 and 40 meters. To martf the 
event, BC amateurs were allowed lo use 
the prefix KO, A special 03L card la avail- 



able to listeners who report hearing the 
broadcast. VE7 stations who used the XO 
prehx can obtain a special QSL card free 
from the BC govemmenL 

TOl^Ef^S COLLAPSE 

Tha worst ice storm In Manftoba's 
history hit in early March and put Brandon 
and Batdy Mountain repealers out of bu«^ 
fim& when the broadcast towers holding 
their antennas collapsed. Many amateurs 
lost their antennas and some had the 
tough luck to lose their to we re as welL ac- 
cording to VE4MG. 

CORDLESS TELEPHONES 

The cordi^ess telephone, like CB radio, 
1$ rapidly becoming a fad, and like CB 
radio, it already poses problems for ^ma- 
leurs. QRM from these devices is already 
showing up from their harmonics m the 
40- and 80-meter bands and aomie of mem 
are, according to a US source, being 
crystalled in the l^-meter band. DOC is 
currently working on some regulations 
concerning ttiem. Just to complicate the 
scerie, ttiere ts apparently a 35 Watt am 
puller now on the market. The phones 
themselves operate duplex, uaing 49 me- 
ters and 1 .6 to 1 .8 *AHi, althougtt the laiter 
sJoi is going to the broadcast-band ex pan - 
$Jon in a couple of years. These things 
work weli, but the Consumers' Associa- 
tion of Canada points out ihat with some 
models which have dial-C4Jt facilities, His 
possible to<3cce&s anotfief telephone line 
and rack up toti-tine charges on it 




BRAZIL 

Catfos Vfaana Carnmro PYJCC 
fltia Afonso P&na 49, Apt 707 
20270 Rio d^ Janeffo, RJ 

TL FROM BRAZIL 

Need a "sure QSL ' from Brazil? Looi^- 
Ing for a YL contact for your VL award? 
Wetiv all you h^^e to do is come to 14.24B 
kHz eveiy Wednesday from igoo to 2100 
UTC and Join the 8RYLA iBrazilian YU h&L 
The net has existed since March, 1&76, 
and is directed by Inge PV2Jy. The net at- 
tracts VLs from all of the Brazilian states 
<m both SSB and CW 

Inge has held her license only since 
1971?, but she tell so in los/e with amateur 
radio that she r?ow ha^ 2^ countries and 
holds this BRYLA net to stimulate DX op- 
erallons with Brazilian Yl_s and to spread 
the BRYLA Award to aM places and conti- 
nents. 159 ot these awards have been sent 
to 35 countries of the H35 countries filed 
by the net. 

Usten to PYTYL PYtAfP. PVILMS. 
PY1MF. PVIDVO, PT2ML. FT^SV. PT2LS. 
PT?TF. PT2DCR. PY2ATL. PY2DL2, 
PY2FU PY2JY. PY4AKL, PYdML. PY4DY, 
PY4RA, PYSACR. PYSSZN, PY7AVN. 
PV7VBG. PVaSSa/7. PSSYL. and many 
others on the BRYLA net, an<j most of the 
requirements for the BRYLA Award will b« 
fuiritled. 

The BRYLA Award was created by Ther- 
ezinl^a PT2TF. and it is greats DX stations 
must prove a two-way OSO with 12 YLs 
from different countries on three con- 
tinentSi plus BYL stations from Brazii— on 
any band, any mode, and all QSOs trom 
1 07S on are valid. 

The tog must be ceriitie<l by a r»dto 
association and must include the station, 
date, time, mode, report, and band. SWLs 
also may qualify. Send OSLs for files and 



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meters or 10/6/2 meters. 

^ high 0ain 1/4A for mobilB/ 

hand ie app 1 1 oat ions. 

There's more* See your KLM deafer or 
write for a catalog. 
KLM Electronics, Inc. P.O. Box d16, 
Morgan HMl CA 95037 {408)779-7363 * 



^See Usf of Aifverfisers on page t U 



73 Magazine • July, 1983 73 



10 mCs 10 BRYLA, ctoZiza PT2LS. PO Box 
07/0004, 7D0OO Brasilia. DF. Brazil South 

On thfi BRYLA net. you can lind Eva 
py2PE. DXCC HoflOf Roll membei. Tessy 
PS6VL ancT Manlia PY4AKL who both 
ttwomore than 300 f^Ountnss, Irge PY2JY 
witll ^0 count fies, sntf PYZADI *im 172 
courimes, Zirs is BRVLA Award Manager 
with hundire<J:s of lirslHCla^iS awards in- 
cluding b BRYLA Awards which wsns en- 
dorsed all CW. 

When propagation Ift fine, Japan, 
Hawaii, New Zealand, Ausiralia, and 
many other firsi-clasis DX etafiof^s are 
available^ 

A general CQ Is called almling the beam 
to South Africa, AsJa, or Europa. and traf- 
fic is passed just like other International 
nets. Each YL^s hsted and onetjyone they 
OSO Ihe Qttief participants. No "chats" 
ar£ allowed during thfrse two hours so all 
calls can be answered. Only a call artd re- 
port will be given by each VL. 

Another very lunny award was created 
by Inge, the WBYL (War Red Si-azilian YU 
Award; and it has been Dttered since the 
ftrst day of I3fl1, with the first request 
coming h-om South Africa. Jysi contact 8 
Braziliafi YL stations and forrn the words 
"BRASfL YL" using any one tetter from 
each suffix. One of the YL stations niust 
be a PY2. Any band, any mode, The stan- 
dard log is required. Including station 
worked, date, time, mode, report, and 
band. SWL entries are aJso accepted. 
Send QSLs with 10 (RCs for return post- 
age to Inge Tobias de Agular PY2Jy, Rua 
Texag 448, D45&7 Bro<>klin Novo. Sao 
Paulo, Brazil. South America, 

Infie IS so enthusiastic tor radio, she 
wss the first YL to operate VHF from a hot- 
air balloon flying oyer Sao Paulo, on 
August 16, 1974. Stie was with tief hus- 
band Jose F^2JO and Vitono Trutti, bal- 
kKDnisi and proprieioi. 

She also paftieipated in two DXpedi- 
tions to Afvoredo isfams m 1975 and 1^0 
This island is the most beautiful small 
tsFand in the wortd an<t is located at 46* 
10' W anct 23 * 5B' S, 1 76 miles from Rio de 
Janeiro. It was developed and maintained 
by Fernando Edward Led, 

There are hundreds of birds and fishes 
wfiJch come from disiani places to the 
Island. The island also has the largest 
wind alternator In the world, a lighthouse, 
solar water heating, a ramwater reservoir 
with a VmH I ion-liter capacity, and coco- 
nut treies which give 12^000 liters of coco- 
nut milk eacii year. There rs also a TO-lon 
crane which can easily lilt a 3 ton yacht 
into a speciaify-designfd tank. Paradise 
On £ar|h. says Inge. 

A new net is being pldnn^d ftnd studied 
fof 142B3 kHz on Wednesdays at 3330 
UTC, it will tie beaming toward the USA 
and Canada, 




LtBERiA 

Bmttter Dona/tf, Swffes, CS.C. 

EUAUWedHfY 

Brottwrs of fioty CfQ$S 

Si. PBtrick Htgh SqUqqI 

POBox f06B 

A^onmiria, BBpubifc of UtBtia 

Libeha is on itie westernmost point of 
the great continent of Afrtca, Most of the 
country is nearly at sea level, although 
there are parts of the in tar tor that rise to 
somewhat over a thousand feat. For what- 
ever reason, the amateurs In this GOuntry 
enjoy exceUent communications condi- 



tions wJth the United Stales, all oj Europe^ 
antt in the direclion of Russia during the 
greater part of the year It seems to be well 
situated geographi^Daily artd it is 'n the 
GMT time^one. 

The amateurs in the country number 
less than a hundred and most are not 
nativfli. The reason for this situation is 
^Imfily that Africans have had htl^eoppor' 
tuhlty to leafn amateur radio and, for the 
most part, they do not have the money to 
purchase and operate radio equipment. 
Very tew of the cities have eHectrlcai 
power and those that do have It for only a 
pari of the day. 

The Llberian Amateur Radio Associa- 
tion (LARA), under the direction of Mr. 
Benjamin Walcott, is doing everything in 
Its power to reverse those statistics, 
Radio Classes arc being run In increasing 
numbers and the response is very gratify- 
ing. In Monrovia, a course Is being taught 
currently at St. Patrick Htgh SchopL and 
the turnout ts over a hundred persons oi 
all ages and includes both men and 
women. Ttiese classes o|>efate under 
great dilficuity since leittbooJts are not 
available and things like code osciftators 
are rare, The stiidents must rely on da^s 
notes and on dupticated pages which are 
prepared and haruJed out by the instruc- 
tor. Many of ihe people have tape re- 
corders, which area great help. 

When the siu dents are licensed, there 
Is the problem of equipment for them to 
use. The association plans to gradually 
set up club stations in strategic areas so 
that ihose who do not have Iheif own 
equipment may have access to a dub sta- 
tion. At the present time, there is one such 
club station m operation. The equipment 
lor Ihese club stall on s will have to come 
trom arnateur friends in other parts of the 
world. The statior^ which ts presently bp«r- 
ationai was donated by a rad^o club in 
Barberton, Ohio, 

The Te4ecommuni cat ions Ministry hara 
in Monrovia has neitfier the personnel n^r 
(he funds to test and evaluate applicants 
for amateur licenses. The government 
relies on the LARA to do this job tor them. 
The LARA Instructs persons Interested in 
amateur radio, tests them, and whan they 
have met the requirements, recommends 
them to the Ministry for licensing. This 
system Is working remarkably well and 
Ihe cost to the government Is minimal 

Amateur radio in Liberia is proud of Its 
record of performance in times oi emer- 
gency and disaster. It measures up to ihe 
high standards of amateur rad^o around 
the world, and it is the aim of the LARA to 
expand the numbers of operators^ irv 
crease amateur activity, and at tha same 
lime maintain the high standards at which 
it now functions. 

(Beoittef Oanard is Secretary tyt the 
Llb^fian Amateur Radto Associa- 
Uott —Ed.} 



^\^ 



GREAT BRITAfN 
J9tf Alayrrai^ G4EJA 

Wittn^S WAS 9fiP 
Chi^^fitf€, Bngtand 

The continuing growth of interest in 
amateur radio in the United Kingdom was 
evidenced receittly wti«n the Radio Soci- 
ety of Great Britain {RSGB) held a Na- 
tional Amateur Radio Convention at the 
National Exhibition Center f\t&f Birming- 
ham. The NEC Is a prestige exhibition and 
conference canter with its own airports 



railway station, and hotel complex situ^ 
ated more or less In the canter of England 
and weit served by motorways {freeways^ 
I had previously visited NEC for trade 
shows auch as Communications B3 and 
the Intefnationai Business Show ar>d had 
found partting easy and queues minimal 
Not so w^th the BSGB, wtio, although us- 
irvg a hall of adequate size, had ajranged for 
only two ticii,6t counters W t>e open. This 
meant a wait of some twenty minutes in a 
fresh breeze which at least stiarpened our 
minds for the coming fray. 

The malorlty of major inn porters were 
e)(hibiting the latest in Japanese micro^ 
processor-conlrolied black t?oxes. I Iried^ 
unsuccessfuHyt to find a new rig that per- 
formed better than my FT-101 rather than 
just outdid II in numbers of knobs. There 
are no longer any indigenous manufac- 
turers of HF gear in the UK However, we 
do have some able representatives in the 
speciahst sc^ne including^ Microwave 
Modules and Wood & Douglas. MM dis- 
played ns rar>ge of transverier^ tor 2 
meters and 70 centimeters, iDgethaf with 
linear amp 1 1 hers for these and higher 
bands. Perhaps thdlr most innovative 
product tand one that always attracts 
attention) is itie Morse Talker This micro- 
processor^cont rolled device sends ran- 
dom Morse at a user-selected rate and 
then speaks the letters sent for the pupil 
to check his copying. As an option, the 
model two will Jnlerpret (but not comment 
upon I) pupil-sent Morse. 

Wood & Douglas exhibited a range of 70 
cm^ 2s 4 . and S-meter kits, and modules 
for the constructlon-mmded operator. As 
well as traders, trie exhibition hall included 
the various support groups Such as the 
BSGB (showJng its extensive range ot 
boohs), AM SAT- UK, seiring ttwnew^ypub^ 
lis had Tecfifiicat Handtmok, Navy and Air 
Force Amateur Radio Societies, the Radio 
Amateiir Invalid and Bedfast Ciub. and 
BARTG (Ihte Bfittsh Amateur Radio Tele- 
pnnler Croup). 

With most of the stands 5 deep in ex- 
cited people clutching for ieaflets. it was 
something of a relief to take a break lor 
lunch. This Is an area in which we have a 
little to learn from the US. The choice at 
NEC was to queue lor half an hour for a 
very soggy beefburger or (as we did) walk 
over to the attached Metrdpole Hotel and 
pay Over the odds for an average meal. 

Many believe that the intense interest 
in amateur radio is a spin-oti from the 
recently legalized CB service (27 MN2. f M, 
4 Watt s^ which many ate finding frustrat- 
ing at^d uninteresting isurpnse, surprise!). 
Lots of ex-CBers are furtously studying for 
the radio amateurs' exami nation, which 
twice yearly opens the doors to those 
answering the questions correctly, 

Some early problems with CSers 
Spreading into the tOm band have now 
largely disappeared. My own local COw- 
boy was discouraged from using 23,1 for 
SSB by some ZOO-Watl RTTY tests I ran! 
There Is, however, some worry over here 
about the IDm band and Its lack of use 
during quiet sunspot periods. Moves are 
afoot to encourage FM around 29.6 for 
moblle-to-mobile working (many 2m re- 
peaters are very busy indeed) 

Cheap CB rigs {S25.00 to $50,00) ar^ b^ 
Tng snapped up and converted from 27 to 
se MHz quite easily. Although low In price, 
some of thesa ere from weif-known names 
such as tcom and offer a range of facili- 
ties including 40 channefs^ 

The RSGB is encouraging 10m usagf by 
pFOmotir\g a new 26- MHz Counties Award. 
This requires confirmed contacts on 10m 
{any mode) with 40 UK countiesiScottish 
regions from the total of 77. Contacts 
must be madd after April 1^ 1983, The 
award is free to RSGB members and $3,00 
to others. 




FRAKCE 

CtaifdeGueefiOOY 
f I Rue Emffe ta4»cfte 
28t00 Df^ux, France 

2M FM REPEATERS 

About 25 F^ repeaters are located In 
France. Placed on 15 channels in 25-kHz 
steps, they can be found between 144.726 
and 145,175 MH^, with a -i- SOO-kHz offset. 
ERP Is between 20 W and 20O W. Some are 
very busy. 

7(KCM FM REPEATERS 

France has about 10 of these repeaters 
Present channels of the machines will be 
moved, but all have a - ISOO-MH^ offset, 

AWARD: DlPLOMl VILLE D£ PARIS 

fHF bands: Class 1— oontact 20 arron- 
dissements. Class 2— contact 15 arron- 
dissements. Class 3— contact 10 arrorK 
dissements. All contacts after January i. 
1346, A log book certified by an otf icer of 
the national organization Is required. Fee. 
30FF(|RG). 

For YL: ^0 arrondissements, or 20 for 
"diplomed'honneur." 

Diplome manager: Bernard Louis F5BL, 
15 Piece d'Allgre, 75012 Paris. France, 

WORLD COMMIiNICATlONS YEAR 

For this event, French stations are au- 
thorized to use a TO prefix, 

SATELUTE ACTIVITY 

RACE (BadfO Amateur Citib de I'Es- 
pacej is support »ng ARSENE (Arrane Ra^ 
dio Amateur Satellite Enseignement Es- 
pace^. This satellite is sche^iuled to be 
launched by Ariane IV by the end of 1985 
Two modes are planned: B and F j2.4 GHz 
and 435 MHz). The orbit will be an equato 
rlai ellipse. The president of RACE is Fazs 
and the vice president is FBYY. 




SWITZERLAND 

Peter W. Fmy HB9MOM 
^ Box If 27 
CH-54Q1 Baden 
Switiefland 

As in mml Otti^r Western countries, 
repeaters are an important aspect of ama- 
teur radio In Switzerland. However, in the 
last couple of years, many amateurs in 
this courttry have grown increasingly 
skeptical about what some call "garbage- 
tn-garbage-out machines." They charge, 
for example— not enlkeiy unfounded— 
that repeaters tend to promote bad oper- 
ating practices and that the difference 
between what you hear on 27 MHz and on 
145 MHz has t^ecome rather mar^ioal. 
Monitoring a 2-meter repeater like HB9Af4 
near Zurich, tti« biggest Swiss city^ for a 
day can mdeed be a frustrating ex- 
penence: QSOigi abOurid with CB-type lingo 
and their content Is only too often in vioia^ 
tion of the ruPes. (Remember, for example, 
that third-party traffic of ar\y kind is an ab^ 
sofute no-no in almost all of Europe I) 

So far. reiwater jammers in Switzerland 
haven't ttad to fear much in terms of get^ 
ting caught. Some repeaters, likeH69Fon 
top of Mount Sohilthorn [known to James 
Bond 007 movie addicts as "Piz Gloria "| in 



74 73 Magazine • July, 1983 



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>^See tvsf 0/ Adverftsers on page f t4 



7B Magazine • July, 1983 75 



Itie Bernese Db«rl«n(ior HB9RW qn lop of 
ihe P^rpanef Rothofn in the etouthfrasleirrt 
part oi the country, ajie ^ityatBd «ell 
alK»ve 9000 feet. They cover a great pait or 
Switzerland and conttderabie portions of 
rtelghboitng coyntfies, thus mahin^ li a 
rather difficult task to locate and traclt 
down a lammer, Or^ lop of that, the radio 
survefllance peopte ol the 5wiss PIT can't 
provide as much help as the amateurs 
Bometlmea expect. They are facing 
enough problertis aiready In cppInQ with 
the messy 27-MHz situation in ihis 
country. 

For ihe o11iclal$ of ihe Sii^^S9 national 
soccety. repeaters are a constant irem on 
Ihe agenda. It's tt^ business of repeater 
coofdinatmg thai sometimes {jivi^ them 
f^eadachea If you thought repeal tf (toof- 
dtnatmg mras difficult m the US, imagine 
iust how n IB to coordinate repeater fre- 
qyencies wherr socielies and atithorities 
of some five countries are involved* 

The ^-meter band plan o( the Interna' 
tlonat Amateur Radio Union Region T 
(Europe, the Soviet Union^ and Africa) pro* 
vides only for len repeater chan nel s desig- 
rated R{i to R9 with inputs located t^e- 
tween 14&.IXK1 MHz and 145.225 MH; and 
outptJtsfiOO iiHi higher ¥oy don't need to 
be a repeater^ovefage expert to see thai 
It Is close to impossible to cater io all 
wishes with only leu channels available. 
Therefore, repeater problems are an 
everyday fare for the VHF managers of 
Europe's national ^ocie1}es^ 

A few years ago, one could even wit- 
ness a ■ repeal er war'' in Central Europe. 
The French national society unl late rally 
dedded Io pul Into oparaiton a £:Ouple of 
repealers on frequency pairs well apait 
from the internal lonaJ I y-agreed-on chan- 
nels and with inputs right in the midc^^ ol 
Ihe 2-meter- beacon band. The Austrians 
closely followed suit. Tti rough a lot of 
negotiating across country t>ordefs and 
S:huffltpg arour^d Of channels, ttie problem 
IS ncpw m itie process of bemg resolvedl. 
However, when you're experimenitng w*th 
HB9VV. the tleapower (36 mW?| S-meter 
cajibrattng beacon on Zurich's Mounl Uto. 
you still siand a good chance thai your 
test is rendered useless because ot con- 
stant interference. The Input ot an 
Airsirian repeater on f^ouni Valluga just 
across the border is on e^cactly fhe same 
frequency, 



I 






DENMARK 

Hsnne NiEfsen OZICiD 
Hvidovrevei 4$8 
2650 HvmoVf& 
D^nmsr*i 

In Denmark we are BDOO rBdio amateurs 
AFlfong. and about 7000 are members of 
EDU <Ejcperirr^enterende Danske Ra^io^ 
amattfrerf Under £DR we have €iO loca^ 
drvisrons of varying size. 

Tbe Copenhagen Division, or as we catt 
it. club, is the biggest, with 300 members. 
We have our own house bought in 1t74 
The clut3 was founded in 193S and we have 
lust celetirBied our 50th jubilee. 

During the week, we have many activ- 
ities. Monday evenfngs we have ft com- 
mon meeting with lectures upon different 
technicat sides of Our hobby and after- 
wards comfortable talks over a cup of COl- 
fee arKi some ea tabids. Of eoutse. tfie 
ctub station is on the air with the call 
OZ5EDR. 




Ths EDR Copenhsgen Dtvi&fon QTH. 



Tuesday we have laboratory evening, 
where members can receive technicat 
assistance for the^r problems with sta- 
tions or construction projects or. as a 
group, we start seme new ptojects. Four 
to f Eve d ay s every week , except i n ttte su m- 
mer time, we have technical courses and 
CW courses tor those who want (o have a 
license or upgrade meir present license. 

In the clubhouse, vve have a laboratory, 
library. VHF/ilHF shack, HF shack, in- 
str^ictibn rocm, office, dining room, three 
apartmehlS for leasing Io members^ a 
workshop, material; rooms^ and a newly 
esiablished museum tor radio amateurs. 
Outside Ihe house, we have an antenna 
mast With HFA/HF/UHF beamS- 

Many weekends we join Into ttie tfitter- 
ent national and tnternatioital contest son 
both CW and SSB Joining in Field Days 
and Ihe JamtKKee on the Air are also 
some ot our activiti'es. We also do a ktt in 
award hunltng. Ttiat special side of our 
tiobby hasn't been going on for more than 
4 years, but through many QSOs and a 
fine award manager, we now have got 104 
different awards decorating our walls^ 
many from T3 magazine. We have also 
founded 2 awards: The Copenhagen 
Award founded many years ago, and the 
OZ Prefix Award founded on the occasion 
of the 1982 jubilee 

T^:^e house we own rs very old Every 
weekend some members worit on it as 
there is always something lo do and we 
are rm^ able to pay workers from out side- 
It's very nice, as a chairman » to see that 
our riobbyK amateur radio, is flowering, not 
only in The Copenhagen Division of EDR, 
but everywhere. If any radio amateur In 
the USA should visit Copenhagen, you 
would be very welcome to visit our club. 




SWEDEN 

ftuiie Wande SMBCOP 

S' 155 00 Nykvam 
Sweden 

SCANDINAVIAN HORIZON 

"Do you always carry your radio with 
you whenever you travel?" the customs 
lady asked me at Logan Airport in Boston, 
Massachusetts, when I unloaded the two 
40-pound boxes with ham gear in addition 
ID our 5-per5on tamtty luggage. 'Yes. t at> 
ways do,' i replied, and she let us pass 
through. 

Most of us hams like to hav« our radios 
with us when we travel. It sure is fur^ toeu- 
parlance how the bands sound at a distant 
location frorn home. A Z-meter FM hand- 
held can give you lots Of opportunities ro 
meal local hams during a vacation In a lor- 
eign country. Many ol you Americans 
have been fortunate enough to be able to 
use ham radio far away from home while 
in the service Ovar&eas. However, only 
some twenty years i^o 0* less, a citizen^ 
Ship mthe licensing country was redu^^ed 
Uudktty. this has changed rn recent years. 
Many countries now have formal recipro- 
cal agreements tor temporary licenses for 
foreign visitors, 

A DftEAM COMES TRUE 

You are planning your trip to some for- 
eign country and you would like to operate 
ham radio while slaying there. Start your 



OZ5EDR 







planning well in advance. H you have no 
information on licensing in it^ country 
concerned, write to tt^eir telecom mun lea- 
tions authonty or ttm amateur radio or- 
ganization in that country for information. 
Addresses can be fouotd in ham maga- 
zines and in Ihe Caitb&ok. The easiest 
way^ though, is to write to your own na- 
tional amateur radio organization for 
reciprocal licensing information. 

Generally speai^lng^ the following 
things are common in most European 
countries^ 

• A reciprocal licensing agreemenl be- 
tween the two count nes 

• Application Ttduired 

• Processing time, one lo three months 

• LJcensie issued for a penod of majtimum 
three months each calendar year 

• Operating prtvileges in accordance 
with the class of license in the country 
you visit which Is closest to your own 
license 

• You have to follow the regulations in 
the country you visit which can differ a lot 
from what you are used to back riome, es- 
pecially maximum power llmils and fre- 
quencies used 

There are some important difterences 
from country to country. The following is 
currently valiil for each of Ihe Scandina- 
vian f Nordic) countries. 

Oenmafk. An application with the fof- 
lowtng data should be sent to fladio- 
tekniske Tfenste^ Tilladelsessektipnen, 
Islands firygge B3 C. DK-2300 Kobenhavn 
S, Denmark: Name and address of appli- 
cant, dale of birth and town, clllienship^ 
catlsign and class of license, time penod 
for the stay in Denmark, address Jn Den- 
mark, any remarks, and date and sig^ 
nature. 

A photocopy of your license, certified 
by two persor^s. should t»e attached to 
your applicai*ofi. This pracedure is ac^ 
cepted for apphcai^ts from the USA, Cana- 
da. Brazil. Australia^ Portugal Swit- 
zerland, France. Spait^. Luitemt^oufg. Bel- 
gium, West Germany. Great Bmam. Hot- 
land, Iceland. Sweden. Norway, and Fin- 
land. Amateurs from other countries have 
to supply documents stating the require- 
menis for a ham license in their country In 
addition to the license document. 

The feen 20 Danish kroner (around 
£2-5Q^< shall be paid when arriving In Den< 
mark. A speciai money order form sent 
with the license should tie used. The same 
procedure applies for the Faroe islands, 
prefix OY. 

fmtsttd. The Finnish amateur radio Or- 
gatiization, SRAL, has a somewhat differ- 
ent status than what is common in other 
countfEes. It is mandatory to be a member 
of the SRAL when bemg a ham in Finland. 
Yourappiication sent to the SRAL will be 
handled taster than if sent directly to the 
licensing aulharity. The address is Suo- 
men Radioamatooriiiitio r.y,, Postllokerc 
30e. SF 00101 Helsinki TO, Finland, 

The app heat ion shall slate your com- 
piete naiHie and address, citizenship, fixed 
station address m Finland, lime period for 
the stay in Finland, any remar1<s. and date 
and signature. 

A photocopy of your license and per- 
sor^l identificaiiori (photocopy of pass- 
port or similar documenti is required. Fin- 
land requires reciprocal agreements. Non- 
Rnnish citizens are prohibited from work- 
ing mobile ham radio. 

The fee la 3Q Finnish Markka (around 
SS.50) and Ihe license is sent COO. 

NorwBy. Norway also requires a recip- 
rocai agreemenl, and application shall be 
mailed to Norwegian Telecommunica- 
tions Adminisiration. Radio Inspection 
Office, PQ EOK 6701 SI. Olavs Ptass, 
N-Oslo 1, Norway. 

Freterably, you should send for their ap^ 



76 73 Magazine • July. 1983 




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plus CW terminal unit. 

• 3 ShiHs. active ftHers. remote 
control, xtol AFSK. fSK. plus 
much mofe. 

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Introduclory offer $429.95 

Offer Expires 9-1-83 



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• Single shift RTTY termir^al unit. 

• Xtal AFSK. FSK. active-filters and 

more. 

Kit $1S9,9S 

wired S289.95 




TU-T70 

• Single shift RTTY terminal unit. 

• Low cost, AFSK, active-filters, 

$149.95 

(Kit only) 




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• Single shift RTTY demoduiator. 

• Low cost, active-filters, autostart. 

$47.95 
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plug. The UL2M will 
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U.H.F. radio to your 
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The UL2M requires your 
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*^5e« Ust of A4vertis0r$ on pag^ f 14 



73 Magazine • July, 1983 77 



same data to be tilled oul as for the oir\ef 
countri^^. If you intend lo opef^te motile, 
the regtstratiiSn number of your veNlcte 
shall be stated. If you Intend tq rent a car, 
you can state that. One important differ- 
ence Is that you ^ave to enc^o^ a Certifi- 
cate of Good Conduct tseued by yoat local 
police ^ythofity. 

If you 3fe 3 foreign citizen but a residsftt 
In Norway, you can apply for a license one 
year at a time. The prefix Ihen Is LAO Op- 
Brailons from the Norwegian temtoriea 
J wo, JXO, and 3Ye are under separate 
regulations, 

Th« fee is 50 Norwegian kroner ^around 
S6 00), and shall t>e included witJi ifie ap- 
plication. 

Sweden. Together with Denmark, Swe- 
den Is one of a Fes^^ countries thai does not 
require reciprocal agreements. We have 
agreements, however, due to the reason 
thAl otherwise we wo^ld not 5e able to 
oper&le m counlnes wh^re they require 
s^cn formal agreements Tfre application 
form includes fhe regular data and snail 
bo sent to The Swedish Telecommunica- 
llon^ Radio Department, Licensing Sec- 
tion. S-123 86 Far&ta, Sweden. The ap- 
plication can be written in Swedish, 
Danish, Norwegian, EngUsh, Frencn, or 
German. A copy ol your valid license and a 
Centfieate of Good Conduct (tmpunMy} 
issued by tne police authorities in your 



naifve country must be Included. In cer- 
lain countries, such a certificate cannot 
be Obtained A certificate issued by the 
appHcant's emeteur radio organisation 

must then be included. 

The fee is SO Swedish kroner ^around 
$13^50), and shall be sent after you have 
received your temporary |3«rtnit. They 
prelef not to revive payments in ad- 
vance. 

Any foreign nalionai with permanent 
residence In Sweden for a considerable 
lime (currently 3 years) can gel a perma- 
neni Swedish license. If holding a foreign 
license, (he ex^uivalent Swedish license 
will be issued without any further exams. 
However, one obstacle to getting the high- 
est ct^ss of license, class A. is the code 
proficiency requirements. Most countries 
have 12 wpm as their highest code speed. 
A coda eKam at 16 wpm will solve that 
problem. 

In both Finland and Sweden, you use 
your call folio wed by /OH or /SM and a 
numtjer stating the district where the 
radio transmitter is used temporarily. 

LG5L G and SJ9 WL These I wo ca 1 1 s igns 
belong to the same statJon located on the 
border of Norway and Swadsn^ not very far 
from Oslo, the capital city of Norway The 
place is cat led Morokylien, a name com- 
bined of the word '^un^^ in those two Ian- 
guagiBS. It IS not a separate DXCC country, 
Diff you can operate tttis amateur station 



without any recfpmcai agfeemenfs. The 
only requirement Is fhat you show your 
valid ham license when visiting the 
station. You can rent the house with the 
station If you would like to spend a few 
vacailon days there. Howi^ver. if you want 
to rent, you are advised lo make feserva- 
lions. 

COilPAmSON WITH THE US 

As a comparison, the reciprocal licens- 
ing for visiting hams in the tJS is very fa- 
vorable. There Is no fee, the license is is^ 
sued for up to one yeaf at a time and is re- 
new abis, and the processing time is Short 
fusually sent by return mailK although the 
application form states 60 days. However, 
If your country does, not have a Teciprocai 
license agreement with (he LfS and you 
want to operate from there, you can take 
the exams at an FCC (federal Communl- 
cations Commission) Office. US citizen- 
Ship ig not required., and you can go 
through all exams ai the same time if 
agreed upon by the locat I^CC office, You 
Start with (e.gt tb© 20- wpm code and then 
lake tfie oombirved Technician/General 
class 70-que3tion eKam, If you pa$s. you 
can cDntinue with the Advanced written 
exam and finish with the Extra. Then you 
just wait for the mail, 

CONt^LUSlON 

If you ptan to visit a fofelgn country, ap- 
ply for a Jicense and you get a chance to 



mtet *he people. That is much mors re- 
warding than all the loufist aliractions in 
the wortd. 




WEST GERMANY 

HgnsJ, Schafii OJBBT 

D GOOO frsnkfurr 50 
W0st Germfnf 

FROM AHSATmL 

The ESA (European Space Agency) 
fixed— as of this writing— the ^aunchl^g 
date for the Afll ANE f ligrft as June 3, 1 983. 
Expected for this flight was the carrying 
of the European communication satellite 
ECS 1 as well as the AM SAT Phase ItfB 
satellite. Further ARIANE starts are 
scheduled tor August and ^fovember, 
t983> as we^l as January, TB84. 

See box for contest results. 

ANTARCTIC EXPEDITION 

Presently on a vJslt to the Antarctic is 
toy Y44YK- He *s scheduled to be ORV as 
Y63ANTin the near future. Hisequipmenl: 
two transceivers with TSO-W input. Type 











RESULTS OF THE tSTH EUROPEAN 
DX CONTEST WAEDC 1982 Rl 1 V 












1 

[ 




Slngl« Operator 






48. SM5BR<1 


40 


101 




16 




2538 


Call 


QSO 


QTC 


MuttI 


Score 


49, EA30MP 


49 







45 




2205 


1- Y39XO 


29a 


561 


27? 


190696 


50 DL8CX 


44 







46 




2024 1 


2. IITXD 


253 


467 


195 


140400 


51 VK2BaS 


20 


41 




30 




1830 


3. DK8NG 


245 


323 


245 


140385 


52, DK3KJ 


30 


25 




28 




1430 


A. IT9ZWS 


2«5 


461 


174 


126324 


53. Y33UO 


37 


11 




28 




1344 


5. SM6ASD 


243 


441 


184 


125656 


54. Y08FR 


49 







27 




1296 


6.W3FV 


196 


324 


209 


fOBfiaO 


55 Y22UL 


22 


40 




IB 




1116 


7, ICaPOF 


229 


417 


1*V2 


96192 


56 Y33TA 


21 


39 




13 




780 


B.OHiy 


248 


418 


147 


97902 


57 0K4IS 


23 







12 




276 


B. DJ2YA 


160 


3Bfi 


172 


93912 


58 VK8BE 


13 







20 




260 


10. 424KB 


176 


150 


191 


n?2flR 


59, YJSTT 


13 







IB 




234 


II.ISJftA 


139 


280 


124 


51956 


60. JATKfA 


4 







B 




32 


12. KB2V0 


173 


109 


131 


35942 
















13. y03AC 


123 


265 


94 


36472 




Multt 


'Operator 










14. OE2SNi 


123 


174 


117 


34749 


I.IZIKDP 


36/ 


/42 




196 




217364 


15. DJ&OT/CT3 


106 


89 


1/1 


3a^45 


2 f20M| 


329 


576 




209 




189145 


16. V79XN 


143 


254 


78 


30966 


3. 0H2AA 


32/ 


519 




188 




159048 


17.-4N7NS 


111 


230 


re 


25916 


4. G3UUP 


272 


497 




188 




144572 


18. HC5EA 


137 


61 


122 


24156 


5. HG5A 


2b/ 


508 




178 




1361 70 


19. 0N7KK 


154 





154 


23716 


6. OHSTA 


274 


428 




160 




112320 


20. UV3FD 


tSB 


140 


77 


23716 


7\ EBIBM 


310 


10 




310 




99200 


21. EA3BLO 


107 


244 


65 


22815 


8. Y03KPA 


209 


308 




108 




55620 


2Z £A30L 


247 





82 


20254 


9. UK4LAM 


136 


169 




56 




17690 


23. YVIGU 


126 





138 


17388 


10.YO5KLK 


157 







79 




12403 


24. DL80P 


73 


168 


m 


16S29 


11. DKeow 


49 


86 




50 




6750 


25. EAIAEB 


154 


Q 


101 


15554 


12. OK3RJB 


79 


25 




S3 




6^2 


25. DJilfl 


79 


152 


54 


12474 


13. JA2YKA 


34 


20 




44 




2376 


27. DJ1XT 


78 


136 


58 


t1984 


14. JA6YDH 


05 


10 




02 




30 


28. EABZ2 


73 


84 


75 


11775 




CU/I 












29. KILPS 


73 


27 


94 


9400 




oWU 




















N«me 




QSO 


OTC 


NNlfil 


Sco^e 




30. KJ2N 


07 


as 


60 


9300 
















31, 0K2SiT 


74 


12/ 


46 


9248 


1. Stig Kahr 


102) 


302 


469 


180 


138780 




32-OFlLX 


ei 


113 


52 


9048 


2 Alexander 1, Yufchenlto 


tUBSl 


283 


440 


165 


119295 














3. Hans Waterstraal 


<Y2) 


207 


7?& 


189 


81837 




33. 0K2SPS 


S3 


147 


35 


6050 




T * 












34. K6WZ 

35. OFeAl 


m 

56 


54 
98 


41 


7410 
6724 


4. Wem^ tudwig 

5. Vaclav Ces^k 


iou 

tOK) 


209 
168 


236 
148 


174 
143 


77430 

*4902 




36. DJ2YE 


90 





70 


6300 


6, Frans van Oostenbrugge fPA) 

7. Jaromir Marisier (OK) 


111 
140 


86 

47 


79 
71 


15583 
13277 




3?, DF62Y 
38 F608Y 


52 
71 


123 



36 
82 


6125 
5822 


8. Jindrlch Bozek 


(OK) 


82 


76 


19 


3002 




^. Ya3VB 


76 


50 


46 


5/96 


9. V. 1. Yermotentto 


(U€2) 


35 


41 


24 


1824 




40. KP4BJD 


66 





77 


fm? 
















4t. EA5CVH 


73 





87 


4891 


Trophif mnners, Sing^ Operator— Y39XO (Eu 


rope). 


W3FV (North America). | 


42. SMeeuv 


51 


77 


34 


4352 


4Z4KB fAs^aj. DJ60TiCT3 


fAfrtcaU 


HCSEA (SoutlY 


America). 


and VK2BOS 1 


43.WB4UBO 


34 


53 


46 


40O2 


(Oceania); Multi-operator- 


-LZtHDP lEurope). and JA2YKA <Asia): SWl 


.— Stig 


' 44. EA9JZ 


67 





57 


3819 


Kahi {Eli rope). 














45, W3A0H 


75 





50 


3TS0 


ChscklOQs; DE1KWD. DE4! lY, DL1VR. 0K3JKF, KBCV, PE1HQR. Y43WK, ] 


1 46. LU3DSU 


51 





73 


3723 


V55ZF. YU7AM, and SWL W6 John Mathews Contest 


manager: 


DF7Fa. 


tnx to 


4?. EA?BBK 


74 





42 


3108 


DE8BUS. 















78 73 Magazine • Jufy, 1983 



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DEALHRS WORl.DWIDH 



I 






!• 



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mix 953050 ^ 106 



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GARY Ami>ORT BOX 3$SE Rte 2 
SAN MARCOS. TX 786«6 



73 Magazine • July, 1983 79 



^ 



"Teftow 215." For aniennas—tii poles and 
t^xed quads 

The ctub stall dh of the W&si G&rman 
Soulh Poleeitpedinon ^OPSAAj is presenMy 
not QRV owing lo illness of tne opsfator, 
0F3LK, 




GREECE 

Art&stasios O. Panos SVJtG 
4 Voltatf ott St.. W. Kosmos 
Atfj&ns 411 
Greece 

The Min-istry at Communicalidns^ 
whfcti is rtsponsitle for lEsuirxQ Jicen$8S 
for Tiew amateurs, announced that 43ttcity 
by i sis passed the teits in March. Exams 
are held iwice a year \n Athens, during 
March and September, Negotiations be- 
tween rad Iq amateur officials of ttie Radio 
Amateur ASsoc^atrOh of Greece (RAAGJ 
and Itie Ministry of OominunicaiiDns are 
t>eing made so Ehat at least once a year en* 
ams are held in northern Greece fThessa- 
lofiikit Newcomeis to the hobby are 
fseued a C class ticket which aiiows Ihem 
to operate with 5Q Watts on the HF and 5 
Watts on the VNF bands, and this is the 
only limitation Tney are free to opefAt« 
any frequency in all bands and in any 
rnode^ 

Eleclmn^ for RAAG^s new board of di> 
rectors were hefed in February with abour 
1000 members, but oniy the 360 iJcansed 
members have the right to vote The new 
board oi directors is as follows: Evan- 
gelos Mousiak^s SV1AN. president: 
Kostas Fimerelis SV1DH, vice president, 
Kostas ThanopoyEos SVlDC. secretary; 
Manohs Oarkadakts SV1fW, treasurer; 
Dimitrios Konstantinou SVlGL. member; 
and Djmitnos Alexandras SV1 LL, memtwir. 

Ejections are held once every two years 
and candidates tor me board Of directors 
must be licensed members tor at least S 
years. Members with the nghi to vote 
must be licensed and have at teasi ane 
year in the association. 

After a lonp wailing time, the new fe- 
peater R3 (145075 in. t45,67S out) was 
ptftced at Heraktton. Crete Isiar^d, There 
are s{>me problerns with ttiH& antenna syi- 
tern, but tttese wiil: b«BOtved soon. Similar 
probiems, pFus mierference in ine input of 
the R^ repeater in Alhens forced it out of 
operation, and ^1 is in the line hands ol 
Dimitnoa SVlGt„ Besides the nece$sar> 
adjustment:^ and the ptac«mien1 at a 
dupiexeir^ tve is Ihmklng of changing the 
(fequencies trom R2 to R7 

Kostas SV10E, is quite an active radio 
amateur, one ol the lew hams ^ho are 
working RS satellites, and the only one in 
Greece who makes moonbouncd OSOs 
His local K»n is ctose to Hymetus Moun* 
tain, about 6 kilometers from the center of 
Alhens His shack is composed of Ken« 
wood and Yaesu VHP rigs and he uses a 
Kenwood transceiver for HF, His anten- 
nas are a set of four !F9FT) yagis and sev- 
eral dijpioles for HF. He is active on the 
129&MH2 nets, using the yagi and a para^ 
bolio antenna at his own construction. 
Kostas Iransmtis the AS mode and his 3-D 
pictures were really impressive. He is anx- 
ious to Vtfork the Phase III satellite. 

A visit to the Voice of America inslaiia- 
tlon was made by the j'adio amateurs Ot 
Greece Ai this visit, a Etemonstraiion of 
high-power transmitters and antennas 
was given at the transmitter site of Xanthh, 
Greece Most of northern Greece's radio 
amateurs attended, and Bad SVCiBK, 
deputy director of the s:tation, was pres^ 



V 




Konsiantinos Giouisemrt SVWB 



ent at the dinner, He showed thtm (tie big 
cofnpfex of antennas used and the trarts- 
mi tiers and the voFtage generators tnat 
keep VOA independent from power lines 
Attention: Here is required reading for 
any radio amiateurs commg into Greece 
and bringing trveir gear, it is against ttie 
law 10 bring a radio mid the country if a 
permit has not been issued by the Ministry 
of Communicatrons- If caught, you may be 
charged with illegal possession and/or 
use of radio, with up to two years impris- 
onment and^or up to a $2,500 line as 
punishment 




JTALY 

Mario Ambrost i2MQP 

Vi& SU&deifs. 13 
2Q129 Wlano, ifsfy 

Or* April 20, 1983. San Marino amateurs 
cJian^ed I heir prefiK. Tf>e rieiM or>e ts TT7 
You will also fiave tf^ possibitfty to wor)( 
them with a T71 prelix that wifl be released 
only {during contests and througn the cEub 
station. T70A 

The yaesu FT-9&0 has been rei eased far 
the Italian market; the pr>ce should t>e 
abound £2400. It you are interested m buy 
mg something here, some of the rixjst com- 
rrton prices in Itie maxttet aie: TS-*EM— 
S22€0, TH7DXX-*550, 3-500Z-S145, 
KLiVl 34XA-$750. and Cattbooks^Sm. 
Luckily for us, our salaries are generally 



lower tr^n th« Anwrican ones, OiherwCse 
we o^uld end up buying too many ngst 

In Italy, the new WARC bands nave no! 
yet been released, though we do hope to 
get them shoriiy. Some of us have been au- 
thonied to use 160 meters during contests 
in 19&2/S3, t>ui now this frequency is again 
completely off limits. We cto rtoi have even 
50 and 220 MHz, and as 3 resti^L the 2-meter 
t^and IS incredibly crowed (only two MH2 
are used, from 144 to 14fi). 

Repeaters are working In the 145.500^ 
145.800 segmeni, with a 600 kHz split The 
432-MH^ trequoncy is starting to become 
quite common, and repeaters are starting 
to be installeid in tfie main cities. 

Wo have two i^lasses of licenses, a VHP 
one that does not require any cotJe profi- 
ciency test and allows you to use H4 WiHz 
and up with a maximum Input power of 10 
W. and an HF class with a code proficiency 
test of & wpm which pefmiis use of all fre- 
qyef>Cies wuh a maximum input power of 
300 W- As a resul t O' the easiness to obtain 
Ihe ftrsl ricense. there is a lot of activity in 
the VHF sector, To give you an idee, here 
are some of the distance records ol the 
local VHFers on 144 MHz 14 EAT. 77Sfl km, 
usmg F2 propagation. IdAKP, 3628 km, us- 
irtg sporadic E^ and MEAT. 2500 km, using 
meteor scatter 

f4EAT has a personal record of 57 coun- 
tries workedi and 22 other hams have ob- 
tained more than 20 countries. 

A recent announcemeni has tjeen made 
atKHji the discovery ol a hew elementary 
pafiicie. it is caHed the W particle. The dis- 
covery has been made in Geneva by a team 
of 134 European and Amencan scientists 
headed tsy an Italian. iVlany other Italians 
participated in this W particle project; a ma- 



jor posilion (s held by O»0fgioGogg» I2KMG 
from Pav(a, a city close (o Milano. I2KMG 
has just been credited with his country 
342/318, thanks to the BYi PK card that was 
his last missing one, and thai places him In 
the first position on the DXCC Honor Roll, 

It's amazing to discover that I2KMG has 
been able lo pftrtorm such an ^mprsssive 
achievement on the air and m the la* coo*- 
siderin^ also that his ORL fs more than 200 
miles from his QTH and that he can devote 
time to DX only during the weekends. 

Of the new particles, it has been said 
that it IS not yet lOO^/« proven rt>ey really 
are Ws^ but that they "walk like Ws and 
talk like Ws": let's hope they wrfl nol mai^e 
loo much ORM dunng pileups! 

A new award was introduced in March 
by the Italian Amateur Association (ARI), 
the Italian tsiands Award. To ot»tain the 
awa^d. you must reach 10 points contact- 
ing different islands tor ihe same one on 
ditferem bands). Full tSeiails on this award 
and others will bemadeavaiiebfetoyouin 
the future In lhi:s column. It you have a par- 
ticular interest in Italian awards, write to; 
Award Manager, ABi, Via Scarlaiir 31. 
aQl24 MDsno. Italy. 

During trie first (fuarter of til8i3. most of 
the interest ot active hams m this country 
was devoted to the various troniests— 
In particular, the 73 40- and BO-meter con- 
test, the ARRL DX contest, and the WPX. 
Big guns participate in them, lighting for 
tr^ first positions, and small fishes take 
advantage of the sttuatron lo hum tor new 
states or tor new prehxes. 

This year, propagation has not been too 
good on the higher bands, tiut good open- 
ings have been found on 40 and 80; W6s 
and W7s have been worfce<i easily without 
too much power or big antennas. Good 
scores nave been claimed and some r&c^ 
ortts surely will be broken. 

Dther records are; on 432 MHz. lOMKt 
with 1520 km; on 1296 MH2. lOSVS wUh 
1520 km; on 2304 MHz. HPE wuh 267 km; 
on 5670 MHz. II RIP w*lh tE3 km; on 10 
GHz. lilSNY with 1 tm km, and or* 24 GHz, 
I3SOY wuh 73 km. 



CTICA 





ANTARCTIC 

SP|90 

TMf WOBLD 1 LAST rRQHTICn 



ANTARCTICA 

H^f ry A Miiis W4FD 
dpx 409 Buft^rd Roum 

Dry Branch GA 31020 

Geiie Btamt^tn^ W4A TE 
600 Hummmgtim Dr. SE 
Huntsvitte AL 35S03 

Brian Combs KA3JXR/KC4 contacled 
us in mid-October, I9a2, seeking a high- 
performance, low angle antenna suitable 
lor torvg^haul amateur communications at 
the South Pole Happiiy. the Control ie<t- 
Curreni Disthbution antenna, (see flefs- 
1»2.3). which has been in continual devei- 
opment by W4FD since 1959, amply fllla 
ihese requirements. 

Excitement ran rampant among the 
three oJ us, because Brian would have an 
outsianding antenna, and our CCD would 
be in the spotlight tor the worltl to see 
what it can do 

Sirtce Brian's scheduTed departure time 
was October 25h W4PD I mmed lately be- 
gan the assembly of three CCD di poles, 
for 7. 14. and 2t MN2: Each was of very 
rugged construclionH necessary to endure 
Ihe loaii of the incessar^t west winfl. mas- 
srve snowstorms, and temperatures 
which plunge to 100* F betow zero. 

Siple Station is located at Ihe base of 



80 73Magazme • Juiy, 1983 



the Antarctic Peninsufa at 75' 55' 3.83* W 
on ice and over 4000 feel above Sea level. 
Since the ice is satt-free, it provides a realty 
tall antemiria-suppOfting in so la (Of. 

Mmt. the Ndt»Ofi^ Science Foundation 
will continue to investjg^e ttie response 
of Ihe Eartti's magnetosptiere lo l^e injec- 
tion or cotiefent uJtra^ow-freiiuency (ULF) 
wave» in itie 2-3'ltitoliertz ranqe Tfiifi re- 
sponShfi includes wave growtti, spectral 
broadening, development of sidebands, 
triggenng of ULF emissions, wave cou- 
pling, and particle scattering. TheeKisting 
doublet for injecting the ULF waves lies 
on top ol the accumijlated snow and is 13 
miles (21.4 kllometersj long. During the 
present Ausiral summer, the enormous 
anienna wilt b^ raised above the surface 
and tts length doubJed. 

During 19fl3, trartsmJssions will be 
made to such satellites as the Dynamics 
Exproifer-t. ttie iS}S-1, and the 15^5-2 and 
to support the SEEP fStimu la ted Emission 
of Energetic Particles! expert mient. This is 
an extremely brief glimpse of the Antarc- 
tic invesfigatbons under ttve direction of 
scientists at Stanford University, the Uni- 
veraity ot Minnesota^ the Uni verity ol 
New Hampshke. Bell Telephone Labora- 
tories, and Utah Slate Umversiiy, tn 
cooperation with the British Antarctic 
Survey. 

Brian KA3JXWKG4 is age 32, matried, 
and the $on of a minister. H& has a greai 
interest In QRP operating, the outdoors^ 
aod boating. On October 26, he departed 
California for Ne^ Zealand, lor fitting of 
winter clolhing. He then went Id McMurdo 
Base to await weather suitable for a sate 
tar>ding at Si pie Station. 

Until about the end of January, mall ser- 
vice IS through FPO. San Francisco, New 
Zealand, and McMurdo Base From tnere 
ti is disuibuted lo Sipie and South Pole 
Stations by C- 130 aircra^. 

Brian wntes (Nov. 30): "We have now 
gone over a weeft without mail or any 
planes. However, life here ^s not hard. We 
are warm and comfortable, wiffi plenty of 
food, which IS all that anyone could ast^. 
During the Ausifal summer months, we 
may have as many as 40 people at the sta- 
tion, doing various construction projects, 
the major one bemg lo extend the ULF 
dipole 10 26 miles. By the end of January, 
onfy eigm ot us who are staying for the 
winter will be left^ to keep the station run- 
ning on our own without outside help. 




Tf^e P'B&nd ^fltettna at Siipfe Stafiort. Antarctica, ts usetf w r^c^iv^ dtata from Nike- 
Tomahawk rockets iaunched mto the magneiosphere iUS Navy fihotograptii 



"I em looking torward to using the three 
CCDantennas. t expect to t>e on the bands 
regularly; a J so, oiner members of tfaa sia* 
tfon will be using the equipment, so the 
overall uae should be quite high, because 
there will be no mall until Novembef, 1983. 
The CCD antennas also sound just righi 
tor my QRP operations on CW around 
21.170 MHz, beginning around the end of 
December 

"We have plenty ot coax and ^fttings of 
all &iz&& that we wiU likely need. 



HAM HELP 



I would llNe to get in touch with any ham& 
knowledgeable in using the TImex/Sinclair 
1000 computer for Morse, f^TTY, and other 
applications, 

Martin E McCoy WB0TCZ/7 

136S N. 9th 

Laramie Wr Q2070 

If anyone can supply me with the man- 
ual and schematic for a Lafayette HE-S9 
vfo, I will pay for the copying and postage. 

Greig DiOker£on M4DBS 

12453 Norlhwood Rd. 

Savannah G A 31406 

t am compiling a list of access codes 
for repeaters, and I need input Irom TTs 
readers. Access codes for open auto- 
patches will t>e listed with perm iss Ion; ac- 
cess codes for closed (member-only^ auto^ 
patches will not, but information about 



how to Join will be included. Also, please 
indicate repeater power, antenna height; 
coverage, and aulopalch exchange. Lists 
will be sent to all who contribute, and 
others may receive It for an SASE and 
copying costs, i woutd also like to hear 
from others in the EMS and forensic medi- 
cine fields (I am a CEMT and Deputy 
Coronei). 

Jeff Howell WB9PFZ 
PO Oon 1»7 

MUton KV 40045 

I need someor»e to design ernf build a 
frequency converter to convert freqi^n- 
cies m the male voice rar>ge to the (emate 
voice range t need to be my own 
secretary . 

H. J. Manmfan NSEXI 

PO Sox ai2 

Shawnee OK 74S01 



"During the p resent heavy work sched- 
ule, several plans for amateur construe- 
tjon are being considered The problem is 
that the conduit carrying the coaxial 
transmFssion lines to the tower is under 40 
feet of snow. The major idea at present is 
touliifze the aurora hut for a shack, where 
we woutd install a Colllne KWM-2 and the 
HW^8. This pian gives a reasonable over' 
ground run to the tower. A patch board 
would be constructed. lo mix and match 
equipment. 

"Due to commercial schedules, we are 
not able to meet the Sunday and Wednes- 
day schedules originally planned for 
amateur operating We do come up a cou- 
ple of limes per week, after 2OD0 hours our 
time, on the Mari i i me Mobi te ne t on t43 1 3 
MH; SSB {catch us there for any traffic). 
All our lirtears are one kilowatt. I had not 
heard thai 10 MHz had opened up. We will 
fry to find a cry^ial lor thai t>and. 

"We did not expect the 7MHz CCD an- 
tenna which you provided; it shoutd make 
life very Jntereating, indeed. Forty meters 
doesn't really open up for us until sunset 
begins. This 2A hoors of daylight is quite 
hard on communications, Twenty meters 
IS our best band by far It Is the only one 
that we can count on Several hams have 
asked me on the air aboui the CCD anten- 
jia; they aJi want to learn more about it. H 
should be an inieresimg yearil 

i have had my first experience with a 
piieup? For a newly-ltcensed ham wtw is 
stiJI trying to master the basics (like mov- 
iivg from a net amJ tiiMling the other sta- 
tion), a piteup is quilo something. When it 
happened, t had lo shut down before giv- 
ing every station a OSO. Patience seems 
to be the key to keeping everythmg rea- 
sonably under control (perhaps some Vai- 
lum woutdn't be a bad idea, either}. 



Perhaps I could work more stations if I 
or^^y gave RST reporls. But I don't think 
that is fair, so I spend some t^me with 
every QSO. 

^1 ex[»ct to use off-duty lime for study- 
ing to fill the gaps m my knowledge, so 
that J can take the commercial examina- 
tion tor radio telegraphy and maritime en- 
dorsements and the exam lor the amateur 
Extra 

"The weather so faf has tjeen remark- 
ably good. We have gone 9 days with clear 
sunny skies. Sut very soon we wi!) be get- 
ting 5'6-day snows and winds. That is the 
"whiteout" that you have heard of, when 
you often can't see more than a few feet in 
front of youn stilt, there is wori^ out there to 
be done The Antarctic is easily one of the 
most beautifui places thai I have been. 
The work is hard and often long, but we 
are getting a tot done " 

The zero humidity in Antarctica resurts 
in Violent lightning and atmospheric dis- 
tutts^nces, as well as aurora) eff^ts, 
which subiect antennas to many>thou- 
sand-vovi stresses. Fo^ this reason, drain 
resistors were installed acf oss the capac^ 
iiofs in the largest r7'MHz) CCD dipoie 
The heavy wind toading is a maiot siruc- 
turai consideration which was met by 
assembling each antenna on a length of 
600- pound-test monofilament fishing fine 
as a supporting messenger. Two 300- 
pound test monotiiament iines^ were then 
spiralled around the entire length of the 
antenna, In opposite direct ions» with fre- 
quent lies. Survival of the antennas now 
depends upon the monofitamint lines re- 
mainmg ftexibfe and not crystsli^^ng in 
the extreme sub-zero tempera lures. Ends 
ol the 500-ipound-test messenger lines ex- 
tend tteyond the antenna ends to serve as 
msulators aruf also to provide a means for 
anchoring. 

tdealiy, the CCD dipole (S fed by 300- or 
4S0-0hm transmission fine through a 1:4 
balun located ^^irectiy at the transmitter 
output. This provides the best cur rent bal- 
ance and bandwidth, and band-changtng 
Is then only a matter of luttiing the 
transmitter bandswtich. f^lo matching net- 
woFk or tuner is needed. However, at S^ 
pie, ihe violent winds dictated ihe use of 
coaxial line, whrch has a better chance for 
survival than even the heavy commercial- 
fiJ^e twiniead-tine types. Also, the antenna 
lower bein^ over tOO feet away, a oon- 
siderabte run of line is exposed lo poss^ 
bte damage by nature's atemenis. 

Tfie call KC3AAD will be us€<f by 
arvother staff member at Si pie Si alien. 
Phone patches to families and trie rKis will 
be made on 14 and 21 MHz and nave first 
priority. Brian asks only that callefs watt 
unlit these are cfeLared, then general con- 
tacis on SSB and CW are welcomedi. The 
most reliable band m the Antarci»c has 
been 14 MHz, so more activity rs expected 
tli^re. All contacts will be confirmed by 
Brian's QSL upon his arrival home follow- 
ing the IS-month tour 

A CCD antenna net was recently formed 
by a group oi enthusiastic ufiem in the 
Oklahoma area. Anyone interested in a 
better antenna is i^nvited to join N6ATS 
and the group on 7,203 MH7 ^3.843 MHz. al- 
tefnaie) ai 0100 UTC daily. 

For construction data for the improved 
CCD; send an SASE to either of the 
authors. 



RefarerKes 

1. Harry A Milts W4FD and Gene Bnzen- 
pine W4ATE, '"Antenna Design, some- 
thmg New;" 73, October, 197B, page 282. 
2^ Harry A Mitts W4Ft> and Gene Brize^- 
dine W4ATE. "The CCD Antenna— An- 
other Look;' 73. July. 1981. page 50 
3. Harry Longerich W4ANL The CCD An- 
tenna Revisited," 73, May, 1992, page 40. 



73 Magazine * July J 983 81 



Nex'tile C Harfeck 
ManitCf fmtrumenis 

Svffno\. 20! 8 
NSW Australia 



Colin Dawson 

TO Bm ihS 

Chippendale. 2008 
N^W Australia 



Down-Under Depth Sounder 

Get your feet wet with this Australian construction project 
We promise that you won't get in over your head. 



Reprinted vwitti permission from the November, 1982. issue of Electronics AiiBtraila, PO Box 163, Chippendate, 2008, NSW Australia. 



Depth souodpr^ on plea- 
sure craft are primanly 
ysed for srmply measuring 
waler depth, although some 
more elaborate (and expen- 
sive) models can locate fish 



or even produce a scan of 
the sea bottom so I hat reefs 
and other i*ynken ob|ects 
can be located. The unit de- 
scribed here ia\\% into the 
formi^r category and, as 



such, is designed to be easy 

to construct and to operate 

After all. vvhal could be 

easier than reading a few 

numbers off a digital 
display' 




Photo A, Ihe digital depth sounder. 



The circuit was devel- 
oped by Sydney engineer 
Neville Harleck whose com* 
panv* Monitor Instruments, 

can supply complete kits for 
the prnjpct. We at fiec- 
Iranics Au'itraUn simply 
assenil>lpd the unit depicted 
here and prepared the con- 
structional details 

Once assembled, ihe kit 
certainly looks the part Two 

printed circuit boards — a 
display board and a main 
board — accommodate vir- 
tually all the elecLronics. 
and these are housed in a 
white mofded plastic case- 
Overall case dimensions are 
a compact 125 mm W x 
140 mm D X 58 mm H 

While the case is not 
watertight, it is reasonably 
weatherproof and should 
stand up well to the rigors of 
the marine environment Its 
compact size also means 
that you should have no dif- 
ficulty in finding a suitable 
mounting position for the 
device regardless of the 
tvp€* of boat you own. 



82 73 Magazine • July, 1983 



6eOA t?1 



^Mitmty&^o 



WM 



I an 



*I2V 




an 

SPtflHEfl 



•SEE TEMT 



BELOW 



Circuit diagram for the digital depth sour^der. 



Other features include a 

bright 3<iigil LED display, a 
sensitivity control, an alarm- 
depth-set control, and a 
feeWmeters switch mounted 
on the rear panel A 
U-shaped mounting bracket 
allows the case to be tilted 
to provide a convenrent 
viewing angle- 

The audible alarm func- 
tion is a particularly useful 
teature. When selected, it 
sounds whenever the water 
depth decreases below a 
preset level, thus eliminat- 
ing the need for continuous 
visual monitoring. The 
danger of running aground 
is never greater than when 
the fish are biting, or you are 
otherwise preoccupied! 

Basic Principle 

The principle on which a 

depth sounder operates is 
quite Straightforward, An ul- 
trasonic sound pulse is di- 
rected into the water and 
the time taken for the signal 
to be reflected from the bot- 
tom is measured, Since the 
speed of sound in water rs 
reasonably constant, the dis- 
tance the sound pulse has 
traveled, and hence the 



water depth, can be easily 
calculated. Fig. 1 shows the 
essential elements of a 
depth-sounder system. 

First, the transmitter gen- 
erates a short pulse of 
200-kH/ energy and, at the 
same time, starts the clock. 
The receiver subsequently 
detects the reflected signal 
and produces a pulse that 
stops the clock, If the clock 
IS counting at the correct 
rate, then the display will in- 
dicate the water depth 
directly in the appropriate 
units (meters or feet). 

Most of the important 
functions of the transmitter 
and receiver circuits are 
incorporated into a single IC 



TUN IMG 



TRi^NSOUCER 



t>- 



TRAfJSMItTEH/ 

HECE^VEfl 



PULSE 



made by National Semicon- 
ductor This IC, designated 
the LM1812, has been 
around for some years now 
and greatly simplifies the 
design task for a practical 
depth sounder Fig. 2 shows 
the block diagram of the 
complete unit and should 
be studied in conjunction 
with the circuit diagram in 
order to understand how the 
instrument operates. 



Circuit Description 

Our circuit description 
starts with ICIa, which func- 
tions as the timebase clock. 
This generates a 1-ms pulse 
approximately every 800 
ms. This pulse activates the 
transmitter and resets the 
display and alarm functions. 

ICla, part of an MC3401 
quad op amp, is wired as an 

astable multivibrator which 



ULtffASOMC 
THAKS&yCEliE 







RECEIVER 
AMP^iriER 






DEtfCTOR 




CLOCK AhtD 






















1 


















I^OWEfl 
OSCH.LATI>« 






PULSE 
GCNERATOR 















fig. 1. Basic scheme for an ultfasonic depth-aounder circuii. 



QKIL.1-AT0I4 



FUP-FUOP 



OlSfH-AYS 



COuNTEfl^ 
LATCH 



DECODER 

pnJVER 



IJ 

LI 



n 

LI 



u 



] 



AL^RII 



MOfNOStABLf 
U^ULTlVlBRATOn 



AifD GAT£ 



ALARM 
OSCILLATOR 



-^ 



ALARM SET 



Fig. 2. Block diagram of the complete depth-sounder circuit The transmitter/receiver is 
based on a single IC. 

73 Magazine • July, 1983 83 






Photo B. Virtually bII the circuitry is accommodated on two PC boards. 



functions as follows: At 
switch-on, both the non-in- 
verting input (prn 2] and the 
output (pin 4) are high. The 
1-J4F timing capacitor now 
charges via diode D4 and its 
series 3.3k-Q resistor When 
the voltage across the capac- 
itor (and hence on pin 3 of 
IC1 a) reaches a critical level, 
the output of ICIa goes low. 
Since diode D4 is now re- 
verse biased, the timing ca- 
pacitor discharges via the 



1.2*tTiegohm resistor into pin 
3 of ICIa. When the voltage 
on pin 3 goes low enough, 
pin 4 switches high again 
and the whole cycle is re- 
peated. The 10-megohm re- 
sistor between pins 2 and 4 
provides positive feedback 
to speed up the switching 
transitions. 

The output of ICIa thus 
consists of a train of short 
positive-going pulses. These 
pulses are coupled to ultra- 



sonic transceiver IC3, count- 
er IC4, and to the non-invert- 
ing input of IC2a which con- 
trols the alarm function, 

1C3 is the LM1812 trans- 
ceiver chip referred to earli- 
er. Both the transmitter and 
receiver sections share a 
common tuned circuit, corh 
sisting of LI and the ,001 -jiF 
capacitor v^hich makes for 
easy tuning. Readers are re- 
ferred to the Natior}al Semi- 
conductor Linear Databook 




fig. 3. PC board for the depth sounder- 

73 Magazine • July, 1983 



for a detailed description of 
this IC, as only a general de- 
scription of its operation 
will be given here, 

The timebase pulse from 
ICIa is applied to pin 8 of 
IC3 via a lOk-Q resistor This 
causes the transmitter to 
"fire"at a frequency deter- 
mined by the tuned circuit, 
the output signal appearing 
at pin 6. This is coupled to 
the transducer via L2, a 
parallel 3300i>F capacitor, 
and a .01 -^F blocking capac- 
itor. The signal appearing 
across the transducer thus 
consists of a Inns burst of 
2004 Hz energy of about 
150-200 V peak tOi^eak At 
the end of the 1-ms clock 
pulse, IC3 reverts to the 
receive mode. 

Signals picked up by the 
transducer are coupled into 
the first receiver stage at pin 
4 via a 100-pF capacitor Fol- 
lowing amplification, the 
signal appears at pin 3 and is 
coupled into the next ampli- 
fier stage via VRl, the sensi- 
tivity control. It is this stage 
that is tuned by the LC net- 
work on pin 1. 

As far as the user is con- 
cerned, the signal is not seen 
again until it appears at pin 
14, and by this time it has 
been amplified, detected, 
shaped, clamped, and 
clipped so that we get a nice 
clean negative-going pulse 
from the supply voltage to 
grou nd 

The functions of a few 
other pins on IC3 should 
also be considered before 
moving on to the next sec- 
tion. It will be noticed that 
the timebase pulse is also 
fed into pin 18 via a 3.3k-Q 
resistor and series diode D2. 
This is done to inhibit the 
detector during the transmit 
time and thus prevent a 
false output signal appear- 
ing at pin 14. The 47k-Q re- 
sistor and 0.22*|iF capacitor 
connected to pin 17 provide 
a measure of impulse noise 
reiection. 

The 033-^ capacitor on 
pin 9 is charged during the 
transmit period and serves 
to inhibit the second stage 
of the receiver. As the 



voltage across the capacitor 
falls (at the end of the 
transmit period), the gain of 
the second stage increases. 
This has the effect of filter- 
ing out signals received dur- 
ing the first few milHseconds 
after the transniit pulse- 
Without this effect, echoes 
from the boat's keel or rud- 
der could falsely trigger the 
display circuitry and cause 
an incorrect reading. 

The output signal appear- 
ing at pin 14 is coupled to 
ICIc which functions simply 
as an inverter The inverted 
signal is then fed to ICId 
which is connected as a 
monostable and functions 
as follows. 

Pins 9 and 4 of tCI are 
normally low and, because 
of its 470k'Q feedback resis- 
tor, ICId will be latched 
either high or low. When a 
timebase pulse occurs, pins 
12 and 10 are forced high, 
and the feedback resistor 
latches the device in this 
state. When an echo is sub- 
sequently received, it pro- 
duces a positive pulse at pin 
y which is coupled to the in- 



verting input of ICId and 
hence forces pin 10 to go 

low. 

Thus, the time that pin 10 
stays high is the time from 
transmit puise to received 
echo Note that pin 10 stays 
low until the next transmit 
pulse, which means that any 
echoes occurring after the 
first have no further effect 
on ICId* Multiple echoes 
are thus ignored. 

The signal at pin 10 of 
ICId is differentiated and 
the negative-going pulse 
coupled via diode D5 to the 
latch-enabfe input (pin 10) of 
counter IC4 

1C4 isanMC14553 3<ligit 
BCD counter with multi- 
plexed outputs The counter 
is reset to zero by the 
timebase pulse on pin 13 
and the trailing edge of this 
pulse is used to enable the 
latches in the chip (thus 
displaying QUO); i.e., the 
timebase pulse is differen- 
tiated by a .0047-^ capaci- 
tor and a lOk-Q resistor and 
the resultant negative-going 
pulse coupled to the latch- 
enable input of tC4 via D3 



As soon as the reset pulse 
has finished, the counter 
starts counting clock pulses 
from IClb. When an echo is 
received, a negative-going 
pulse is coupled through to 
pin 10 via diode D5 as 
above, and the counter data 
is transferred to the latches 
for decoding and display. 
The next transmit pulse 
again resets the counter and 

displays to zero and the cv- 
cle is repeated. 

Note that if no echo is 
received, the displays will 
remain on zero This is be- 
cause a latch-enable pulse 
must occur before data can 
be transferred to the 
latches. 

IC5 is a BCD-to-7-segment 
decoder/driver chip which 
decodes the binary data 
from IC4 to drive common 
cathode 7-segment LED dis- 
plays. Since the displays are 
multiplexed, the corre- 
sponding anodes are wired 
jn parallel and connected to 
the outputs of IC5 via 
680-Ohm current-limiting re- 
sistors Each display cath- 



ode is connected to the 
emitter of a BC327 PNP tran- 
sistor (Q1, Q2, and Q3K and 
these transistors are turned 
on and off by signals from 
the multiplexer in IC4. 

If you like, you can regard 
the counter, decoder, and 
display circuitry as a "black 
box" controlled solely by 
the timebase pulse, the 
latch^nable pulses, and the 
clock pulses on pins 13, 10. 
and 12 of IC4 respectively. 

Clock pulses for IC4 are 
derived from ICIb which is 
connected as a multivibra- 
tor and runs continuouslv 
Its frequency is controlled 
by the OlB-pf capacitor in 
company with VR2, VR3, 
and the 27k'Q and 12k-Q 
feedback resistors. Switch 
SI shorts out VR3 and the 
27k-Q resistor, thus chang- 
ing the oscillator frequency 
so that the display can read 
(lirectly in either feet or 
meters. 

The clock frequencies for 
ICIb are derived as follows: 
The speed of sound in water 
is approximately 1S00 m/s 
and is fairly constant over 



^z-^* Qt 



Q3 Ql 



^V 



4/( 



"•^S. 



1 




tzD, 



Fig. 4. Parts placement for the depth sounder, 
than the other ICs. 



Take care with component polarity, and note that tC4 is oriented diiferently 



73 Magazine * July; 1983 65 



quite a wide range of tem- 
perature and salinity. It will 
therefore take 1 second to 
receive an echo in 750 
meters of water, since the 
sound pulse has to go down 
and up. Thus, if the clock is 
set to 750 pulses per second, 
the counter will count up to 
750 and the water depth will 
be displayed directly in 
meters. 

If we want the display to 
read in feet, then the oscilla- 
tor frequency can be found 
simply by multiplying 750 
by 3,28 (the conversion fac- 
tor from meters to feet), 
which gives 2460 Hz. Thus, 
the clock must run at 2460 
Hz for feet and 750 Hz for 
meters. A fathoms display 
could be achieved with a 
clock of 2460/6 = 410 Hz 

Finally, we come to the 
alarm function. The depth at 
which the alarm sounds is 
set using front-panel alarm- 
set control VR4. First, the 
af arm-set control is pulled 
out to display the alarm set- 
ting. The control is then 
rotated until the display 
reads the required alarm 
depth and then pushed in 
again. The display immedi- 
ately reverts to the water 
depth and, if this is less than 
the alarm setting, an audible 
warning is produced. 

All alarm functions are 
controlled by IC2, an 
MC3401 quad op amp. lC2a 
functions as a monostable 
multivibrator, the period of 
which is determined by VR4 
and the l^tf timing capaci- 
tor. The monostable is trig- 
gered by the timebase pulse 
which is coupled in via a 
100-pF capacitor and causes 
pin 9 to go high, thus re- 
verse biasing diode D7 

If an echo is received 
while the monostable out- 



WlftE 




r 



DISPLAY BOARD 
' SOLDER 



fiaon flEsisTORs 



USkXH BOARD 



Ffg. 5* Diagram showing 
how four of the 6dO-Ohm re- 
sist ors are mounted 

86 73 Magazine • July, 19S3 




Photo C. Close-up view of the completed PCB assembly. 
Note that the seven 680-Ohm resistors adjacent to the dis^ 
play board are mounted end on. 



put is high, then both D6 
and D7 will be reverse bi- 
ased for the duration of the 
echo pulse (i.e., for as long 
as pin 9 of ICIc remains 
high). This causes pin 3 of 
lC2b to go high and the pin 
4 output to go low. Since it 
is now forward biased, the 
anode of diode D9 also 
goes low, enabling oscilla- 
tor IC2c to start up. 

IC2c is a voltage-con- 
trotled oscillator whose fre- 
quency depends on the 
voltage at the anode of 09, 
i.e., the charge on the 1^ 
capacitor. Initially, the1-|4F 
capacitor Is discharged and 



the oscillator starts at a 
high frequency. When the 
echo pulse ends, D9 is re- 
verse biased again and ihe 
^-^£ capacitor charges to- 
wards the positive supply 
rail via a 1 -megohm resistor. 
As the voltage across this 
capacitor rises, the dis- 
charge current from the 
,001 iiF capacitor slows and 
the output frequency drops 
lower and lower until even- 
tually the oscillator stops. 

3 X MAN 3640 





TfTf 



f f f f f 

Fig. 6. PC board for the Fig, 7, Parts placement for 
display. the display PCB. 



NPN transistor Q4 simply 
functions as a buffer and 
drives a small loudspeaker 
in its emitter circuit via a 
22-Ohm resistor. The result 
is a siren-like note pulsed at 
the timebase frequency. 

The alarm can sound on- 
ly if an echo pulse is re- 
ceived while the output of 
monostable IC2a is high. 
Thus, it is the monostable 
pulse width that determines 
the alarm depth and this is 
displayed by using the trail- 
ing edge of the pulse to trig- 
ger the latch enable (pin 10) 
of counter 1C4. 

First, however, the echo 
pulse must be disabled, and 
this is done by setting the 
sensitivity control (VR1) to 
minimum. The output of 
monostable IC2a is differ- 
entiated by the .0047 -^ ca- 
pacitor and the negative- 
going pulse produced at the 
trailing edge coupled via 
switch S2 (on the back of 
VR4) and diode D8 to the 
latch enable of IC4. Since 
the timebase simultaneous- 
ly resets IC4 and enables 
IC2a, the display will now 
show the alarm depth in the 
appropriate units. 

Power for the circuit is 
derived from a 12-V battery 
(normally fitted to the 
boat). Diode D1 provides 
protection against reversed 
supply polarity, while 0.1 'fiF 
and 1000-^F capacitors pro- 
vide supply decoupling and 
filtering. Choke L3 is not 
supplied as part of the kit 
and is not fitted unless 
problems are encountered 
with ignition interference 
[see Construction). 

Construction 

Construction can begin 
with the assembly of the 
main PCB according to the 
overlay diagram. Insert the 
wire links first, followed by 
the resistors, capacitors, 
coils, diodes, and transis- 
tors. Take care to ensure 
that all polarized compo- 
nents are mounted the right 
way round. 

The ICs should be insert- 
ed last Note that 1C4 and 
ICS are CMOS devices and 



should be treated accord- 
ingly. When soldering these 
devices, ground the barrel 
of your soldering iron to the 
ground track on the PCB 
(use a small clip lead) and 
solder the supply pins (8 
and 16] last. 

The display PCB should 
be assembled next. Watch 
the orientation of the dis- 
plays and note that the links 
must go in first The display 
board is mounted on the 
main board using six tinned 
copper-wire links along the 
bottom edge. In addition, 
four of the 680<!)hm cur- 
rent-limiting resistors are 
mounted between the main 
PCB and the display PCB 
and, if these are bent as 
shown in Fig, 3, will provide 
additional support 

The front- pane I controls 
can now be mounted in po- 
sit ion and the red perspex 
window cemented in place 
using epoxy adhesive. This 
done, wire the controls to 
the main PCB and fit the 
DIN socket and feet/meters 
switch to the rear paneL 





m^§M 



Photo D. Front panel and display PCB details. Note that the 
spare switch pole on the alarm-set control can be used to 
automatical I Y disable the echo pulse [see text). 



Complete the wiring accord- 
ing to the main wiring dia- 
gram and Fig 3. 

Although not part of the 
original desiga the circuit 
can be easily modified so 
that the echo signal is auto- 
matically disabled when- 
ever S2 is closed. As sup- 
plied, there is a spare switch 
pole on the back of VR4, 



and this may be used to dis- 
able the echo signal by con- 
necting it between pin 2 of 
IC3 and ground. With this 
simple modification, you 
won't have to fiddle with the 
sensitivity control each time 
you wish to display the 
alarm depth. 

The loudspeaker is fitted to 
the top half of the case (over 



the slots) by glu ing it in place 
with contact adhesive A 
piece of cloth is provided to 
cover the slots. Connect up 
the speaker, fit the trans- 
ducer DIN plug with a couple 
of flying leads for the power 
connections, and you are 
ready for the smoke test! 

Apply power (12 V) and 
switch on. All being well, 
you should be greeted by a 
chirp from the speaker and 
the display should read 000 
or 001. Make sure that the 
atarm-set control is pushed in 
and fully anticlockwise [i,e,, 
alarm offX 

Now set the sensitivity 
control to minimum (to dis- 
able the echo pulse) and pull 
out the alarm-set controL 
Slowly rotate the alarm -set 
control clockwise and check 
that the display shows pro- 
gressively higher numbers, ff 
this check is OK, operate the 
f eet/metei3 switch and check 
that the display changes by a 
3:1 ratio. With the alarm-set 
control fully clockwise, the 
display should read a maxi- 
mum of approximately 30 



TRANSDUCER ASSEMBLY 



Begin the transducer assembly by gluing togettier the two 
plastic pieces forming the element tiousing. Ttiese are mold- 
ed in ABS, so use a suitable styrene adtieslve. Apply adhesive 
sparingly to the top edges of the "fried-egg^'-shaped ptece 
and then press the two parts together, ensuring that the 
mounting holes are correctly aligned. Aliow sufficient time for 
the adhesive to dry. 

The barium titanate element must be prepared next. Care- 
fully lln a small spot close to the edge of the element on each 
side and solder a short length of hcx)kup wrre to each spot. Be 
very careful with this operation, as too much heat will bum the 
silver off the surface of the element. Wrap the circumference 
of the element in plastic tape, using the tape to hold one of 
the wires against the edge. 



TRANtOUCEP 



TAJ*E 




■ I II I ! II III 



x: 



FOAM PLASTIC 

WII^E LEADS— ^, 




The surface where Ihe two wrres emerge is now the rear 
face of the transducer. Now lay the wire from the rear surface 
against the transducer and place the plastic foam disc in po- 
sition. Use more tape to secure it in place. The two wires 
should now emerge from one side as shown and should be 
reasonably well supported by the tape. Leave about 25 mm of 
wire free and strip and tin 3 mm at the end of each wire. 



Force one end of the coaitJal cable through the hole in the 
stem of the housing and strip and tin the ends of the braid and 
the center conductor. Carefully solder the coax to the wfres 
coming out of the transducer assembly and insulate the 
joints with more plastic tape. 

The transducer assembly must now t>e pushed into the 
housing, carefully pulling the coax down to avoid building up 
a loop of cable behind the transducer. 

Push the transducer down in the housing so that its front 
surface is about 3 mm below the lip of the housing cavity. 
Check the cable at the other end for shorts; if all is well, 
put your meter on a low ac voltage range and tap the trans- 
ducer with a screwdriver handle. You should see the meter 
give a kick, Indicating that the transducer is functioning cor- 
rectly. If not, check your connections carefully. 

Support the transducer assembly face up, where it can be 
left overnight, and you are ready for the epoxy resin encapsu- 
lation. Do not use g-minute epoxy. You must obtain some 
epoxy resin with a 6-12-hour setting time and carefully mix up 
enough to fill the transducer housing. After mming, allow it to 
stand for about 20 minutes to allow the air bubbles to escape, 
then pour It Into the transducer housing. 

Fill the housing right to the top so that the transducer ele- 
ment is completely Immersed and keep an eye on it for an 
hour or so, topping it as it runs down behind the element. Use 
a pin to prick any air bubbles that emerge. Take care here, as 
any air bubbles can drastically degrade transducer perfor- 
mance. 

On no account should you use polyester rdsln — you must 
use epoxy. Epiglass 40 resin is quite satisfactory. 

FInaliy, fit the DIN plug to the end of the cable, and fit the 
red and black supply leads. 



I i 



73Magazin0 * July, 1983 87 



meters (VR2 and VR3 rough- 
ly midrange). 

Now turn the alarm off and 
the display should go back to 
zero. Turn the sensitivity 
control fufly clockwise and 
lightly tap the face of the 
transducer with a screw^driv- 
er handle The display 
should flicker and momen- 
tarily read some random 
numbers. If the alarm is now 
set to maximum depth, it 
may be possible to trigger it 
by tapping the transducer 
face as above. (It will trigger 
only if you "hit"' upon an 
echo reading of less than the 
alarm setting.) 

Calibration 

If all the above tests 
work, your depth sounder is 
functioning and will give 
readings if taken out in a 
boat. However, it has to be 
tuned and calibrated if we 
are to obtain maximum sen- 
sitivity and if the readings 
are to be accurate, (f you 
have access to the appropri- 
ate test gear, this can be 
done easily on the bench; if 
you don't have test gear, the 
only way is to take the in- 
strument out on the water. 

Assuming that you don't 
have test gear, the proce- 
dure is as follows: 

• Tuning. Advance the sen- 
sitivity control until an echo 
is obtained, then back it off 
until the echo is just lost. 
Now tune L1 carefully until 
the echo reappears (display 
reading). Reduce the sen- 
sitivity again and continue 
the process until the op- 
timum setting is found for 
LI, L2 can be tuned in the 
same way, but as this has a 
low Q. its setting is not so 
critical. Most units will tune 
with the slug of L2 about 
flush with the top of the 
former. 

• Calibration. Once the 
tuning is done, the calibra- 
tion can be set if you have a 
chart. The problem is to find 
a known depth of water and 
set VR2 and VR3 to the 
known depth Do not forget 
to allow for the fact that the 
transducer may not be at the 
surface if it is mounted on 

86 73 Magazine • July, 1983 



the bottom of the boat; i,e,, 
the instrument reads depth 
beneath the transducer. 

It may even be possible 
to resort to the good old 
lead line to get an accurate 
depth measurement. 

First, set switch SI to the 
feet position and adjust 
trimpot VR2 until the dis* 
play shows the correct 
depth. This done, set SI to 
meters and adjust trimpot 
VR3, Note that VR2 must be 
set first as it affects the set- 
ting of VR3. 

If you have access to an 
oscilloscope, a signal gener- 
ator, and a frequency me- 
ter, the procedure is some- 
what different 

• Tuning. Connect the os- 
cilloscope probe to pin 1 of 
1C3 and couple in a lOOA^Hi 
signal to L2 via the .01 -^1 
capacitor. Now adjust LI 
and L2 for maximum signal 
strength 

If no signal generator is 
available, then it is possible 
to get a signal echo in air. 
Clamp the transducer to the 
underside of the work- 
bench and check that the 
unit is over a hard floor (car- 
pet will not reflect ultra- 
sound). Once an echo is be- 
ing received, simply tune LI 
and L2 for maximum signal 
strength. (Note: Because of 
the much tower velocity of 
sound in air than in water, 
the display will read about 
four and a half times the ac- 
tual distance) 

• Calibration. A frequency 
meter connected to pin 5 of 
ICIb will allow precise set- 
ting of VR2 and VR3 to 2460 
Hz and 750 Hz respectively. 
Alternately, you can use a 
CRO or a frequency meter 
to set the periods to 406 jis 
and 1.333 ms respectively. 

Once the unit is tuned 
and calibrated, it may be 
mounted in the case. To do 
this, lay the top half of the 
case (the half with the 
speaker in it) upside down 
on the bench and sit the cir- 
cuit board on the four 
mounting pillars. Fit the 
front and back panels into 
the slots provided and fit the 
large brass nuts into the cav- 



ities in the sides. Ensure that 
the board holes line up with 
the mounting pillar holes 
and fit the bottom half of 
the case. 

The two halves will fit to- 
gether closely and the four 
12 mm X no. 4 self-tapping 
screws may be fitted 
through the bottom holes 
and screwed into the mount- 



ing pillars. The U-shaped 
mounting bracket may now 
be attached with the large 
plastic knob-headed screws. 
Fit the front-panel control 
knobs, and your instrument 
is ready for use. 

Operation 

The transducer is the key 

to satisfactory operation of 



Parts List 

t printed circuit boanj. 111 x 100 mm 

t printed ctrcuH board. 41 x35 mm 

1 SPST toggle switch 

1 5-pin DiN socket and plug 

1 plastic case, 126x140x58 mm 

1 front panel to suit 

1 8*0 loudspeaker 

2 knobs 

1 U-shaped mounting bracket 

2 mountmg knobs for bracket 

1 ultrasonic transducer kit 

2 slug-tuned coils, LI ^ 12 

Semiconductors 

2 LM39O0, MC3401 quad op amps 
t LM1812 uttrasonlc transceiver 

t MC145S3 3-dlgft BCD counter 

1 MC14511 BCD-to-T'Segment decoder 

3 2N5819 PNP transistors 

I 2N5818 NPN transistor 

II 1N4001 silicon diodes 

3 MAN3640 7^segment LED displays 

Capacitors 

1 1000 HR16VW PC electrolytic 

1 220 hF/16WV PC electrolytic 

2 47 mF/ISVW PC electrolytic 

3 1 mR16\A/V tantalum 
1 0.33 mF mylar^ 

1 0.22 ^F mylar 

2 0.1 ^F mylar 

1 .018 fiP mylar 

1 .01 iiF/250 V disc ceramic 

3 .0047 pF mylar 

1 ,0033 ^F/250 V disc ceramic 

1 .0022 fif mylar 

4 >001 juF mylar 

2 ICX) pF disc ceramic 

Potentrometers 

1 100k linear potentiometer with DPST pullon switch 

1 10k mini-trimpot, horizontal mounting 

1 5k minl-trimpot, horizontal mounting 

1 5k linear potentiometer with SPST rotary switch 

RdsJstors (V4 W, S% unless specified) 



2 10 megohm 1 

2 2-2 megohm 1 

1 1.2 megohm 1 

6 1 megohm 2 

a eeok 5 

1 470k 2 

2 390k 7 

1 330k 1 

2 150k 3 
4 100k 

Miscellaneous 

Rainbow cable, tinned copper wire, sotder, siyrene adhesive, 
epoxy resin 



68k 

47k 

27k 

12k 

10k 

3.3k 

680 Ohms 

22 Ohms 

10 Ohms 



J 



any depth sounder, and a 
few tips on mounting may 
not go astray. Many people 
have mounted transducers 
inside the hull in a "water- 
box" and it is possible to get 
satisfactory results with this 
method. However, some 
sound attenuation will oc- 
cur and this will reduce the 
range of the instrument In 
the worst case, it may not 
work at all. 

The best mounting meth- 
od is on the outside of the 
hull, roughly in the middle 
third of the boat and as 
close to the center line as 
possible. It must be clear of 
any fittings and in an area of 
clear water flow. Turbu- 
lence and bubbles under the 
transducer will reduce its 
performance. In yachts, 
hull-heeling under sail will 
cause the transducer to fire 
its sound beam out at an an- 
gle and this will reduce sen- 
sitivity; if the boat heels far 
enough, the echo may be 
lost altogether. Mind you, 
when this happens, the crew 



is usually too busy to be 
looking at echo sounders! 

Installation of the unit 
should be straightforward, 
but keep the transducer and 
all leads as far away from 
the engine as possible to 
avoid ignition interference. 
If ignition interference does 
prove a problem (i.e,, the 
display reading fluctuates 
randomly), choke L3 will 
have to be fitted in place of 



the appropriate link on the 
PCB. This should be a power 
supply choke of around 10 
mH in value. 

Because this choke is not 
available from Monitor In- 
struments, it will have to be 
purchased separately, if 
required 

The maximum depth 
range attainable with this in- 
strument will vary consider- 
ably and depends on a num- 



KITS AND PARTS AVAILABLE 

The sole supplier of the PCB, a proprietary desfgn, is Moni- 
tor Instruments, PO Box 116, Rosebery, Sydney, 2018, NSW 
Australia. Any of ttie following ordered, when orders are re- 
ceived with payment, will be shipped within 5 days. Amounts 
are in US dollars. 

Fully assembled and tested Depth Sounder— $180.00^ 

Complete kit (add $12.00 for postage)— $138,00 

Transducer kit (add $7.00 for postage)— $40.00 

Motded piastpc case/mounting (add $5,00)— $25.00^ 

Set of circuit boards (add $5.00)— $20.00 

Set of GoiJs (add $5.00)— $12.50 

Set of semiconductors, complete {add $5,00)— $25.00^ 

^Postpaid, 

^Includes front and back panels, control knobs, and gimbal 

mounting bracket/knobs, 

^Does not include the displays. 



ber of factors including tun- 
ing accuracVp transducer 
mounting, water turbulence, 
and bottom reflectivity Bot- 
tom reflectivity will be high 
with a flat sandy bottom and 
may be nit with heavy weed 
growing over soft mud 

A typical unit should give 
a depth range of from 
80-120 meters without any 
difficulty and possibly 
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Is a steady bottom reading 
of 30 meters, say. with occa- 
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e.g., a fish at 20 meters or a 
salinity or cold water layer 
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-H-S^e Usi <ff A^v^fUSffs cwi page M4 



73 Magazine • July, 1983 89 



CCurursi VU2VIZ 
Bartgatoe Amateur Radio Club 
FO Bon 5Q53 

Bangalore 560 00}, India 



The ROM-less, RAM-less 

CQ Sender 

Automatic CW can be yours for the price of a few diodes. 
And you can reprogrann without spending a c//me 



Morse code can be gen- 
erated automatically 
by various methods using 
memory chips like RAMs, 
PROMs, and EPROM5. If 



RAMs (Random Access 
Memory) are used in the de- 
sign, the memory is tempo- 
rary. That means if the unit 
is switched off, all the mem- 



4 tQ a LtKE OCMUX 



variable: 

CLOCK 



? — ? — T 



DIQQE AAftikIr 



a c 



ADDRESS SCAN 



TTTT 

J .fill 

! I I I t I 

I I I I 



I 



IC TO I UHt WUX 



RfLflY 

DRIVER 



'TO 
,K£¥ 



Fig. 1, Block diagram oi CQ Sender, 




The reprogrammable automatic CQ Sender 
90 73 Magazine • July. 1963 



ory contents will be 
blanked unless there is a 
standby battery connected 
permanently. Providing a 
standby battery is not eco- 
nomical, at least for hams. 

ROMs (Read Only Mem- 
ory) are programmed by the 
manufacturer according to 
the consumer's require- 
ment and cannot be altered 
once programmed. But the 
programming is permanent. 
hence does not require a 
standby battery. 

PROMs (Programmable 
ROMs) are identical to 
ROMs except that they can 
be programmed by the user. 
The big disadvantage is that 
the programming cannot be 
altered once programmed. 
Hence rt will become use- 
less if the call sign of the 
user is changed. Moreover, 
PROMs require a compli- 
cated setup to program. 
The IC becomes useless if 
greatest care is not taken 
while programming. 

One is able to program 
E PROMs (Erasable PROMs) 
any number of times. They 
do not require standby 
power to retain their memo- 
ry. The contents can be 
erased by exposing the IC 
to UV lights (UVEPROMs) 
or by electrical energy 



(EEPROMs). However, for 

each programming, a com- 
plicated separate circuitry 
with different voltage sup* 
plies and UV light to erase 
the contents are required. 
Many builders do not have 
and cannot afford to have 
what is required for this 
Also, the E PROMs them- 
selves are very costly. 

Keeping all this in my 
mind. I have designed a 
"CQ Sender" which is 
equivalent to EPROM de- 
sign in operation yet uses 
no EPROMs, PROMs, 
ROMs, or RAMs. My design 
has got all the facilities you 
can get using E PROMs, yet 
it does not require any sepa- 
rate programming circuitry 
or the UV light for erasing 
the contents! At first you 
may think that it is not pos- 
sible, but I did it! 

The block diagram of 
"CQ Sender" is shown in 
Fig, 1 and the schematic 
diagram in Fig. 2 It consists 
of the following: 

• Clock-pulse generator, 
7400 IC 

• Address scan (^256 
counter), 2X7493 

• 4-line-to-16-Iine 74154 
demultiplexer 

• Diode matrix-all 1N9T4 
diodes 



• le-line-to-l-line 74150 

multiplexer 

• Switching transistor 
SL100 and relay 

The clock-pulse genera- 
tor is constructed using 2 in- 
verters (a NAND is used as 
an inverter). The clock fre- 
quency is variable, enabling 
us to set the CW speed at 
any desired level. 

The address scan is con- 
structed using two cascad- 
ed 7493 chips (each -^16 
mode) An address scan is 
nothing but a -i-256 count- 
er. It counts from to 255 
(256 states) and resets to 
and starts counting once 
again The clock output is 
fed to this counter's clock 
input. This means for every 
one clock pulse (falling 
edge) the counter advances 
by one count. The counter 
has 84>it output tines (to 
represent 255 in binary 
form we need 8 bits), and 
out of these 8 lines the first 
4 lines (starting from LSB) 
are applied to the demulti- 
plexer IC and the remaining 
4 lines to the multiplexer IC, 

The 4-rme-tch16'line de~ 
multipieKer accepts a 4-bit 
binary output address and 
has 16 output lines- If a 4-bit 
binary output address like 
01 TO is applied to it, then the 
corresponding output line 
(no. 6) will go to the low level 
leaving all the remaining 15 
output lines at high level 
Since 4 output lines of the 
7493 IC are fed to the 'out- 
put address" of this demut- 



tiplexer, each of its output 

lines will go low and remain 
there for a duration deter- 
mined by the clock fre- 
quency. 

The diode matrix: While 
programming, each dot is 
considered as 1 unit, each 
dash is considered as 3 
units, a character gap is 1 
unit, a letter gap is 3 units, 
and a word gap is 5 units. 
Whenever a dot is required, 
the output from the appro* 
priate line of the demulti- 
plexer is taken through a di- 
ode. If a dash is required, 
then the outputs from 3 
consecutive lines are taken 
through individual diodes 
and these diodes are 
bunched together These 
bunches (columns) of di- 
odes are then connected to 
the different input lines of 
the 74150 multiplexer. 

Referring to the schemat- 
ic diagram (Fig. 2), the first 
diode column consists of 8 
diodes and the second col- 
umn consists of 10 diodes. 
In the first column, the out- 
puts of lines 2, 3, and 4 are 
taken to generate a dash 
and the output of line 5 is 
not taken (for 1 unit spacel 
Then the output of line 6 is 
taken for a dot, while line 7 
rs not used {for a unit 
space). The outputs of lines 
8, 9, and 10 are taken 
through diodes (for a dash), 
the output of line 11 is not 
used (for a unit space), and 
the output of line 12 Is 
taken tor a dot. This ar- 
rangement produces the 




Interior view of the reprogrammable automatic CQ Sender. 



code ^ which is equiva- 
lent to the letter C. As per 
convention, a 3'-unit space 



o 

I 



<M 



O 



,^h 



nt «■ nr 



f 



f ^ ■ ■ 



t^ 



i H-i 






u 



^ 



is given after the letter C 
(the outputs of lines 13, 14, 
and 15 are not used}. In the 





S=^^ 






> 



CD 



4^ 



a 



f* V 



'■* * 



^ 



u 

o 



4 <* 






Or 



OftU 



< 
E 

s 
i 



JU 



8 







o 



^ . 






Al 



^ 






N 



<l U 



rt 



^ 



jj * ^ 
_ 1^ • 



+ 



« 




D 



m 



.8 



5 



u, 



f%jl fl- 



*. ,* 






t 





Ut'mt 



^ 



Fig. 2. Schematic diagram of the CQ Sender, programmed to 
cal! "CQ CQ DE VU2ARC M K." 

73 Magazine • July, t983 91 



4 £««$«» f« £0 9C >tisiAmt HilfMC WtA«£ il II 

1 ca CO »i eg Dv k vuaanc vutAvc ^rtrz^prc Jl k 

3 CQi C9 f IS1 CO t(Sir die H\iiMm vulWtC vuzjjiit fl ■ 



pijtl^T 1. kg iiie g 




neTiNa J^oiNT 



F/g. J. Improved CQ Sender with different modes. 



#19 16 LINE 
DCMUX 



I 






DIODE AftRAT 



i 1 1 1 1 1 n I 1 1 1 1 



A I C Q 

ADDRESS 
SCAN 



•iSa H 



IM 



f^® 



x^ 



^ 



r^ 



■tai 



CLOCK 



iiOOf SELECT SWITCH 

itiiuiiimriii 



ifi TO t LINE MUXH 



OUT^Ut STBOiiE 



® > 
® > 
® >■ 
® > 



O 



iJ i i i i I . 



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1 u 

H 1 r 
III 
t I I J 

III] 

i_LLL 



le TO \ LINE MU3C~2 



STWOtf OVTTVl 




RELAT DRIVER 



TO TK»<EY 



Frg, 4. B/ock diagram of the ^'Improved" CQ Sender with different modes. 



second column of diodes 
you will notice the letter Q 
is generated, in the third 
column again C (notice the 
5 -unit word space before 
this C), and in the fourth col- 
umn Q is generated. In the 
fifth column the word DE 
is programmed and so on. 
All these columns are con- 
nected to the individual 
input lines of the 74150 
multiplexer. 

The 74150 mu I tip lexer 
has 16 data-input fines, one 
output line, and 4 input ad- 
dresses. If a 4-bit binary 

92 73 Magazine • July» 1983 



code 15 applied to its input 
address, then the data-input 
iirie which is the decimal 
equivalent of the applied 
binary input address will be 
connected to its output 
fine. Suppose a binary code 
like 1000 is applied to its in- 
put address. Then data-in- 
put line 8 would be con- 
nected to its output line 
(pmlOof the74150IC), and 
during this period, what- 
ever data is fed to this input 
line would be made avail- 
able at its output line (after 
an inversion, of course) To 



make it simpler, this multi- 
plexer can be considered as 
a single -pole, 16 -way 
tlPieW) bandswitch- As 
soon as the unit is switched 
on, the pole will be con- 
nected to its first ''way" 
(bandswitch in position 1) 
and at the end of the 1 6th 
pulse (from the clock), this 
bandswitch receives a com- 
mand through its input ad- 
dress to change its position 
from the first band to the 
second band. At the end of 
the 32nd pulse, this band- 
switch moves to the third 



position and so on. At the 
16th position, the band- 
switch remains for a 
16-pulse duration, then 
switches back to its first 
band position and the cycle 
repeats 

The output of this multi- 
plexer will be a continuous 
stream of Os and Is. This 
output will then be applied 
to a switching transistor, 
SHOO. For each 1 the relay 
wilf be actuated [holds) and 
for a the relay will not op- 
erate. The relay contacts 
are used to key the trans- 
ceiver (alternately, a 
switching transistor like 
2 N 3696 could be used) 

An improved CQ Sender 
with different modes and 
an increased memory (Fig. 
3) will add either ''DX'' or 
"test" to the call and will re- 
peat the callsign three 
times. The memory of the 
modified sender is doubled 
by the addition of a second 
74150, a 7476, and an AND 
gate to create a 32'line-to-1- 
line multiplexer. This allows 
the callsign to be repeated 
three times, although it is 
programmed only once in 
the diode matrix. 

A double-pole, three-way 
switch selects the message 



to be sent. As it is pro- 
grammed in Fig. 3, the en- 
hanced CQ Sender will send 
"CQ" five times. "DE/' and 
then ^'VU2ARC" three times 
if the switch is in position 1, 
In position 2, the message 
will be ' CQ CQ DX CQ DX" 
with the same sign-off, and 
in position 3 the sender will 
emit "CQ CQ TEST CQ 
TEST/' again adding the 
same ending. In all three 
modes, it will complete the 
transmission with AR K. 

(In the prototype, the 
word QRZ was also includ- 
ed as the fourth mode. 
Later on, it was found not 
very important and hence it 
is not shown in Fig, 3 J 

Coficlusiofi 

With the RC vafues 
shown for the clock oscilla- 
tor, the generated Morse 
speed can be varied any- 
where between 8 and 15 
wpm. After caHing "CQ CQ 
DE VU2ARC AR K ' once, a 
pause of about 8 seconds 



(at 8 wpm) occurs before it 
starts calling the CQ mes- 
sage once again. During this 
8-second gap the transceiv- 
er will be in the receive 
mode to receive a possible 
repty The relay output (nor- 
mally-open contacts) can 
be connected in parallel 
with a straight key or to an 
automatic keyer. 

The power supply for this 
unit was designed using the 
7805 3-terminal 5-V voltage- 
regulator fC 

The programming can be 
altered simply by rearrang- 
ing the diode positions in 
the diode matrix. 

The circuit was assem- 
bled on a PC B and housed 
in a ready-made slim metal 
box and was demonstrated 
at our club meeting and 
also at the BEL ARC exhibi- 
tion held recently in B-anga- 
lore. The design was much 
appreciated by the engi- 
neers and by many senior 
hams like VU2GSM. 
VU2GZ, and VU21R.B 



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73 Magazine • July, 1983 93 



Yasme and the Call of Abu Ail 

ft was just a speck in the Red Sea, 
but it created pileups as big as a mountain. 



Uoyd Coivm W6KC 

im Colvin W6QL 

Vasme foundation 

Box202S 

CastfQ Valtey CA 94%4b 



Yasme was the name of 
the boat on which a ra- 
dio amateur named Danny 
Weil went forth in 1954 on a 
continuous worldwide trip 
devoted primarily to com- 
munication with other radio 
amateurs throughout the 



world. He was the first per- 
son in the world to make 
such an expedition. The Yas- 
me Foundation was formed 
and, over the last two 
decades, nearly 100 Yasme 
DXpeditJons to rare and 
semi-rare countries have 
been made with various 
operators participating. 

This is the story of the 
December, 1982, Yasme DX- 
pedition to Abu Ail, which is 
one of the rarest DX coun- 
tries in the world Prepara- 
tions and correspondence 
pertaining to the trip were in 
the making for three years, 

Abu Ail (with Jabal At 



Tair) is listed as a separate 
country by the ARRL. They 
are both islands with a light- 
house and people on them. 
Abu Ail is a 350-foot -high 
rock located in the Red Sea, 
on the major water route 
from the Indian Ocean 
through the Red Sea to the 
Suez Canal and on north to 
the Mediterranean. The 
island is well named [Arabi- 
an words meaning "Father 
AiT) because its lighthouse 
watches over and guides the 
many ships away from the 
rocks. None of them stop, 
and the lighthouse keeper 
stays there eight months at a 



time without leaving the 
lighthouse. 

Abu Ail js an international 
island owned by no one na- 
tion. On a clear day, Ethi* 
opia can be seen to the west 
and North Yeman to the 
east. 

Permission was eventual- 
ly obtained from the admin- 
istrators of the islands. The 
Compagnie Maritime Auxil- 
iare d'Outre-Mer in Dji- 
bouti—who are associated 
with Red Sea Lights of Lon- 
don—to visit the island and 
operate an amateur radio 
station there, thus making a 
DXpedition to Abu Aii possi- 



1 




Abu At! and the cliff up which everything had to be carried 

94 73 Magazine * July, 1983 




Uoyd and Iris if} the landing cove with a generator and some 
gasoline. The Fahnous is in the background. 



ble. We have been going on 
Yasme DXpeditions for 
many years and did most of 
the planning of the trip up to 
this point. Additional help 
then was needed, and fortu- 
nately, two French ama- 
teurs, Christian Dumont 
F0ECV and Jean Michel 
Cabouriaud F6GBQ, were 
recruited, (They are J28DP 
and J28DL in Djibouti.) They 
supplied generators and ad- 
ditional needed radio gear 

All four of us had to sign 
agreements that we and our 
heirs and assigns accepted 
full responsibility for any 
casualty or mishap that 
might occur We agreed not 
to interfere with the func- 
tions of the lighthouse in 
any way whatsoever. We 
agreed to take with us any- 
thing that we needed in the 
way of food, water, gener- 
ators, gasoline, and anything 
else that we might use. 

Arrtingements were made 
for passage on the Fahnous 
(Arabian word meaning 
"lamp"), the supply ship that 
services the island monthly 
with food, water, and sup- 
plies. We agreed to pay for 
our passage and for the di* 
version of the ship from its 
regular route, putting us 
ashore on Abu Ail, continu- 
ing on to Jabal At Tair, and 
then returning 48 hours later 
to pick us up. We fully un- 
derstood that the ship could 
not remain anchored near 
the island and that we must 
be ready and waiting to 
board quickly when the ship 
arrived. 

We made a list of essen- 
tials, keeping in mind that 
time was limited and that 
everything must be carried 
up the steep cliff The list in- 
cluded food and water for 
48 hours, sleeping bags, gifts 
for the lighthouse keeper, 
and our radio equipment, 
consisting of two generators 
(one 1,5 kW and one 5WJ 
Watts), gasoline, antennas, 
coax< a Yaesu 707, a Ken- 
wood S20. a Yaesu 902 DM 
transceiver, and a Heathkit 
230 amplifier 

The good ship Fahnous 
left Diibouti with the four of 



us and our equipment 
aboard at about 3:00 pm on 
December 4, 1 982. The seas 
were extremely high during 
the night but were some- 
what calmer when we ar- 
rived at Abu Ail at 8:00 am 
the following morning All 
of our equipment and our- 
selves had to be transferred 
from the ship to a smalt 
dinghy. The seas were still 
rough, and the dinghy was 
bouncing up and down 
alongside the ship as much 
as 6 feet wMth each wave. 
Both the loading of the 
dinghy and the landing 
ashore were dangerous and 
tricky. It would have been 
very easy to have lost our 
equipment or suffered in- 
jury ourselves. Fortunately, 
the only mishap was to the 
dingh\ , which hit a reef dur- 
ing the landing, causing 
some damage to its side, Af- 
ter landing, we slartecl the 
ascent up the cliff with our 
pquipmenL giving priorify to 
the actual radio gear. The 
wind blew continuously, 
making the trek up even 
more difficult, 

By about 10 am, GSACT; 
AA was on the air, using the 
vertical antenna, the Yaesu 
707, and the small gener- 
ator. A little alter noon, both 
stations were in operation 
The four of us took turns 
operating for sessions of ap- 
proximately two hours each 
At the same time, work was 
continued to bring the rest 
of the supfjiies up the hill 
and to put up doublets for 
40 meters and the new 
M)-meter band. 

We encountered a num- 
ber of minor setbacks arKl 
delays. The limited space at 
the top of the rock made it 
impossible to locate the two 
stations far enough apart for 
both to operate on some f re- 
quencies simultaneously 
without interference. The 
guys for the IH^ had to be 
located over the edge oi the 
cliff, which slowed the pro- 
cess of erecting the beam 
We also ran into some dif- 
ficulties in getting either the 
Yaesu 707 or the Kenwood 
520 on CW operation 




lean F6CBQ (left) and Uoyd W6KC erecting an antenna on 

Abu Ail. It is 350' almost straight c/own to water behind them. 






The crew at CSACt/AA. Left to right, /ean Mkhel Cabouriaud 
FbCBQ Christian Serge Dumont FOFCW Uoyd Col\in 
V\6KC. and Ins Cohm W6QL 

73 Magazine • July. 1983 95 



All obstacles were even* 
lually overcome. We stayed 
on the air continuously, op* 
erating on 5 bands, both 
phone and CW. We made 
contact with over 4000 ama- 
teurs in 105 different coun- 
tries. 

At about 6:00 am on the 
morning of December 7th, 
we sighted the Fahnous ap- 
proaching. We began dis- 
mantling the stations and 
pulling down the antennas. 
We bid farewell to the light- 
house keeper, who said that 
our visit was an exciting 
change from his usual rou- 
tine. The descent was some- 
what easier and faster than 
the ascent- The gasoline had 
been used up. and any extra 
food was left behind 

As we boarded the Fah- 
nous, we felt tired and ex- 
hausted—hut we also were 
very happy over the suc- 
cessful completion of Oper- 
ation Abu Ail 

A few observations and 
recommendations to any- 



one going on a similaf DXpe- 
d it ion are listed: 

1 Be sure that you obtain 
proper authorization and li- 
censing, in writing, well in 
advance. 

2, If possible, set up the 
complete operation, includ- 
ing all equipment (gener- 
ators, etc.), at your home 
base before going on the 
DXpedition. We did this and 
discovered and corrected a 
number of time-consuming 
problems on the test run. 
These included how to solve 
problems of guying anten- 
nas, what interference we 
could expect to find, and 
what frequencies to use 
when simultaneously oper- 
ating several stations close 
to each other We found 
that we could operate a sta- 
tion on SSB and a station on 
CW simultaneously on the 
10-meter band — but this 
could not be done on the 
other b rinds. 

3. If you are going to 
climb a steep mountain car- 



rying 50 to 80 pounds, figure 
out in advance the easiest 
way to do this. We found 
that the best thing was to 
reduce weight. Do not carry 
one pound of anything that 
is not required! 

4> Try to think of every- 
thing in advance. We had 
small lights to use for night- 
time operation, but we for* 
got to carry shades for the 
days. We had to waste some 
DXpedition time fabricating 
makeshift shades. 

5. Don't forget to bring 
earphones— we almost did. 
With the noise from gener- 
ators and two stations oper- 
ating at once, the use of 
headphones was essential. 

6. Remember to bring a 
soldering iron. Something 
will come up when it will be 
needed. We used ours on 
two occasions. 

7. Figure out in advance 
how you are going to keep 
your logs. We were so anx- 
ious to get on the air that we 
got our log-keeping of the 



two stations a little mixed 
up at the start. 

8. If you are going by sea, 
bring seasick pills and use 
them. We had the pills OK, 
but one of our operators 
thought that he wouldn't 
need them. He did. 

9. If you have any equip- 
ment requiring batteries, 
bring along extras Both of 
our keyers and one flash- 
light required battery 
changes. 

We were very lucky as to 
the ability of our operators. 
All four operators carried 
their fair share of both the 
physical work and the oper- 
ating. All operators were 
trained, experienced DXers, 
and the handling of the pile- 
ups was no major problem. 

The Yasme Foundation 
and everyone connected 
with it wish to thank the DX 
operators of the world for 
the general courtesy they 
showed in standing by until 
they could work the rare 
country of Abu Ail.B 



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73 Magazine • July, 1983 97 



m 



Make A Ibme 
For Yourself 

In 
Technical Publishing 

Wayne Green Books announces a 
September 1, 1983 deadline for sub- 
mitting manuscript proposals for the 
upcoming pubMcation list. Ideas for 
book-length manuscripts about any 
microcomputer system or area of elec- 
tronics will be considered. In addition 
to payment and royalties, we offer our 
distribution channels and the market- 
ing support your book deserves. 

Send proposals or requests for a 
copy of our Writer's Guide to: Editor, 
Wayne Green Books Peterborough, NH 
03458. Or caU toU-free 1-800-343-0728. 




Selling 73 Mag- 
azine will make 
money for you. Consid- 
er the facts: 
Fact #1: Selling 73 Magazine 
increases store traffic— our dealers 
tell us that 73 Magazine is the hot- 
test^selMng amateur radio magazine on the 
newsstands. 

Fact #2: There fs a direct correlation between 
store traffic and sales— increase the number of people 
coming through your door and youll increase sales. 
Fact #3: Fact #1 + Fact #2 = INCREASED SALES, 
which means more money for you. And that's a fact. 

For information on selling 73 Magazine, call 
800-343^728 and speak with Ginnie Boudrieau, our 

bulk sales manager. Or write to her at 73 Magazine, 

80 Pin© St., Peterborough, NH 03458. 



7S 



Amateur Radiol 

Technical Journal 



80 Plnm street Peterborough. NH 0345a 

800-343-0728 



MAKE SAVING MONEY 

A WAY OF UFE 



With LIVING ON A SHOESTRfNG: A Scrounge Manual for the 
Hobbyist. AInrtost anything you find can be put to good use if 
you follow the techniques of a master scrounger. George Ewing 
shows you how to; 
•Find electronic parts •Locate tools and other surplus 

•Scrounge by the rules •Read up on scrounging 

•Scrounge a vehicle •Scrounge a place to live 

Cartoons and case histories of scroungers add a humorous 
touch. With LIVING ON A SHOESTRING, you can't afways get 
something for nothing, but you can certainly get it for w— 
less. $7,97 Softcover. 7x9, 128 pp. approx., 

ISBN 0-88006-059 X 

Call TOLL FREE I 800 258- 547 3 for credit card orders Or mail your 
order with payment or compiete credit card information. Incrude 
i 1 ,50 for shipping and handling. Send to: 

Wayne Green Inc. 

Attn: Book Sales 

Peterborough, NH 03458 

A Wayne Green Pubftcatton EJealer Inquiries Invited 




YES, I want to scrounge! 337B6L 

Send me copies of LIVING ON A SHOESTRING. 

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98 73 Magazine • July, 1983 



SOCIAL EVENTS 



charge oa t spac^^iraffatfe t3A&is. Tfm foi- 
fowfng inform^fiofi sftoufd b& ittcfudmi in 
every anr^ouncmmmnr: sponsof, ^mat, aat^ 
time, f>iac^ c/iy, swtv^ Mdmissioti dimge ^ 
an>^ foatums. mfk-m fr^qvieftcfQS, amf fhe 
name of whom to cofttBCt foftunhermfomtQ- 
tiort, Announc^mentB must be mcsevetJ by 73 
Mag:ai^n« b^ the first of the month, two 
monms prior to the month in which the eveni 
takes piace. Mait to Emohat Offices, 73 Moq- 
azine. Pine St., f^tertorough NH 0345A 

MAPLE BiOQE fiC CAN 
JUL 2-3 

ITie Maple R(dg@ ARC v\im hold Its Harn^ 
feat '83 on July 2-3, 1983, at the Mapl^ 
ftidge Fa I rfl rounds, 30 miles east of Van* 
couvef pn Hlgtiway W7; The faglstratEor^ 
fee for hams Is $500 and for non-liams 
over 12, S2.00. Features will include a 
swap and shop, tjurniy hunts, ladies' and 
children's pro^rama, and displays. Food 
and lots ot camper space (some with 
hydro) wHi be available. Talk-in on 
146.2(y.80 and t46.34/.94. For reigistration 
inFormation [20% off fof pre-fegistrationK 
comact Bob Haughton VE7BZH, Box 292, 
Maple mage BC V2X fG2. Canada. 

SH£LLSVtLLE FA 
JUL 4 

The HB^rh9t>vvg Radio Amateyr Club will 
sponsor the annual Firecracker Ham test on 
Monday, Jy ly i, 1963. at the Sheiisville VFW 
picnic grounds, Extt 127 (foMow signs 2 
mMes to SheiisvHie), i^i. north of Hairfs- 
burg. Admission fs $3 00, XYLs and children 
will be admitted tree, and there wIN be no 
charge for tall gating. There wfN be plenty of 
parking, shade trees, tables, and a pavilion. 
Talk-in on .16/76 or .521.52 simpEek. Far 
additional del a I la and table resenratiDnSt 
contact KA3HZW, 131 Livingston Street, 
Swatara PA 171 13, or phone (717>^^-4%7, 

SPOKANE WA 

JUL e- to 

The 5-ata!e ARI^L iHorlli western DlvislDn 



Coftv^tion wtH be heid on July 6-10, 1963, 
at the Spo^ar>e Corwention C^iter, Spo- 
kane WA. The Spokane Swapfest (nomiaJ^y 
in April) will be combined this year with the 
convention as will be the flea market Reg^ 
istration is $5,00 and swap tables atb 
SIO.OO. Events will include displays by marh 
ulacturers ami dftalef s, seminars on anterv 
nas, computers, VHF/EME, weather, traffic 
handling, and repeat ef operatlori. There will 
l>e ARRL and advisory committee forums. 
Ladies^ programs w^li Inclucie a funcheon 
and style show. The Saturday-night ban- 
quet will feature Roy Neal, NBC news oor^ 
respondent, and the Royal Order of the 
Woutf Hong ceremony will follow at mid- 
night ^$1 admission), The DX breakfast and 
church services will be on Sunday mornlngn 
Close-in RV parking is available. For addi- 
tional Inforn^atlon, write NorthwasC'SS, PO 
Box 3933, Spokane WA 90220. 



FAniBAULT MM 
JULd 

The Faribault Anriateur Radio Club will 
ho^ Its 2nd annual swapfest on Saturday, 
Jufy 9, 1983, tiom 9:00 arti to 3:00 pm. at lh« 
Rice County Fairgrounds on the north ed^e 
Of FajibauFi MN. Gei>efai admisston is 
S t JQ, admission and selling spiace is S3. DO 
(liKloor or outdoof), and tables (7-fc»t and 
by pre-regtstraiion oftty) are $3iK each. 
LuTN^ anct free parking will be available. 
There will be amateur radio and computer 
gear as w«ll as electronic equiprT>ent dis- 
piayed. Talk -In on 146.1 9/. 79. For more intor- 
matk^n, conlact Donald Klier, 1116 NW Bth 
Street. FaribauH MN 55021, 



OAK CREEK Wl 

JUL 9 

The South Milwaukee Amateur Radio 
Club wif I hold Its annual swapfest on Satur- 
day, July 9, 1983, from 7:00 am to approKl- 
mateiy 5:00 pm, at the American Legion 
POat *434, 9327 South Shepafd Avenue, 
Oak Creek Wl Admission is $3.00 per per- 
son and includes a ''Happy Hour" with free 
beverages. Parking, a public picnic area, 



hot and cold sandwfches, and llQurd re- 
freshments will be available on the 
grounds^ There will be free overnight camp- 
ing, l»kk4ti on t46.94. For mofe details, ift* 
cFudIng a local map. write Soutfi Milwaukee 
Amateur Radio CEub. Ino^, PO Box l<XL 
Soulh Mtiwaukee Wl 53172-0102. 

STATE COLLEGE PA 
JUL 9 

Thv NIttany Amateur Radio Cfub will 
twid a tiamf^^l and computer fair on 
Saturday, July 9, 1963, tieginning at 6:00 
am. at the Pleasant Gap Firemen's Pariii^ 
Route 144, Piea&ant Gap PA (|usl off 
Route 26, «ast of State College), TicKeis 
are S3.00; tail gating spaces are S5.00. 
Talk-In on 14e.1&.7B and 143.25^.85. For 
further Information, write Dave Buck- 
waiter KG3CL, l6dSClrcleville Road, Stale 
College PA 16801, or phone [S14^234~07^. 

MILTON ONT CAN 

JUL 9 

The Burlington Amateur Radio CIgb, Inc., 
will host the ninth annual Ontario Hamfest 
on Saturday. July 9, 19^, at the MM ton Fair- 
grounds. For more information, write Bur- 
lington Amateur Radio Club. Inc, PO Box 
636, Burlington ONT L7R 3Y7, Canada, 

CROSS VI LLETN 
JUL 6-10 

The Plateau Amateur Radio Club will 
hold the Cmssvllle Hamfest on July 9-10, 
1963, at it^ Cumberland County Commu- 
ntly Compiffi^ Highway 70 North, Crosa* 
villa TN, Admission is SI. 00 for adults. Ex* 
hit^t and fiea-martcet space will be avall- 
abte on a first-come basis. There will be a 
Dutch-treat drnrier on Saturday nighl, 
Talk^ln on 147.Q3/.33. For further info^ 
matlon, contact the Plateau Amateur 
Radio Club. PO Box ^£1, CrossvlJLe TN 
38555. 



ALEXANDEfl NY 
JULIO 

The Genesee Radio Amateurs, Inc., will 
hold the ARRL-approved third annual 
BatavlB Ham fast on Sunday, July 10, 1983, 
from 6:00 am to 5:00 pm, at the Alexander 
Fireman's Grounds, Rte. 96, Alexander NY 
Cd miles south of Beta via). Registration la 
S2.0O in advance and S3.00 at the gate. 
Features will Include a large exhibit area. 



OM and YL program s, con! eat S4 a boat- 
anchor auction, and overnight camping. 
Food will be avaifal^la. Talk^tn on 6.52 or 
4.7iJ5-3l (W2RCX). For nKire inform at I on 
or advance tickets (make checks payable 
to BatavIa Hamf^t). write do GRAM, PO 
BoK 572. BatAvia NY 14020. 

INDfANAPOilS IK 
JULIO 

Tfw Incfiana State Amateur Radio Con* 
vaiitlon, in conjunction w*th ihe Indianap* 
04l« Htmfe«t and Computef Show, wIN 
t» held on Sijnday, Jufy 10, 1963, at the 
Mar1<jini County Fairgrounds at the south- 
eastem Intersection of h74 and 1^465. Gal9 
tickets are S4.00 and entllie you to all ac* 
tlvittes. There will be inside ar»d outside f les 
markets* a separate computer show and 
flea market, a commercial vendor's display 
area, technical forums, club activltieB, 
ladies' activities, and professional food sar^ 
vices. There will be setups after 12:00 noon 
on Saturday, July 9th. Security will be pro- 
vided Saturday night and Sunday, and 
camper hookup facliittes will be available 
on the grounds. For further information, 
contact tndlanapoiis HamfesI, Box 11066, 
Indiajiapoila IN 46201, 

DOWNERS GROVE IL 
JUL1JQ 

Tfie DuPafie Amateur Radio Club Narrv 
fast/Com puterf est will be held on Sunday, 
Juiy 10. 1963. from 9i>0 am to 4.i00 pm, at 
the American Legion Post grounds, 
Downers Grove IL Tickets are S2.D0 and 
will be available only at the gate. There 
will be food, drinks, and plenty of parking 
space, as well as a iar^e outdoor ties 
market Taik-in on 144.39/145.49. Po/ more 
infom^ation, send an SASE lo W90UP, PO 
Boi 7t. Ciarendoo HJlla IL 6D514, or call 
P12)-971-11S6. 

MONTANA-ALBERTA CAN 

JUL 15^t7 

The 49tti Glacier- Wat erlon International 
Hamfest will be held on July i&-17» 1963, at 
Waterton Homestead Campground, Just 
north of Waterton Nat ton a I Park entrance 
on Highway 6 (Alberta, Can,). There will bfl 
a bunny hunt, technical Sessions, enter- 
tain ment, and swap tables. For more infor- 
mation and pre-regtstration, write PO Box 
146, Milk River, Alberta TOK IMO, Caji. 

CQfttifme^ 



SWR and POWER METER 



DPM-1 



MACAWS DPM'l SWR/Power Meter has a 

frequency range of f.8 to f SO MHz and a 

power range of 0-20. 200 sna lOOOW in 

three ranges. The DPM- 1 rs compact 

lightweight and measures SWR ^nd power 

simufraneousfy. onfy S49.9B Frerght Prep^Jd 

Anywhere In U.S. Order by telephone 

or mail: 



PO^A^I 




OltTHCMI 



swRssm. 




WATTS 



SWR K POWER METen 

MACAW 



POWEi 



fKkWER 



swu 



iSOMHi 



*OW 
SOOM^ 

rooow 



FWD 



VISA 
MASTERCHARGE 




A/IACAW 

*^236 



ELECTRONICS INC 

5355 Aventda Enemas • Dept. B 
Carlsbad CA 92008 • (619) 438-2326 



^See Usf of Att^ntsers an page f14 



73 Magazine • Jaly, 1983 



CARY NY 
JUL1€ 

The Cary Amat&ur Radio Ctub will hold 
tie eleventh annual Mid-Sumnner Swaptest 
on Saturday. July 16, 1963, from 9:00 am to 
3:00 pm, at the Lion's Club Shelter (next to 
Gary Sen io r H tgh Schoo I) , Gary N C Th ere i s 
no admission or commission charge. Fea- 
tured will be an open auction at 1:00 pm. 
Talk-in on 146-28/.8S. 14775/. 15, and 14652 
simplex. 

SHEBOYGAI^ Wl 
JULlfi 

The annual Sheboygan County Amateur 
Radio Club Lakeshore Swapfest and Brat 
Fry will be held on July 16. 1963^ from IOlM 
am to 4:00 pm, at the Wilson Town Hall, 
south of Sheboygan WL Tables are free and 
camping Is available at Terry Andre State 
Park. There wHI also be a publtc auction. 
For a Myer and other Information, write PO 
Box B95, Sheboygan Wl 53081, or phone 
(414HS7-3203. 

AUGUSTA NJ 
JUL 16 

The Sussex County Amateur Radio 
Club will hoJd Its fifth annual hamfest, 
SCARC 83. on Saturday, July 16, 1983, at 
the Su&sex: County Farm and Horse Show 

grounds. Plams Road, off US Highway 
206, Augusta NJ, fust north of Newlon- 
QeneraJ registration is $2.00. There will be 
acres of free parking and outdoor flea- 
market space. P re-re gist rat ion for seMers 
Is $4.00 (S5.00 at Ihe gate). There will be a 
huge building for indoor sellers and pre- 
registratlon is $5.00 (E6.00 at the gate). 
Taik'in on 147.90^30 and 146.52. For more 
information or registration, write Lloyd 
Buobholtz WA2LHX, 10 Black Oak Drive, 
RD1, Vernon NJ0M62. 

MANCHESTER NH 
JUL 16 

The New Hampshire FM Association 
will hold an eiectronics flea mafkel on 
Saturday. July 16, 19S3. beginning at 9:00 
am, at the Manchester Municipai Airport. 
General admission Is $1.00 per person 
(sellers. S5,00), Sellers should tailgate or 
bring iheir own table. Commercial dis- 
plays are welcome. Refreshments will be 
available. Talk-in on 146.52 FM. For p re- 
registration, write NHFMA, Inc., 30 Mead- 
owglen Drive, Manchester NH 03103. For 
further information^ contact Dick Des- 
Rosiers WIKGZ at [603}-668-88&0 or Doug 
Aiken K1WPM, 30 Meadowgten Drive, 
Manchester NH 03103. St t6O3)-62£-0B3 1 

EUGENE OR 
JUL 16-17 

The 8th annual Lane County Ham Fair 
wm be held on July 16-17. 1983. at the 



Oregon National Guard Armory, 2515 C^n- 
tenniaL Eugene OR. Registration is ¥4,00 
and swap tables are $5.00 each {2 maxi- 
mum). Doors will open at 8:00 am both 
Saturday and Sunday and there wHI be a 
pot luck supper at 6:00 pm on Saturday, 
Features wiii include a 2-meter bunny 
hunt, computer demos, technical semi- 
narst swap tables, bingo, & Kiddie Korner, 
and women s activities. An all-day snack 
bar and free parking for RVs (no hookups} 
will be available, Taik-in on .52/. 62, 
146.28/88, and 147.B6/.26. For tickets or 
swap tabies, send a check payable to 
Lane County Ham Fair to Tom Temby 
WB7WPU, Treasurer, 3227 Crocker Road. 
Eugene OR 97404, or phone {503)-6S9- 
1761, 

PALMYRA IL 
JUL 16-t7 

The Quad-Co, Amateur Radio Ciub will 
sponsor the 26th annual Hamfest of the 
Breakfast Club on July 16-17, l&eS, at 
Terry Park, 3/4 mi le east of Paimy ra \ L. Pre- 
registration until July 7, 1913, is $1.50 |at 
the gate $2.00). Camping facilities will be 
open from Friday afternoon until Monday 
morning. There will be games, contests, 
golfing^ fishing, gear swapping, and on 
Saturday night, dancing and movies. 
Bnng your own basket lunch; sandwiches 
and soft drinks will be available on the 
grounds. Talk- in on 3S73 kHz from noon 
Saturday until 1 tiOO am Sunday. For more 
information, write Hamfest, c/o Quad-Co, 
ARC, 602D East Walnut, Chatham IL 
62629. 

LAPORTE IN 
JUL 17 

The combined LaPorte-IVIichigan City 
Amateur Radio Giubs will hold their Sum- 
merHamfe^t on Sunday, July 17, 1983, from 
6:00 am to 2:00 pm, at the LaPorte County 
Fairgrounds, State Road 2, west of LaPorte 
IN- The donation ts $3.00 at the gate. Good 
food, cold drinks, and paved outdoor park- 
ing will be availabie. For reservations for in- 
door tables t405i/footK write PO Bom 30^ 
LaPorte IN 46350, 

EDGEWATER PARK NJ 
JUL 17 

The 5th annuai West Jersey Radio 
Amateurs Hamfest will be held on Sun- 
day, July 17, 1SB3. 9:00am to 3:00 pm, rain 
or shine, at the Super 1 30 Orive-ln Theatre, 
Route 130, Edge water Park NJ {2 miles 
south of Burlington, 9 miles north of 
Paimyra). Registration is $3.00 and tall- 
gating is $3.00 (sellers must bring their 
own tables). Early setup for vendors only 
is at 7:00 am. Talk-in on 147.75/. 15, 
144.87/.47, and 146.52. For further infor- 
mation or to order lickets, send an SASE 



HAM HELP 



I need the schematic and circuit data for 
the Comdel speech processor. 

XT. MaloneyW28E 

152 Hawkins Rd. 

Certtaraacti NY 11720 

Could someone provide me with Q3L in- 
formation for 9J2DS and TYAi i? 

Rick Todd NSCWX;DU2 

PSC #2 Box 12956 

APO San FraneiscD CA 96311 



I am looking for the schematic for an SBE 

Touch-Corn 40. 

LIsIa T. Nines K2QLA 

4 Ellwood Awt, 

Cortland N¥ 1304S 

I need a source for a 1N23B diode used in 
a General Radio Slotted Line 674. 

Rudoff E. Six KAeOBL 

30725 Tennessee 

RosevlllQ m 4fi066 



to Mary Lou Shontz N2CLX, i07 Spruce 
Lane. Route 1 6, Mount Holly NJ 08060, or 
phone (609)-267'3063. 

CANTON OH 
JUL 17 

The Tusco ARC (WBZX) and the Canton 
ARC (WaAL) will present the9lh annual Hall 
of Fame Hamfest on Sunday, July 17, 1983, 
at the Nimlshillen Grange, 6461 EaSton 
Street, Louisville OH. Tickets are $2.50 In 
advance, $3.00 at the gate, and children 
under 16 will be admitted free. Flea-market 
parking la S2.00 and tables are available on 
a reserved basis at $3.50 each. A check 
must accompany reseivatlons. There will 
be forums, dealers, a flea market, food^ 
and XYL activities, Taik-ln on 146.52 and 
14772/.12, For resen^altons or more infor- 
mation, contact Butch Lebold WABSHP, 
10877 Hazeivlew Avenue, Alliance OH, or 
phone (2l6)-821-8794. 

iOWLfNG GREEN QH 
JUL 17 

The 19th annuai Wood County Ham-A^ 
Rama will be held on Sunday, July 17, 1&83, 
beginning at 8:00 am, at the Wood County 
Fairgrounds, Bowling Green OH. Admis- 
sion and parking are free. Trunk sales and 
food will be available. Advance table rent- 
als are $5.00 and are for dealers only. Sat- 
urday will be available for setups until 8:00 
pm. Talk-in on ,52. For more information 
or dealer rentals, send an SASE to Wood 
County ARC, c/o Craig Henderson, Box 366, 
LucKey OH 43443. 



POUGHKEEPSIE NY 
JUL 23 

The Mt. Beacon Amateur Radio Club will 
hoid its annuai ARRL hamfest on July 23. 
1983, from 8:00 am to 3:00 pm, at the Arllng 
ton Senior High School, Poughkeepsie/[_a- 
g range, Dutchess County NY. Admission is 
S2.00 (XYL and your children will be admit- 
ted free), tailgating space is $3.00 [inqtudes 
one free admission), and a table space Is 
$4.00 (includes one free tabie and admis- 
sion). Hot food, beverages, and tree parking 
wiil be availabie, There will be an auction 
beginning at 2:00 pm. Talknn on 146.37/.97 
and 146,52, For additional information, 
write Art Holmes WA2TiF, 2 Straub Dnve. 
Pleasant Valley NY 12569, (914)-635'2614,or 
Wait Sutkowski i<2DPL, W. Redoubt f^oad, 
FishKill NV 12524, (914)^097-5158. 

GLENWQOD SPRINGS CO 
JUL 23 

The Ski Country Amateur Radio Ciub wiil 
hoid its second annual swapfest on July 23, 
1983, at Colorado Mountain Coiiege. 1402 
Blake Avenue. Glen wood Springs CO. 
There Is no admission charge. Tabies are 
$5.00 each, Taik in .07/.67, For further infor- 
mation, contact Frank WA08BL Box 280. E! 
Jebel CO 81628. 

WELLINGTON OH 
JUL 23 

The Northern Ohio Amateur Radio 
Society will hold NOARSFEST on Satur- 
day , J u 1 y 23, 1 983. fro m 8 :O0 am to 5:00 pm , 
al the Lorain County Fairgrounds, Route 
18, 1/2 mile west of Route 58. Wellington 
OH. Donations are $2.50 in advance and 
$3,50 at the gate. Children under 12 wiii be 
admitted free. Parking for the fiea market 
Is $1.00 per car space. Flea-market setup 
is from 6:00 am to 8:00 am. Pienty of free 
parking will be aval iable i n a large general 
parking ^r^s^. indoor exhibit spaces with 
an 8-foot tabie are $8.00 each. Send check 
for advance registration to Don Winner 
WD8flZG, 8927 Torrance Avenue, Brook- 



lyn OH 44144, Of phone (21 6)-749-6594. 
There will be refreshments and 807s wiii 
be furnished by NOARS. Campers may 
park overnight Friday al no charge but no 
hookups will be available. Talk-in on 
146.52/.52 tK8KRG) and 144.55/145.15. For 
admission lickets. write NOARSFEST, PO 
Qojc 354, Lorain OH 44052. 

SEATTLE WA 
JUL 29-31 

The Western Washington DX Club 
(W7FR) v^ill host the 31st annual North- 
west DX Convention on Friday, Saturday, 
and Sunday, July 29^31, 1983, at the Dou- 
ble Tree Plaza Hotel, located near the 
South Center Shopping Mail and the 
Seattle-Tacoma Airport. There will be a 
Saturday night banquet and a Sunday 
morning breakfast, as well as speakers, 
si ides, symposia, and awards. Taik-ln on 
146.40/147.00 (W7FR). For registration, 
contact Ruth Bennett WA7i^VA, 6729 
Beach Drive 3W. Seattle WA 98116, or 
phone (206)-932-1335, For further Informa- 
tion, corttaci WA7RVA or Roy Foots 
N7AIF, Chairman, 3029 4ath Avenue SW. 
Seattle WA 98116, or phone f206}-935- 
6041. 

OKLAHOfWA CITY OK 
JUL 29-31 

The Central Oklahoma Radio Amateurs 
wiil hold the ARRL Stale Convention at 
Ham Holiday 'S3 on July 29-31, 1983, al the 
Myriad Convention Center; Oklahoma City 
OK. Pre-registratlon is $6.00 (S7.00 at the 
door). Children age 12 and under will be ad- 
mitted free with a parent. Every pre-regis- 
trant may buy one flea market table for 
$1.00. in addilion to the noncommercial 
fiea market, there will be displays, forums, 
programs, special group meetings, and a 
buffet and dance on Saturday night. Ample 
parking wiil be available and hotel accom^ 
modations with special Ham Holiday rates 
are nearby. For further information or pre^ 
registration forms, write CORA, PO Box 
14266, Oklahoma City OK 73113. 

CUMBERLAND ME 
JUL 30 

The Blackstrap Repeater Association 
will hoid the second annual Greater New 
England Hamfest on Saturday, July 30, 
1983, from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, at Cumber- 
land Fairgrounds, Cumberland ME Tick- 
ets are SI. 00 in advance and $2.00 at the 
gate. There will be forums, exhibits, 
meetings, speakers, dealers, and a giant 
flea market. Food and free camping will 
be available. Talk-in on 147,69/.09, 146.52, 
3.940, and 146.1 3/. 73. For more informa- 
tion, call Ed Will lams KA1FZD at t207)- 
846-3509. 

tSHPEMING Ml 
JUL 30 

The Hiawatha Amateur Radio Associa- 
tion of Marquette County, in celebration of 
its SOth anniversary^ will sponsor the 35th 
annual Upper Peninsula Hamfest on July 
3Q, 1983, from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm, al the 
Michigan National Guard Armory in Ish- 
peming. Registration is $1.00 and tallies 
will be available for $3.00 each. Features 
will include a computer demonstration and 
net meetings. Talk-in on 146.16/76. For 
more information, contact George Lehtinen 
W8IOC. 100 N. Daisy, R2, ishpemlng Ml 
49849, or phone (906) 4S5-5038. 

ASHEVILLE NC 
JUL 30-31 

The Western Garoflna Amateur Radio 
Society will sponsor the WCARS Hamfest 
and Computer Fair of 1983 on July 30-31, 



100 73 Magazine * July, 1983 



1963, tFogirinkng at 9:00 am, at Ihe Bun- 
combie County FJ reman -g Training Gentefp 
A$h«vnie NC. Feat urea will include an 
ABRL tioQtti and saminaf by Bob Grove 
WA4PVQ. McElfov MenKjftaJ CW compfr 
titioii. a ft«a ffiarHet, bin go, RV parking 
and free camping ifto hogkups), and conv 
puter ?iafdwar« and software. Talk-in on 
.31/91. .6l/.7i, ajnd .52 ^impieK. For ticket 
information, write Garland Lance NG4N« 
S54 Sandriill Road. As^ev^ie NC 28806. 

0UVER BC CAH 
JUL 30-31 

The Okanaoan Int&maiional t-iamfest 
wiH J^e held on July 3C^31, T9fi^, at Oliver 
Centenniai Park. OMvsr BC^ Reglstratrofi 
will be at 9:00 am (PDT) on Saturday, July 
30ih and the actlvliiea will t>e from 1:00 pnt 
on Saturday through 2:30 pm on Sunday. 
YLs may bring crafts, hobbiea, and fJea- 
market Items for sale or dispjay. Tliere will 
be a potluck luncheon on Sunday, as well 
as emertalnmani and bunny hunts. Talk-ln 
on the .34/.d4 repeater or .76/. 76. For further 
Information (no advance resen^atlons), 
write John Juu I -Andersen VE7DTX, 8802 
LakevJaw Drive, Vernon BC VI 8 1W3 or 
Lota Harvey VE7DKU 584 Heather Road. 
Pentlcton BC V2A 1W8. 

ALfXA>iORlA LA 
JUL 30-31 

The Central Louisiana Amateur Radio 
C(ub will hold a hamf««t dfi Saturday and 
Sunday. July 30-3 1, 1963, at the Bolton 
Avenue Community Center, Aiexandria LA. 
Qw&fi tables will be svai ladle. 

BELVIOEAE IL 

JUL 31 

The Bel vide re Amateur Radio Associa- 
tion will tiiold Its annual ham lest on July 
31. 1983, at the Boone County Fair- 
grounds. Route 70. Selvidere IL Admis^ 
sion is $2-00 In advance and S2.50 at the 
door. TableG may be reserved for $2.00. 
There will be plenty of free flea-market 



spaces andp If It rains, there will be Inside 
space available. There will be camping on 
Sat Uf day niflht. TaJk-(n on 146.52. For 
more information, contact Dob Anderson 
K9DCG. 910 Locust Street, Belvidere IL 
€1008. 



CEMTflEVILLE Ml 
JUL3t 

The Amateur Radio Public Service 
Association of Saint Joseph County Ml will 
hokt it& 5th annual swap and st^op on Sun- 
day, July 31. 1963, at the Saint Joseph 
County Fairgrounds, Centreville ML Doora 
will open at 8:00 am. Tickets are £2.00 in ad- 
vance and $3,00 at the gate, indoor tables 
are $3,00; trunk sales are free. Camping will 
be available on Saturday night only for 
$6.00. Talk^in on 32. For more information, 
contact Warren Harder NQEOX, 14820 
Broadway Road, Three Rivers Ml 49093. 

JACKSQN WY 
AUG 5-7 

The 1983 ARRL Rocky Mountain Division 
Convention, In conjunction with the 51st 
WIMU Ham fast, will be held on August 5-7, 
1983. at the Virginian Motel, Jackson WY, 
Toik In on 146^^82 and ,3923 kHi For rea- 
ervatlons, call the Virginian at QQ7y733- 
2792, For more information, phone R. L 
"Pete" Stull WB7AMP at (307^382 9032 or 
Dove Gregory N7COA at t307>S75-5324. 

MOBERIV MO 
AUG 7 

The MEMO ARC of Kirksvilie MOand Ihe 
Tri-County ARC of Motherly MO will hoid the 
5th annual l^rth Missouri Hamfest on Sun- 
dBf, August 7, 1983, at tfie Moberty MynK^pat 
Auditortuin. Motherly MO. The auditorium 
has 12,000 square feet of atr-conditioned 
qiaoe for the inside f^a market and there will 
be a limited number of tables availabfe free. 
Tickets are $1-50 in advanceor$2 50 at the 
door. []N3ars w M I open for t h e f lea market and 
d istri bu tors begi nnl n g at S:00 wn and for t he 



ii amies t, from9.0O am until 3:00 pm. There 
will be forums, films, sandwicheSp and drinks, 
as well as donate and coffee for the early 
birds. Ta^in on 147.6@v.09. For more informa- 
tion and/or tickets, contact Sam Fiscfier 
KAeiLO, PO Box 341, Mobedy MO 89270. 

AMGOLA m 
AUG 7 

Tho Steuben County R^:llo Amateurs wHI 
hold their 25lh annual FM Rcnic ar^d Ham- 
fest orv Sunday^ August 7, 1933, at Croolced 
Lake, Angoia tN. Admission is S2,50, Fea- 
tures will include plcnic-styie BBO chicken, 
Inside tables for extiibitors and vendors, a 
iarge elect rofilcs flea market, and overnight 
camping (fee charged by county park). Talk- 
In on 146.52 and 147.81/^1. 

AUSTIN TX 
AUG 12-14 

The Auatfn Amateu r Radio Ciub and the 
Austin Repeater Organiziation will apoh- 
sor Austin Summerfest 'B3 on AugusL 
12-14, 1983, at the Austin Marriott Hotel 
Interstate 35 a! Highway 290. Admission 
is $5.00 in advance and $6.00 at the door. 
Swap feat tabfes are available on a first- 
come. first-served basis, but each seller 
may also reserve one tab^ In advance for 
$1.00. Summerfest '83 will combine the 
Texas VHF-FM Society Convention with 
forums, meetings, an indoor swapfeat, 
dealer exhibits, and many outside activl- 
t las r or the fa mi ty at Austi n's annual Aqua 
Festival Talk-inon 14d,34^.94. For more in- 
formati^on. write Austin Summertest 'S3. 
PO Box 13473. Austin TX 7S71 L 

DUNKIRK NY 
AUG 13 

The Lake Erie International Kami est A$> 
SOC'^^tion will hold its fifth annual Lake Erie 
lntefnaik>nal Ham f est on Saturday, August 
13, 1983, !>eg Inning at 8:00 am, at the Ghau- 
tauqua County Fairgrounds. Dunkirk NY. 
Admission is $250 In advance and $300 al 
the gate. Each liea-market space is $100 



ptua admission. There will be indoor dealer 
eKhibits as well as a large flea market. Talk- 
in on 146,25^,85 and 146.52, Fof more infor- 
mation, write Lake Er^e iniernailOiflal Ham- 
fest. PO Box 455, Dunkirk HY 1404a 

POINOHA CA 

AUG 13 

ThaTrJ-County Amateur Radio Associa- 
tion wtU sponsor the TCARA 13lh Annual 
Hamfest and Picnic on Saturday, August 
13, 1903, from 8:00 am to S^OO pm. al the 
Los Angeles County Fairgrounds m Po- 
mona CA, Tables will tie available for 
ham/computer exhibits and displays. 
There will be sandwiches and Solt dftnks 
availabie. For more information^ contact 
Tony Skvarek W6ELZ. 1514 W. Mission 
#14, Pomona CA 91766. 

BURLINGTOI^ VT 
AUG 13-14 

The Burlington Amateur Radio Club will 
hoid Its annual International Hamfest and 
Flea Market on August 13-14, 1983, at the 
Old Lantern CampgroundSH Charlotte VT. 
For both days, tickets are $4.00, outdoor 
flea- market spaces are $2.00, and indoor 
spaces are $5.00. Food and drink wlli be 
available, Taik-in on .34/.94, .01/.61. and 
,52 simplex. For further infontiatton, con- 
tact Frank WiCTM, Burlington Amateur 
Radio ClutJ. F>0 Box 312, Burilnglon VT 
05402, 

WILLOW SPRTNGS it 
AUG 14 

The Hamf esters Radio Club, Inc^ will 
hold their 49lh annuaJ hamfesi and picnic 
on Sunday. August 14, 1983. ai Santa Fe 
^rk, 91 St and WoH Road. Willow Spnngs tL 
(southwest of Chicagoi. Tickets are $2 00 in 
advance and $3.00 at the gate, Featured will 
tte the famous swappers' row. There will be 
eK hi bits fof OMs and XYL$. For advance 
tickets, send a check or money order and 
an BASE to Ham festers, PO Box 42792, 
Chicago I L6064E 




lO^YEAR LICENSES 

Hoping to &ave both time and nKmey, 
the FCC has proposed that the length of 
amateur ii censes be ex landed to 10 years, 
with a 2>year grace period for renewing ex- 
pired licefiaes. In its coiThments, the Com- 
mission noted that license renewals, 
which were up to 36,lXiO in 1982, would be 
raduced to atwut 12.000 per year. Jn adcS^ 
tion, the numt>er of licenses which are al- 
lowed 10 lapse inadvertent (y would de- 
crease, according to tt>e FCC. 

Hare is the Commission's proposed 
Part 97 amendment, as it appeared in the 
Fsdmal Roister. 

PART 97— r AMENDED] 

Appendix 

11 is prupe^d in timond Pari 97 of the 
CommiBfilori Rul**, 47 CFR Part 97, aji 
follows: 

1. ]n I 07,13. paragraph (d) would be 
revised to te&d at fa I lows: 



§97.13 n«ft«iv«f 



[d] If « license ifl Allowed to expire;, 
iipphcatiun for rttoewal may be made 



during i period ofgrHirre of two yean 
afit-r the t)K|rtrBl(on dak^ Dortng ttiit 
two yenr period uf grace^ an expired 
liceruw IS nut valid. A licence renewed 
during the grac« penod wil] b« dafed 
cuinenlly and will not be backdated to 
the date of iti expirstiatL Appli^stitm 
for reniwal $h«IJ b« fubimtted on FCC 
Form 810 afid ihalL be accompanied by 
ihr applicant! expired license. 

(2) in ^clion 97.47. paragraph fb) 
would be revised tu read as folio wi: 

f ir.47 nen»w»l mrnifor modlfkvUofi erf 
•fluatitMr »lflUon li<e«fl**, 
■ ■ > * » 

(b) [fa hcense is allowed to exptrc, 
application for renewal may be made 
during a pehud of grace of tivo years 
after the expiratiuit date. During this 
two year period of grace, an expired 
llcenae is not valid, A license renewal 
during the griico period will he dated 
currently and will not be backdaled to 
the djjie Lf o^cpifution. An applitetlon 
fur Ein Individual stalion license shall be 
submitted on FCC Form 610. An 
application for an amateur club or 
mtlitaiy recreabon statiori Ifrense shall 
be submitted on FCC Form 610-B- In 
every case the appilcarion shall be 
accompanied by ^e apphcanl't expired 
licriiBa or ■ photocopy theroL 



I'S) in Section 07.59, paragritphi (a] 
and {h] would be revised \o read as 
fnllowi: 

j 97.S9 Ue*iu« tarm. 

(a) Amateur operator License* ^re 
normaJly iralid fcf a pcnod of len yi^ars 
from the d<dte of ismance of a new, 
modified or renewed license, 

fb) Amateur statiun bcenses are 
normaliy vabd for a period of ten year* 
from the date of iiisuai^ce of a nns. 
modified or renewed bcenite. Ail 
an^a reur stab on licenscL re^aidliesa of 
when lisued. wiU e:ipire on tbe soipc 
dttle aa the bccnseg's aisdUnr opentof 
Ltcen^a. 



20M PHONE EXPANSION 

After a thred-year tiattfe. ttie 20-meter 
ptkone't^and expansion went into effect on 
May 22. The new frequency allocation gave 
Generai-c lass operators use of the frequen- 
cies between 14.5:25 WH^ and 14.275 MHz, 
Advanced-class licensees have phone pri vl* 
leges tietween 14.175 and 14.225 MHz, and 
Extra-class ticket hoiders are allowed to 
operate phone from 14.150 to 14.175 MHi, 
The Commission's amendments to Part 97, 
as published in the Feo^era/ Regi&wr, are 
shown below. 



PAflT 07-CAMENOED] 

Pkrt g7 of the Commfition'i Rulea and 
Reguiatiofii. 47 CFR Part 97, la amended 
ti foUowi; 



1, In 9 07.7p paragraph (a] 1» revlied to 
reed af followa: 

1 17.7 PrivHa g e a of ofMratof Wc an e ea . 

[a) Amateur Extra and Advanced 
Clesa. All euthorized amateur privilege* 
L[^cLudlng exclusive frequency operating 
authority In accordance with the 
(oUqwIii^ table: 



9a00~16i»Wi. 

trrt-jeoa tHi- 






7lHO-f]9S IMl- 



14,17S'lHtJ»ti*_ 



a«^ 
On. 
Ob. 
Cia. 



t»7.i1 [Amandetf] 

2. to 1 f7.Sl^ In the table In paragraph 
(a), the row beginning with *1 4000-14200 
[kHzj" is reviaed by beginnina the row 
with ■*14flOQ-14lS<J (kHi)" so that the 
entire fow reads as followa^ 



idiooa-14150.. 



F1 



3. Also ht fi 97.61, In the table in 
paragraph Ca}. the row beginning with 
"14200-14050 (kHz)" Ib revised by 
begliming the row with "14150-14350 
[kHx)** so that the eotire row readl ftf 
folic ws: 



utso-t 



AM. M. Atk^X N^ ft 



73 Magazine • July, 1983 101 



LETJEK 



E-T. FEEDBACK 



My wire and I bolh enjoyod the artrcte on 
*'How EX Really Called Home." When we 
saw the movie and Elligll and £J set the 
dommuntcator up, I said, "Thai looks like 
Sornething 3 ham would build." Looks like I 
wa$ rights 

Stephen Wfmmer WBOGGT 
Raymond NE 



[ 



THE ELiTE MODE 



] 



CMing, namely CW. Unde^ this systefn. lire 
hlQhesi ciass licensees would t>^ able to 
use the best possible means af commuhi- 
eating, up to ami including CW; wMfe 1h€ 
lower ciaflfi licensees vuould be festrlcted 
to the less elftclem methods. i,e., voba. 

What could be simpler or fairer? People 
who can1 master or have no Interest in 
mastering CW wouldn't be saddled with it 
while Ihose whio do enjoy it would have the 
added satisfaction of having the 'best/' 10 
some extent, resented tor ttiem, 

Jsms«0«ltofiN7€CC 

Tempe AZ 

Truabhmgkw — Wayne. 



The £Olutk>ri to the question of code or 
no code c^n t)e ansrwered lo the satfsfac^ 
tion of everyofie The proponents o* code 
oft&f the ability to "get through wiih CW 
when voice is unintelligible/' narrowef 
bandwidth, etc., as proof thai CW Is the 
ultimate skill Ihat everyone should have as 
their goaL The thing I doo'l understand is^ if 
CW is so damned good, why ilan't It re- 
served for the select group thai can master 
If and I ha! have the technical expertise 
necessary lopass the Advanced- arhd Ejclra- 
Class tests? 

Instead of fSsefvJho CW fof Itiosc who 
are most deservirig ot its fantastic bene- 
tits, itie CW pfO(M>ri«ffls prefer restricttng 
Tt^ctse least deserving of its bettelits to u& 
irtq ohly CW, 

It just piain seems backwafd:s, ^VHat 
needs to be done; is to restrict Novices and 
Tect!s to voice until they've earned the nght 
to u&e the far superior method of communi- 



FOR VIETNAM VETS 



] 



An open letter to all yeterar^s Ol the US 
military during the Vietnam era who are 
now amateyr radio operators: 

We are trying to form a net ol radio 
operators ^or each slate to participate in 
commuhicanon with each other and with 
the nonprofit organization. Vietnam Veter- 
ans oi Anwftca, Our objective is to reach all 
ttie vets of that era and tiiand together tor 
itie purpose of t>rolherhood, bwvetits. and 
discussfon ot the ejects ot chemical war> 
tare on us. 

We will &B putijishmg a newsletter and 
participatinf in ttvt First Annual Coriven- 
tior* i04 the Vets of the Ba, m Washir>gion, 
DC. Ofl November 7- lO. Iff yoti are interested 
m participating, com act Mike Ket^y. 21431 
Crescent Avenue, Eau Claire Wt 5470 1. 



rMULTI-BAND SLOPERS 

160, 80, and 40 meters 

Outstanding DX performance of slope rs is well known. Now you Cfln en- 
-ioy 2 Of 3band BIG'StGNAL reportsi Automatic bandswilching * Very 
low SWR'CoaE teed*Zkw power * Compncl < Ground or tower teed 
- Hang from any support 25 ft. high or higher . Easy to install - Ve r y 
tow profile * COiVtpJele instructions * ImmedJSt© shipment -Checli ok 

3 BAND SLOPER tSO &0 & 40Meters 60jt long $ J3 oo Trt ppcf 




2 SAND SLOPER SO & 40fVieters 41 II. long 



S 30.00 ui ppd 



3-BANDNOT^aP PtPOtE 160 SO & 40M- n3it. tpHQ ^ 66 ^ IM ppd 
2-aANDNOTRAP DtPOLE 80.4 4QM - B4tt long S 4S <X> IH PQti 



FOR ADDN L INFO on thes-e and other unique an renins' 



£«n^ SASE 



W9tNN ANTENNAS 
BOX 393-S MX PROSPECT IL 600S6 



(7^5ye34A7^^. or Larry Mrttman (^9AUG, 
Bosc 158. fit 5. Eau Ctaire Wl 54701, 
1715>^74*471, 

Vietnam Veterans of America rs a tw^ 
profit combat veterans organ izatK>n cafth 
fied by ttw Cor^r^ss of the United Stales. 

Mike Kt^ty 
EauCliireWI 



GUEST SPEAKER 



] 



You mentioned in the Decembern 1982, 
issue the woeful jack of good speakers a I 
hamfests. I would like to offer my services 
to any interested hamfest/radio club. I am 
the Kentucky state coordlnatOJ" for the Ra- 
dio Amateur Saleltite Corporation (AMSAT), 
ar>d i have tieen active in amateur satellite 
communication for live years, I have a set 
of slides ar^d I have a simple non-technicaJ 
program whtch will exptain ttie past, pres^ 
ent, arKl future of amateur space activrty. t 
also served a siint as technieai editor ot fX 
arnt I can talk at>out what it's like to wofl4 for 
the tkest magai£ine in amateur radio, tf your 
club has any aspmng authors, t can tetl you 
what makes an afticle worth buyirLg, 

I will travel anywhere there ts a ham test 
or club meetlTTij. The only fee thai I require 
Is my travel expenses, t have access 10 a 
private plane so I can go anywhere in the 
eastern USA. 



Cliaries E. Maftin AB4Y 

SoK 3370 

eowllng Greefi KY 42101 



BEACON UPDATE 



Here is an update on lenHmeter beacofw 
for the readers of 73, The KAiYE/B t>eacoin 
in soutneastem Connecticut has t>eefi 
Joined by at least two others in the US They 
ar?! W At lOQ^B tn the Boston area on ZE 208 
MHz. and WSVD^B in Laurel. Maryland, on 
20.295 MH2. 1 haven^t heard the lOB beacon 
here, but W3VD^B can be heafd on back- 
scatter. 

Reception ol the KAIYE and WA1I0B 
beacons has been reported in Great Britain 
in PfacticBt Wire(es$ magazine. In the May, 
19B3. issue them is a listing ot 19 beacons 
woribwide with a graph displaying dates of 
reception in the UK, The beacons are troin 
all coniinents. with VE2TEN t>eing Iheohly 
other Horth An^ncsn t>eacon listed 

A listing of active beacons is hemg main- 
tained by Willi HB9AVE_ I have sent him the 
informal ion on my beacon, anid he would 
appreciate mfofmatlori from ottver inoivtou- 
3ts arid groups operating len-meter bea- 
cons. There is a limited amount of space 



in 



It fc.'JM'-l' 



: c»m • 



Radio equipmeni 
not included 



^Bl Also Available 

^^Ftoor Space; St" Wide Dy 30" Deep 

^ S1 90.50 

A3BA KEYSTOrJE AVENUE 



... at last . . . 
your shack organized! 

A beautiful piece of f umtture — your XYL will love it! 

$184.50 &F RADIO DESK 

Deluxe • Ready to Assemble 

Designed with angl«d rear st^e^f for your 
viewing comfort and ease of operation. 

FINISHES: Walnut or Teak Stain. 

Floor Sp*c«: W Wld« by 30"^ E>««p 

Additional tnfonnation on Fte<|uesi 

Checks. Money Orders, BanlcAjnencard 
and Masler Charge Accepted. 

F.O.B. Culver Ciiy. (In Caiit Add £% Sa^e&Tax,} 
DEALER lIStOUIRIES SNVITED - 



►^65 



ST Aiiwilevf Rcirf lo /brrKe/ 

CULVER CITY, CALIF. 90230 — PHONE (2131 83? 4670 



allocated for unattended operation of 
beacons on ten meters tiere in the US, so 
some prior lisieninf; and coordrnation is 
highly reoommended before putting on a 
beacon. Tt>is also hol<ls lor other bartds^ 

1 am wiliin^ to act ae a cieannQhouse tor 
US beacons, toapihg a file on sctivilies and 
otNer infoimaticn. It artyone is planning to 
put a beacon Qt\ ten, or ltj>ows ol afiy otJri>er 
twacon^ active or planned, t would appreci- 
ate hearing atjout ihem. Please drop me a 
line. Thanks very much. 

W, Keith Hibtiert KA1YE 
25 Hillcrest Road 
Nlantic CT 063&7 



BEST MAG 



Yoijr editorial arid lectin icai construction 
material is the best, I lust renewed tor hiro 
rrxjre years* 

Ruu Tower Kl 00 W 
Arcadia FL 



A DREAM COME TRUE 



On March 30, 1383, 1 walked into the FCG 
field office at SyracuBe, New York, with a 
Technician-cEass licenBe. I walked out with 
a Genera I -cla as Interim permit. That permit 
is a dream come Irue and it has t^en a 
27 year wait. 

The reasons why I passed the code test 
were that i studied the cotJe each day and I 
used your "Back Breaker" tCTr3l3) code 
tape. After two prev^oiis la^tures c^ ttie code 
test, i <ieci<led to use your tape. So, ttiank 
you very much for tt>e hielp. Please keep up 
the good work ai 73. 

tBe no^ode licer^rtg: t'm dead against 
rtj 

Ban AJebasto wA2PXf« 
Frankfod NY 

Rtghton there, Ben. fl you and I have to suA 
fer, Wsn wrtys^Oi/W/) f everyone ?^nd thmk 
Of We mon&y I 'f{ fo$& it they pa$s a no-code 
fic&nse antf my code tapes stop ^eiiing. 
Th&t 13-psr tape is a rough one. . . i made 
that a f most impossible so thai you'd have 
dear self ing once you mastefed it.— Wayne. 



MODEM MAGIC 



^^ 



You're always interested Jh new techn*- 
caJ Meaa, so twe's of>e you cart think 
about How about using our standard com- 
pute nvxlems over the air and stanOanfiz^ 
Ing on these shift frequefucies foe com- 
pijter-tc>cofnputer communications? 

A modem for the VIC 20 Is about St 00, 
while commercial RTTY rriodems start at 
$150. The phone^1lne{Be]l 103) modems use 
frequencies of tO7Oil270 and 2025/2225 Hz, 
We oouid standardize on the lower two fre- 
quencies, since they^re easily passed by 
receivers and Iransmitlers, and the 200- Hz 
shift is within the FCC limits, 

Tlie only diHlculty is thai we'd have to 
shift the nxKlems from the QFIiGlt^AT^ po- 
sition during tran&mit to the ANSWER posi- 
tion during receive A relay coukl 6o this, 
avid it saams to be a small price to pay to 
get one rriocfem to larve 4cnj^tite duty. 

Anyone interested tn Qiving it a try? 

Jonatttan A. Titus KA40VK 
eiacksbur^ VA 

Hey* Do W and ^rite an att^cie^ And you peo- 
pfe m Nashua NK you write one, too!— 
Wayne, 



102 73 Magazine • July, 1983 



CIRCUITS 



COMMON SIDE 
OF SWITCHES 

msuLATimd wwm 



Hlf SWlTCtl 



Do you have a technique, modtflcBtion, or easy-todupffc^te ctr- 
cult that your fetiow r&aders might be interested in? tf so, send us a 
concise description of it (under two pages ^ double-spaced) and in- 
clude a clear diagram or schematic If needed. 

In exchange for these tecfynicaf gems, 73 offers you the choice of 
a book from the Radfo Bookshop, to be sent upon publication^ Sub- 
mit youf idea (and book choice) to: Circuits, Editorial Offices, 73 
Magazine, Peterborough NH 03458. Submissions not selected for 
pubiication will be returned if an SASE is enclosed. 




mm 



i 



CftrST*!. 



Fig. 1. Side view 



^i KM SOCKET} 



PLyG 




COWHtOlSf OF 
SWITCHES 



COMHON iEAD 

«>E5 10 HOLE. tHAT 

C4TMOI3e Qr D« 

iHffcs m 




CtODE LEA05 3ClDef*ED 
TO PACK OQW OF PlhS 



9 VOLT 

BATTERY 

CO(VNECT0R 



RADIO 3HACK 

9VDC BATTERIf 
CLIMINATOR 



MEf^ORY BACKUP FOR THE 
ICOM25A: To retain the memory 
in the fcom 25A when the power 
is disconnected, slip back the 
cover of the power plug and wire 
a 9-V battery connector to the 
white (positive) and black (nega- 
tive) leads. When removing the 



rig from its power source, snap 
on a 9-V transistor battery or 
connect it to a plug-in transform' 
ef— Paul Van Bolhuis W4ZBD. 
Bradenton FL 



Fig. 2. End view (parts omitted for clarity). 

SWITCH^ELECTABLE TONES FOR THE KENWOOD 7950/7930: 
The TU-79 tone unit for the Kenwood 7950/7930 provides for the se- 
lection of 3 preprogrammed tones from the keyboard. With the fol- 
lowing modification, the third frequency may be programmed by set- 
ting a DIP switch rather than cutting or soldering diodes^ First, pro- 
gram the tones for F1 and F2 and verify that they worii. Unsolder the 
cathode leads of the diodes in row F3 and position them as shown in 
the diagrams. Then mount a piece of stiff insulating foam over the 
diodes In rows Ft and F2, securing it firmly in place. Orient a&or 
7-position rocker-type DIP switch so that the pole numbers align 
with the diode numbers 7 through Bon the PC board. Solder a com- 
mon wire to all of the leads on one side of the switch as shown in Fig. 
T. Solder diode leads 7 through 6 to the corresponding switch pins; 
solder the common wire to the hole which previously held the cath- 
ode wire from D$. Be careful when making the modification; on my 
instruction sheet, diodes 01 through 06 were shov^n in reverse or- 
der, but the markings on the PC board were correct,— Clmi WiiJiams 
KBSSY, Portage Ml. 



WACHmE SCR^W^ 



illCflO<P«<HlE 
CLIP 




EASY COAX CONNECTIONS: f^uch time and effort can be saved when working with large-diameter coax 
such as RG-8/U by using a small, inexpensive tubing cutter to help with the stripping. These cutters can 
be obtained at most local hardware stores and are listed as %- to %-inch copper tubing cutters. Use the 
cutter to score the jacket of the coax and then simply peel off the iacket. This eliminates the nicked and 
damaged braid that often accompanies coax work. When the jacket has been removed and the braid ex- 
posed, use a soldering gun or high-wattage iron to quickly tin the braid in place. Now, use the tubing cut- 
ler to cut through the rigid braid just as if it were tubing. Cut deep enough to remove the braid but do not 
damage the inner insulation. The inner insulation can also be cut with the tubing cutter but I find it easier 
just to use a knife at this point. The resulting job is very neat, virtually guarantees no nicks, and makes it 
very easy to attach a PL'259 connector since the braid is already tinned. — Craig Crichton K7UKW, The 
Dalles OR, 

ns 



AJD10 
INPUT 



RUBflER FtJOT 
fEPOXY IN PLACE J 



5/iar V/£W 

MICROPHONE HOLDER FOR 
MOBILE RIGS: Keep your oper- 
ating area organized and neat 
when you are using a mobile rig 
as a base station. This holder 
witf keep your microphone with- 
in easy reach yet out of the way, 
and the parts for it can be found 
in almost any junk box.— Thorn- 
35 Hart AD1B, Westwood MA. 




uicnoi^HChit 

INJ^UT 



/t7 



^CASSETTE 



IK 



CI 







#IEI*OTE 

mmtT 



ICI SK^fiSa QA LM390a Of HMt* 
tCZ S1C4049 WVERTIWG HlJt gt^FFEA 



RELAY QPPT ^S?79'flS 



AUTOMA TiC TAPE RECORDING: Don 7 miss the action while you 're away from the rig. This circuit turns 
on a tape recorder whenever the receiver's squelch Is broken. After signal loss, the recorder will shut off 
following a slight delay.— Gary Anderson KE7H, Nampa ID. 

73 Magazine • July, 1983 103 



CONTESTS 



Robert Baker WB2GFE 
15 Windsor Dr. 
Atco NJ 08004 

VENEZUELAN WORLDWIDE 
CONTEST 

SSB— Starts: 0000 GMT July 2 
Ends: 2400 GMT July 3 

CW— Starts! 0000 GMT July 30 
Ends 2400 GMT July 31 

The Radio Ctub of Venezyefa inviies »l\ 
amateurs \o patlcip^te In the 21st year of 
Iha Venezuelan Independence Worldwide 
Ckintest.. Use all bands. 80 throufjh 10 
meters. Operating classes include: single 
operator, on© band (for each band); single 
operator, mu3ti-band; muUi-operaipr, mu Hi- 
band, one Iransmitlen ^d multlHpperator, 
muHi-band^ muMHransfnittef. 

EXCHANGE: 

RS^ ptus a three-digit OSO numtier 
stalling with 001. 

SCORfNG: 

Contacts betwQH^n stations of different 
countries count two points. Contacts wiih 
stations within one^'s own cojniry do not 
count but are vaild as multipliers lor each 
band. Count dn^ multiplier for each Ver?e- 
;uelan and USA call area and ench country 
(mc^uding own) worfced <m each tMnd. Use 
the ARHL DXCC coiititry list, Rnal score <s 
Iha Lotal DSO potnts tirrves the total 
mulfiplief poifilfl. 

AWARt^ 

For Stations outside Venezuela there will 
be a plaque presented to the highest scorer 
in each class. Medals go to the highest 
fii^orer In each continent and among the 
Bolivarlan countries (Bolivia, Columbia, 
Ecuador, Panama, and Peru) in the sing le- 



operator, multi-band class. Certificates to 
all stations m the Americas working 15 YV 
Stat lo ns and 1 d1 f f erant c ou n t rl e s. a 1 1 E ur o- 
pean and African stations working 10 YV 
stations and 10 different countries, and ail 
Asia and Oceania stations working 5 YV 
stalions and 10 different count ries. 

Logs must show date and lime in GMT. 
stalion worked, reports exc hanged and 
reS[>ecttv^ numerical order, mul tippers, and 
points. Use different sheets for each band 
worked. Include a separate summary sheet 
showing name(s} of operator(sl call sign, 
and address. Each participant must in- 
clude S2.00 US or IRC equtvaient with the I r 
logs. Entries must be postmarked no later 
ttian August 15 for SSB and September 15 
for CW and should be addressed to: RCV« 
PO Box 22d5, Caracas 1010- A. Venezuela. 

INTERNATIONAL WORLDWIDE 
DX SSTV CONTEST 

Starts: 0000 GMT July 15 
Ends: 2400 GMT July 17 

This Is the third annual DX SSTV contest 
sponsored by A5 Magazine. U is a 48-hckir 
SSTV video contest using 80 thourgh 10 
melera withJn the recommended SSTV caW- 
jng/^operaling frequencies listed beiow. Ta 
encourage all band contest usage and pfO- 
motionp extra ixfnus poinl£ are granted on 
Ibe 10^^ IJ-. 40-. and SO^mati^ fe^and sieg- 
ments. Single- and multi^op^rator stations 
are recofintied with cro^^band contacts 
not pemiltted^ Indlvidyal contacts eounl 
only once pef band with rep^libve mulll- 
^nd contacts acceptable. 

Barring any unforeseen changes from 
last year's rules, call$igns and video 
reports must be In ''video'' form, Mugshots 
of the station operator, lamily, or friends 
can couni Only once. Slower clock-rate 



Jul 2-3 


UENMR 

Venezuelan Worldwide Contest— SSB 


Jul S-10 


lAI^U R«diospori Championslitp 


Jul 15-17 


A 5 M^gsiin e SSTV OX C onlesl 


Jul 23-24 


Brothers and SEsiera QSQ Party 


Jul 30-31 


Venezuelan Worldwide Contest— CW 


Jul 30-Aug 1 


Armadllle Run 


Jul ^0-Aug 1 


CW County- Hunler^i Contest 


Aug 6-7 


ARRLUHF Contest 


Aug ia-21 


45 Mmgazine UHF FSTV DX Contest 


Aug 20-21 


SARTG Woddwide RTTY Contest 


Aug 27-28 


Occupation Conte&t 


&«p 3 


DAftC Corona lO-Matei fiTTY ContMt 


J^ Smp 9-11 


Oonnacticul Oystar Fe»ttiral '^ ^ 


"Sep ttm 


ARRLVKF OSO Party 


Smp 10-11 


Cray Valley Badio Society SWL Contest 


S«p 17-19 


Waahlngion State OSO Part^ 


0(tt1-3 


Oragon OSO Party 


Odt i-s 


AftHL QSO Part¥-CW 


Oct 9-10 


AflRL QSO Parly-Phone 


Oct i5-ie 


AftRL Slmulaled Emergency Test 


Oct 22-2Z 


MF Runde SW Activity Weekend 


Oct n-n 


Clara Ac-Oc Conteal 


Nov &-6 


ARRL Sweepstakes^CW 


Hov® 


DARC Corona taMetir RTTY Conteal 


Nov ig-20 


ARHL Sweepstelces— Phono 


Dec 3-4 


ARRL160W«ler Contest 


D#c ID-it 


ARRL 10-Wet»r Contesi 



speeds are encouraged in eiltier 12&16.5- or 
2S6I31 -second time bases Colof wortt must 
contain a minimum oi a ^-cofor o^iertay to 
qualify with standafd RQ& frame transmis- 
sions, fii^otion SSTV must have a minimum 
oi 2 frames sent with autofnalic receive 
switching circuitry or manually opefated 
switching by the receiving operator and 
64 )< 64 'quadrant" storage of no less than 
4 separate pictures with replays. 

SCORiNG: 

Each SSTV two-way contact is wonh S 
points within the same country. 10 points 
lor OX out ol country Contact tionus points 
are available as follows Mugshots^l 
point, stow speed— 2 points, quad trame— 
3 points, motwn SSTV— 4 pomis. tiigh 
resolution— 5 points, and color SSTV 
(RGB)— 10 points. A band multiplier of 3 
can be claimed for contacts on 40 and 80 
meters. 2 for contacts on 6, 10. and 15 
meters. Stations with over 25 DX countries 
worked add 26 points, over 50 OX countries 
add 50 polrits, over t(30 countries add 100 
points! 



fREQUENCiBS: 

Advanc«d^xira— 3845, 7220. 14230, 
21340,28680,50150. 

General — 3990, 7290, 14340, 21440. 

2ai8a, 50jm 

AWARDS.' 

First-place winner receives a 3-year sub- 
scription {worth $60} to A5 ATV Magazffi& 
with front-cover picture plus a gold cer- 
tificate. Second- and thirii-place winners 
receive one-year subs^iriptions and gold 
certificates. Atl entries regardless ol score 
receive goid certificates suitable for fram^ 
tng. Riesu^ts will be in the Novemtmr issue 
of A5 ATV Magaitne 

ENTRIES: 

Submission ot Fogs and totaled scoresr 
fnust be post marked no later than August 1 
and submitted to: Contest Manager, A 5 
ATV Magazine, PC BOK H. Lowdan lA 
52255-0408. Logs will be returned ft* will 
any photos, etc. Some log sheets and DX 
country lists are availabte from WBQOCO. 



RESULTS 



VERMONT QSO PARTY — 1983 



state 


Call 


Award 


Score 


Name 


County/ 
l>fovlnca 


AR 


WBSRYe 




ae 


Johnson^ B. 




A2 


AK7J 




B 


Eliason, C 




CA 


N6CPQ 




1 


Kitchens, J, 




FL 


K4DD0 




00 


Harp, R. 




FL 


N4FBY 




40 


Mach, T. 




IL 


W9QWM 




4 


Schroch. H 




IN 


W9XD 




S 


Drudge. O 




KS 


NBCLV 




10 


Gregory, B, 




LA 


W5WG 




05 


Owen.W. 




MA 


KAVHFN 




% 


Harris, O 




MA 


K1BA 




24 


Bacon, A 




MD 


WA3EOP 




2* 


Pyne. W 




MD 


W3QYL 




4 


Freidmann. D 




MO 


WeilSET 




45 


Hawley, P. 




MS 


WSUCY 




43 


Croysdale, L 




NH 


WiOC 




120 


Littlefield. N. 
(multi-op) 




NH 


AF1T 




35 


Clement, D. 




NJ 


N2CJJ 




32 


I^ngston. R 




NJ 


WA2AS0 




4 


Hauslehen. P. 




NM 


KSSDO 




1 


Ri^dley, 




NY 


WB2TK0 




40 


Harodecki. M. 




NY 


N2BF6 




20 


Moseson, R. 




OK 


NSAfV 




£0 


MattJS, A. 




Oft 


VV06EAW 




B 


Hamilton, T. 




PA 


KA30SW 




2 


RiegeK K. 




PA 


WA3JXW 




2 


Ctirlsttan, 0. 




SO 


Kcezu 




55 


Kleinsasser^ G. 




TN 


K04PP 




B 


Chad in, 0, 




TX 


W5PWG 




fiO 


Short, D. 




TX 


WA5DTK 




36 


Brewer. J. 




VA 


N4GTU 




24 


Frankiand. 8^ 




VA 


KF4LY 




a 


Treadwell B. 




VT 


W1A1M 




32460 


Tayior. 6, 


Washington 


VT 


WAtKPJ 


• w 


2&172 


Vanat, J, 


LamoJite 


VT 


NiSflT 


* * * 


2672? 


VVoo<Sworth. F 


Washington 


VT 


W20MC/1 


t 


24©5e 


CryEtal ARC 
fmufli^p) 


Wmdham 


VT 


K1HKI 




24000 


Deforge, R. 


Orange 


VT 


KK1U 




S134 


Nevin. D. 


Washington 


VI 


Wlf*OB 




Tm 


ftea<l. B, 


Windsor 


VT 


WA1GYS 




120 


Merrick, K. 


Orange 


WA 


KN7L 


* 


33 


Parker, C. 




WY 


WB7EMA 


M 


2B 


Culver, A. 




WY 


KC7QE 




IS 


Sutherland, W. 




LU 


UU5AMF 


A 


4 


Anselmi, H, 




Legond: 










« ^ 


1st kn state/county 








* ■ _ 


2nd \f\ state 










* * « _ 


3nl in ttate 










« = 


1st muUi-op(VTofily) 









104 73M&gazme • July, 1983 



BROTHERS AND SISTERS 
QSO PARTY 

The Central Oregon Ratlio Amateurs 
{CORAi are sponsoring the conlesi that will 
run from 0600 PST Saturday, July 23, until 
1200 PST Sunday, Ju3y 2C Operations will 
b© from WN700D in Brothars, Dfegon, and 
N7CSH In Sisters, Dragon, Ptione fraquan- 
ciea will b^ 10 kHz up from the bottom por- 
tion of in& General bands. CW wiU be 15 
kHz up (rom lh& bottom portion ol tha 
Novice bands. QSL via CORA, PO Sox 722, 
Ben^ OR 97?0§. Enclose a Oustness-sEze 
SASE for ret urn QSL card«. 



CW COUNTY-HUNTER^S 
CONTEST 

Starts: OOOO GMT July 30 
Ends: 0200 GMT August 1 

Tha CW Coumy-Hunier's Net Invitefi all 
amateurs to particJpata in thts yaar'a oon* 
test. All mobile and portable operation In 
less ^active counties in welcomed and en> 
eemrtig^^ Stations may be worked once per 
band and again rf ttie station has ctianged 
ooiintieG. Portal^le or motile stations crtang- 
mg counties durfrtg ttie contest may repeat 
ooritacis for OSO points. 

EXCHANGE: 

QSO number; category (P for porlabJie. M 

for mo^Ne); flST; state, province, Of country; 
and US county. Stations on county lines 
give and receive only one QSO number, but 
each county i& vaJid for a muhipller. 

FBEQUENCitS: 

3575, 7056, 14065. 2t0e5, and 2B066. ft fa 
strongty requested that only P- or M-cate 
gory stations caK CO Of QRZ on 40 meters 
below 7066 and on 50 meters t>elow 140^. 
with alt other stations spreadtng out above 



SCOfilNO: 

QSOs witli fixed stations are t popnt^ 
QSO s w4 1 h port able or mobi la at a t ion s are 3 
pOinN. MuUfpEy the number of OSO points 
times tha number of US counties worked. 
Moblies and portables calculate their score 
on trie basis of total contacts M'Jthin a state 
lor (tie state cartificate. and on all opera- 
tion it theyr operated from more than one 
state in c^mpettlion for the High PortatNe 
or MisQii Mobile Trop*»y, 



THE ARC LITE 

NEWSLETTER OF THE MONTH 

To create a good club newsletter, you don't liave to have fancy graphics, 
typeset teMt, or profeasEcnal writers— Just a desire to Inform and entertain your 
readers and a willingness to work at it. The Arc Ute, newsletter of the Garland 
Amateur Radio Club in Garland^ Texas. Is a perfect example of what c en be done 
with simpte resources and a little elbow grease. 

TheArc LiW is neither typeset nor printed, but the first impression you get Is 
that it is very clean. Obvious care has been taken in its iayout. making the most 
advantageous use of white space without creating an empty look. Each page is 
bordered with a black li;ne,an4d stories of special note— such as a recent issue's 
news flash of the expantfed 2CMneter phone band— are tx>3ted>, giving the 
newsletter the ambience of a tabloict newspaper. 

Eact^ section has tieen painstakingly labeFed with a hand^me headline and 
when a story fumps from one page to another, you are lotd where it has been 
continued. 

Od^dly enough, The Arc L/fe's con lent s are not that variant from the offerings 
of most other newsletters. Minutes of the last meeting, club news, and informa- 
tion on the club's repeater and station are ell standard fare. But there Is a dif- 
ference. The sentences are complete. Misspellings are rare. For newsletter 
editor Gary Enaieman K5HGL, the world of grammar and syntax Es obviously not 
uncharted territory. 

In his editoriaL "de^ Editor," Qary notes that he Is selllr^g advertising to help 
support the new Arc Lite format which he created. Gary has obviously seen a 
need tor improvement and engineered a way to make the new idea work. 

(f your cfub takes pride in its newstetter, 73 wants lo see it. To enter In TTs 
contest, send a copy of the newsletter to ^. Pine Street, Peterborough NH 
0345S, Ann: News letter of the Month. 



AWARDS: 

Certificates will be awarded In three 
categories: 

t) Highest fixed or fixed portable station in 
each state^ province^ and country^ with 
1,000 or more points. 

2} Highest station in eaeh state operating 
portabie from a county which is not his nor- 
mal potnt of Qfieraiion, with I^OQO or mora 
points. 

3} Highesi statkHi in each state operating 
mobile from 3 or more counties, wji h a minl< 
mum of 10 Q€Os in each of at Ieas4 3 covn- 
lies. 

Plaques wHI be awarded to the highesi 
mobtie and portable stations in the USA 
who meet the above requirements tar certif- 
icates. Additional awards will be issued 
where deemed appropriate. 

ENTRiES: 

Logs musi show category, datenirr^e in 
GMT, station worked, band, exchanges. 
OSO points, location, and claimed score 



All entries with 100 or more QSOs must in- 
clude a check sheet of coumies worked or 
be disqualiiied from feceivlng awards. En- 
close a large SASE if results are desired. 
Logs must be postmarked by September 3 
and sent to: CW County-Hunter's Net. c/o 
Jerry Burkhead N6QA, 75Z5 Oaltic St,. San 
Diego C A 921 tl. 



ARMADILLO RUN 

Starts: 0001 GMT July 30 
End$: 0200 GMT August 1 

The Texas DX Society announces Its con. 
test to assist CW operators in gaining USA< 
CA All Counties Award status. The TDXS 
wi 1 1 act I vat e al i Texas co unt I es by d i s patch- 
ing mobile stations from Houston and acti- 
vating ihese stations during the County- 
Hunter's CW Contest. Several fixed 
stations will also be activated. To ensure 
that the largest number of entrants receive 
equal oppon unify to work iha mobile sta- 



lions, operatlrvg wf II ger^eralf y be resirrcte^} 
lo30rTloldr«. 

Entry class for tt^ Armadllfo Run la 
single operator from out of Texas only. Op< 
eraiofi must operate ftt»m tt^r own sia^^ 
IkMi. Motrite operation will gerterally b6 re^ 
sthcted to 14055^14075 MHz. Operation on 
other bands will be in accordance with tha 
County-Hunter's CW Contest rules. During 
tha contests call CQ TDXS on 14050, 7065, 
or 3565 and a control station (WBDOZ, 
K5HA/2, NGHUP) will answer your call and 
try to answer questions, Information re- 
ganging which station will activate specHic 
countJ'es may be received by writing or call- 
ing KZ5M tsetween 6:30 and B:0O pm COST 
at I? 13^343-1 060. 

EXCHANGE- 

So as not to distract from (he County- 
Hunter's CW Contest, use the same ex- 
change as that required by that contest; 
QSO number; category {P- portable. M- 
mobMe); RST; state, province^ or country; 
and county for USA stations. 

SCOmNG: 

The confer score will be e<iual to the 
total numl>er of Texas counties contacted 
dunng th« contest period. Ties will be 
broken by ttie Texas OSO coyr>L 

AWARDS: 

A unique plaque will be awarded to the 
station operator contacting the most Texas 
counties during the contest period. The 
plaque winner will be flown to Houston for 
the 1SS3 AFIRL National Convention to 
receive the award if he contacted over 17S 
Texas counties. Certificates witi be award- 
ed to entrants contacting ai least 50 coun- 
t^s. Endorsements will b& issued for the 
foMowing county levels: lOO, ^5C, 175, 200. 
22&« arui 250, as v^t as Atl Texas Counties. 

ENTRtES: 

To quaJify for award consideration, tog 
Information containing Texas stations 
worked, time |GMTi, band, and the county 
the station was operating from shall be 
sent to: the Armadillo Run Chairman, Den- 
nia Motschenbacher KZ5M, PO Box 82, 
Thompsons TX 77481. Mailing deadline is 
August 3T, 1983. Entrants may forward 
OSLs lo the above address for Texas QSOs 
made during the contest period. The TDXS 
will make special efforts lo ensure that 
OSLs recelfved are answered! 



I 



AWARDS 



BiftGosrtey KE7C 
Micro-W, fnc. 
2665 North Busby Road 
Oak Harbor WA 98277 

JORDANIAN AWARDS 

Th« Arabian Kntghls Awirdi 

This award Is issued by the Arab Radio 
Amateur League {ARAL) members and 
presented by Hfs Majesty King Hussein 
(JY1I of Jordan. 

To qualify for this recognition of 
achievement, amateurs must have prooF 
of having contacted at least ten Arab 
countries, and or^ contact must be wHh 
elttiei- «JY1 Of JV2. All contacts must be 
made on or after January %, ^971, on any 
authoflzed mode of communications, 
ThM* artt no ipe6is\ endorsements. 



To apply for the Arabian Knights Award, 
ttie applicant must prepare a list of 
claimed contacts tn preftit order. Each en- 
try must ai^so include the date and time in 
GMT, the bar>d and mo<te of operaiton, 
and the station worked. 

Oo not send OSL card$. as photocopies 
will be accepted. As an alternative, you 
may have your list verified by two local 
amateufS, a local radio ciub secretary, or 
a notary public. 

Enclose this Hat along with an award 
fee of ten IRCs and send to the attention 
of: JV1 Award Manage?, PO Box 1055, Arrw 
man, Jordan. 

The Royal Jordanian Awanfe 

To amateurs throughout the world wtKJ 
qualify, JVt, His Majesty King Hussein I of 
Jordan, will ^ssue a very elegant award of 



a£4)levement to recognize one of two lev- 
els of accomplishment. 

First, the Silver Award is offered in rec- 
ognition of having worked sIk different JY 
prefixes. There are no band or mode re- 
strictions; however, all contacts must be 
on Of after January T, 1971, to Count. 

The second and probably the toughest 
award of all to obtain is the Coral Award, 
which is issued to amateurs who visit Jor- 
dan and make a QSO from Aqaba. Simple, 
huh? Anyone lor a charter trip this wlnier? 

As with all awards sponsored &y our 
Jordanian friends, applicants muat pre- 
pare a list of claimed contacts made, cit- 
ing the usual logbook information includ- 
ing RSfO 

Forward this list, stating which award It 
Is you are applying tor, along with an 
award fee of ten IRCs to: J¥1 Award Man- 
ager. PO Box 1055, Amman* Jordan, 



OX AWARDS FROM ITALY 

A very good OX friend of your^ Stttd 
n^ne, John Paul 18K0B. wrote a very com- 
plimentary letter about our awards cot- 
umn and a^Ked thai we share the awards 







ARAS COUNTRIES 


JY1 


liing Husivih 


JV2 


Royal Jordanian 




Family 


A4X 


Oman 


A«X 


United Arab Emlrateis 


A7X 


Qatar 


A9X 


Bahrain 


ON 


Morof^o 


H2,7Z 


Saud) Arable 


J3 


Djit>0u!1 


JV 


Jordan 


OEK 


tabanon 


ST 


Sudan 


su 


Egypt 


YK 


Syria > 


Yl 


Iraq ' 


3va 


Tunisia 


4W 


Yemen 


SA 


Ubya 


SIS 


Mauritania 


to 


Somali 


70 


South Y«m«n 


rx 


Algeria 


9IU 


Kuwait 



73 Magazine • July, 1963 10S 



progfam sponsored by ihe Assoc razH^ne 
Radlotecmca Italians jARI|i, John Paul 
noted that Ihe following genefat rules ap- 
piy to all HF awards Issued by the Afll and 
recommendad Itiai they be read togettier 
wilh the condJtJoTiiB governing each JndS- 
vidual cerhficaie. 

All inquiries and/or a|}pii cat ions s^nou^d 
be addressed to the ARI Avirard^s MaJiaQef. 
GiampaoEoNucciOtti IBKOB. Vta FTarvcan- 
zano, 31-80127 Napoli, *taly, and include 2 
IRCs far airmail reply. 

ARI awards will be issued to any BHia- 
teur who submits a letter, dated and 
signed, with applicant's name, address, 
and cail . He must cert ity thai he has coin- 
plied wit^ all rules govermng amateur ra- 
dio in his country and rhai he has operat- 
ed with fiirplay and good sportsmanship; 
tie muat incjyde a complete list of QSLs. 
with call sign, Dale, frequency, reports, 
time, an<l type of emission (CW^ AM, SSB, 
RTTY); and he must subrnll QSLs for 
checking. QSL Hoards must be submitted 
without corrections, erasureB, or addr- 
tior>s and musl be clearly readable; in* 
dude 05 $1.00 or 10 IRCs for fo^etgn ap- 
phcanls. The Matconi Award (S free, only a 
mailing fee is charged. 

To get an awa/iJ in a specrflc cfa^s. the 
cards must sho#f the corresponding data 
in a clear tormat. Foreign appilcants may 
avoid sending QSL cards by submitting a 
checklist of the cards duly certified by an 
appointed or elected olficiaJ or a national 
amaieurradioaffiliated society or club 
The ARI Award Manager reserves the ngtit 
Id check, on fe^uest. oneor moreciaiimed 
conlscts, as m^^essary. 

Certiflcato Det Meditarrar^eo iCDM] 

The CDM [S 4's$ued to those amateurs 
who csn show confirmation of a two-way 
contact on the HF bands since June 1, 
1952, with (a) one hxed station in each of 
at least 22 ecu nines ot the list shown be- 
low, and 0} at least 50 amateyr stations 
located in peninsular Itaty— an accumu^ 
Jated total o( 72 QSLs. 

The same staiion may be worked only 
once. Two classes of COM are o^ered: 
miKed |AM, SSB, CW, RTTYj or phone only 
(AM, SSB}. The minimum reports allowed 
to quality are RS 33 and R5T 33^ 

Co u nines W&l: $p&in, Balearic Islands, 
Ceuia and Meinia^ Morocco. France. Alge- 
fia. Corsica, Sardinia. Srciiy, Lebanon, 
Egypt. Greece, Dodecanese Islands, 
Crete^ Moufit Athos* Turhey, Syria, Yugo- 
stavra, Albania. Malta. Gibraiiaf, Cyprus, 
Monaco, Tunisia, and Libya. 

Worked Alt Italian Provinces (WAIF) 

This province award Is issued ic those 
ainateurs who can show contirmaiion of a 
two-way contact on the HF hands since 
January i, i&49, wdh one fixed station in 
each of at teasi 60 provmces of the halt an 
Republic for foreigr> amateurs, or one in 
each of 75 provinces for Italian amateurs. 
The same station may be worked iwlce or 
more 1! It's in a different province each 
time (Winlmum reports acceptatile are RS 
33 and i^ST 338. Starting January t, 1978, 
Ihis award may also t>e ar>dorse<t for sin^ 
Qle band and^cr for all 95 provinces 

List of Italian provinces: Agr^gento, 
Aieasandrta, An<:dna, Aosta, Arezzo, As- 
cot i Picefio, Asll, Avellino, Ban, Bel I u no. 
Benevento, Bergamo, Bologna, Bolzano, 
Brescia, Br1r>dlsi, Cagliari, Caltanissetta, 
Cam po basso, Caserta, Catania, Cat^n- 
ZBW. Chletj, Como, Cosenza. Cremona, 
Cuneo, Enna. Perrara. Flrenie^ Foggia, 
Forti, Frosinorte, Genova. Gonzia. Grosse- 
to, Imperia, Isernia, L'AquHa, La Spezia, 
Latin a, Lecce. Uvomro. Lucca, Macerata, 
Mifitova. Massa, Matera, Messma, Mi la- 
no. Modena, Napoli, Novara. t^uoro. Oris- 
tano, Padova, Palermo, Parma, Pavia, Pe- 
rugia, Pesaro, Peacara, Placenta, Pisa, 

106 73 Magazine • July, 1983 



USTOF QUALIFYING CONTACTS FOR OGM 



Country 


Spectftc region or clly 


PfellK 


Capo Verde island 


Any 


D4C 


PortugaJ 


Lisbon 


CT1 


Madeira 1 stand 


Any 


CT3 


Morocco 


Any 


cm 


Spam 


Cad^ce 


EA7 


Ireland 


Any 


B 


Frafice 


Any 


F 


Corsica 


Any 


FC 


England 


London 


a 


England 


f^atholm Island 


OB 


England 


Wight Island 


G 


Morthern Ireland 


Any 


Gl 


Scotland 


Any 


GM 


Switzerland 


Any 


He 


Vatican 


Any 


HV 


Italy 


BcMogna 


14 


Italy 


Any 


m 


Italy 


Rome 


10 


Italy 


FondaiG, Marconi 


IY4FGM 


Italy 


Torre- Tigutiio Marconi 


IP1TTM 


Italy 


Sicily 


ITg 


Italy 


Sardinia 


isa 


Japan 


Any 


JA 


Argentina 


Buenos Ai^es 


LU-A-B-C 


Belgium 


Any 


ON 


Brazil 


Rio de Janeiro 


PY 


Swecien 


Stockholm 


SM 


Sweden 


Gotland Island 


SMI 


USSR 


Leningrad 


UAl 


Canada 


Any 


VE1 


Newfoundland 


Any 


V01 


Labrador 


Any 


V02 


Australia 


Sydney 


Via 


Bermuda 


Any 


VPS 


LtSA 


Massactiusetis 


W1 


USA 


fslew York State 


W2 


USA 


New Jersey 


W2 


USA 


Missouri 


WO 


USA 


Illinois 


W9 


India 


Any 


vu 


Gibraltar 


Any 


ZB 


Yugoslavia 


Any 


YU2 


Li&ya 


Tripoli 


5A 


Any 


Memortal Stations 


Arty 



PIstoia, Pordenone, Potenza, Ragusa, 
Ravenna. Reggio Calabria^ Resgio Emilia, 
Rieti. Roman Rovigo. Salerno, Sassari, Sa- 
vona. Siena, Siradusa, Somlrlo, Taranto. 
Teramo. Torni, Torino, Trapanl, Tmenio, 
Treviso. Triple, Udine, Vaiese, Veneii4L, 
Veri^llU Verona, Vicenza. and Viiertoo, 

Diploma Gugl^elmo Marconi (OGM) 

This award celebrates the experiments 
carried out by Marconi In var-ious parts of 
Ihe world and brings them once again to 
the aitantion ol radio amateurs. The DGM 
w^ll be awatfied to thosi^ who make con- 
tacts with the IpcaiMies in which Marconi 
once conducted his ejtpftrimcnts. To qual- 
ify, tt is necessary to torward to the ARI all 
details of your contacts and a) 40 QSLs 
chosen from the list of contacts tor D6M. 
or b] 35 QSLs chosen Irom the list plus the 
DSL from the official commemorative dta* 
tlon, II4FGM, and one from any other C. 
Marconi memorial stall on, tor a total ol 37 
QSLs. 

When regyired ii.e.^ G^London. 
14 = BotognaL Ihe Q5L& must indicate ftie 
tily Of region ot the ^ocaltty. The DGM is 
made available for AM, S5B. CW. RTTY, 
SSTV, and misted modes. There is no band 
Nmitation; however, all contacts must be 
made on or after January 1, 1973. 

QRP INTERNATIONAL 

Being somewhat of a 10-meter ORP eri^ 
thusiast, using a convftaed CB rig, I con- 
tacted Hugh Aeiker WASCNN, wtio hap- 
pens to be the Awards Custodian for the 
ORP Amaleur Radco Glub International. 
After ti:earlng everyone on the band 



claiming to run QRP or QRPp, I figured 
once and for all I would set the true defini- 
tion of these terms from one of the origi- 
nators of an organized ORP group. Not 
only did 1 gel this group's poinf of view as 
stated in their const it ulion and liy laws, 
but afso f became the recipmnt of a full 
packet of intormatior> coi^caming their 
awards program. 

It appears that this QRP fraternity, 
founded in 1961 by K6JSS. set Ihe QRP 
standard to mean 100 Watts CWiAM or 
200 Watts PEP input, As tor ORPp status, 
we find the group recognizing this power 
only In thie 5- Watt or less range. Now thfs 
is rkot to be confused with standards set 
by other QRP societies, such as the Mich- 
igan ORPp Club International, whrch also 
defines QRPp as under 5 Watts outputs yet 
QRP is much less than 100 Watta. 

As for theif awards program, it Is packed 
fu^l of incentives, as you'll witness by 
reading on. 

The main objecttve of the QRP ARC In* 
lernalionaJ Awards Program is lo demon- 
strate the use of limited power which 
creates less QRM on the amateur bands, 
while still allowing us to enioy tne useful- 
nest of the hobby. The club issues the 
following awards which are available to 
any amateur meeting 1 he requirements as 
set forth for each below. 



ORPtS 

This award is issued lo any amateuf 
working at leasi 25 members of the QRP 
ARC IntarnationaL Endorsements are 
issued for 50, 100, 200, and every addi- 



lionat rncrennent of 100 To apply, send 
copies of logDook data. li.OO or 5 IRCs. 
and a Signed statement that you limited 
your power to 100 Watts Input ^200 Watts 
PEP SSQ). Vour list Should also Include 
the membership numtiers of each station 
worked. There are no restrictions on t^nd 
or mode recognition. 

WAC'ORP 

Tfiis award is issued to any amateur for 
confirmed contacts with tow-powet^ sta- 
tions m all siM cominents. Power inputs 
again must be carefully adhered to and a 
statement must be made certifying the 
power was within rules governing the pro- 
gram. Keep in mind also that both your 
own station and the station you are con- 
tacting must t)e using QftP to duality Voyr 
QSL cards received must state the sta- 
tion's powef used Fee is ft. 00 or 5 IRCs 

WAS-QRP 

This WAS award is issued to any 
amateur using ORP power who contacts 
atalions, one In each of the 50 US slales, 
who are aJ^o using QRP power or less 
Award fee is STOO or 5 tRCs, GCR api»ly, 

DXCC'ORP 

Til is DX award Is issued to any amateur 
who utilizes QRP power and contacts tOO 
different countries, each of which must 
also be using low power as must be stated 
on their QSL card. To apply, send log data 
and £1.00 or & IRCs. GCR apply. 

KMW 1000 Mile Per Wall Award 

Thte aiward ts tssued lo any amateur 
Iransmrttmg from or receiving the trans^ 
missions of a low-power station, such that 
the Great Circle bearings between both 
sides divided by the power input ol the 
tow-povver station equals or exceeds 1000 
mites per Wall. Contused? Ah. it's not all 
Ihat bad! Spec la I endorsements are given 
for single-band or mode achievements. To 
apply, send copies of iviU tog data in- 
cluding power used on both sides, signal 
reports exchanged, band and mode, and 
Specific location of QTH on both sides. In- 
clude $1.00 or 5 IRCs. GCR apply, 

DXCC-ORPp 

Issued lo any amaleur lor contlrmed 
contacts wHh stations in 100 DX coun- 
trires: power levels of 5 Watts or less must 
be used by the applicant. Readinn the 
rules ctoseiy, I find no power festrfciion 
on the stations you must work. To apply« 
send logbook data, including power used 
and type of equipment used. Enclose 
$1.00 or 5 IRCs GCfl apply. 

WAS-OI^Pp 

Issued lo any amateur for confirmed 
contai^rrs with each ol Ihe SO US states 
while operating 5 Watts maximum output. 
To appty, forward all pertinent log data 
end S1 ,00 or 5 1 RCs to the Award Manager. 
GRC apply. Application for the award may 
be made when the first 10 states have 
been worked, with further recognition at 
the 20, 30, 40, and, finally, 50 levels 

As with all awards offered by tne QRP 
ARC hiternationaL in order nol to delay 
processing of your award, please furnish 
not only Ihe data, but also the power 
! e ve is u sed f c r each a w a rd a nd the i y pe of 
equipment used. 

All award applications should be sent 
to: Hugh Aeiker WAfiCNN, 5 Keiffer Drtve, 
St. Albans WV 25177. 

■ # ■ * ^ 

My special thanks go out to Ade 
W9RSP/KeEEG, QRP editor for CQ 
Magazine ^ who recently provided me with 
Ihe latest up-to-date Information concern- 



mg scmie ^ery pop^far awards b€iii^ ol- 
Fer#(i by amat&ur fratemihes. 

DXCC-ORPp 

Tfiis award, ^nitrated in t97t by ttte 
Mtfiiwatt: Nafionaf jQurn^t ot QRPp, oT- 
fere a very d^stlnctNe challenge to dedi- 
cated QRPp stations the woftd over. 

The award requires contacts wilh OX 
stations m ICPO di^tereni countries of the 
world witfi the aid of list- or net-type 
operaiions Itm rules clearly state thai 
po wef m II St be h m i ted to f I ve Watts or less 
Output. To apply, the applicant must sub- 
mit a lo$ in alphabetical order of callsign 
pieUm, of Ihe atatiori worked, indlcaling 
date, time, and frequency of each contact. 
OSL cards must accornpany your listir^g 
and a signed de<:Earat{on must be made as 
to the maKir^unn power aniJ type of equip- 
meni used. Application lee Is $15.00 to 
help t^fray the cost ol t^ large 30Mnch 
engravied trophy. 

DKCC MilHwail 

This award Is also sponsored by the 
Mi t if wart NaUonat Jotjmst of QRPp. 
Ttte same rules apply for this award as 
for the OXCC-QRPp except that all ir>- 
df cat ions of power level Should read 
"urvder one Watt output.*' Applications 
are tlie 5dm« as for DXCC-ORPp. 

Th« Mitiiwatt Field Day Trophy 

Initiated in I970i this trophy is awarded 
ro I he highesrscoring QHPp station fn the 
ARRL Field Pay event held each year In 
the month of June. To enter, you must 
sutynit an ARRt summary sheet, plus a 
listing of the statior^s yoit worked, band by 
band. You must state in your application 
the power level used, ttte type of equip- 
ment, and your me! hod of measuring out- 
put power. If you use 1-5 Watts^ you may 
multiply your score tsy four. 

For power levels less than one Watt, 
you may muHiply your score tȴ 5Jn addi- 
tion, an^other IS times youf score may be 
addet) for operating youf ORPp station in- 



dependent of po Hirer mains. Anoifier 150 
bonus points are earned for full poriatsle 
setup away from youf QTH. 

A{\ three awards, the DXCC-ORPp, the 
DXCC Miinwatt, and the Wftiwait Field 
Day Trophy, are obtainable by making ap- 
plfcatlon to: Adrian Weiss WORSP, 63 
Suburban Estates, Vermlthon SD 57069. 

XV WORLD JAMBOREE 

MONDIAL 

The Calgary Amaieur Radio Afrsocia- 
lion will be operating VE^tiWSJ from the 
site of the XV World Jamtx>ree IMondlaF on 
July 1-16, 1933. The station will operate 
all bands and modes. Suggested frequen- 
cies: 7.030 MHz CW on the half hour; 
iAA90 SSa on ttte hour. 

NATIONAL 
TOM SAWYER DAYS 

The Hannibal Amateur Radio Ctut>, Inc., 
wHI issue a third annual special cer- 
tlffcate Irom the National Tom Sawyer 
Days ceJebratlon In fiflark Twain's boy- 
hood hometown, Hannibal, Missouri, on 
July 3-4, 1983. Hours 1500-2100 UTC 
both days^ Frequencies: phone— 7,24S» 
14.290. 2t.400, an^ 2ST70, CW— 7 125 and 
21.125 MHz. Help us Celebrate! To receive 
the certificate, send a large (8 x tO^SASE 
and youf persona i OSL card conttrming 
the contact to Hannibal Amateur Radio 
CJub. Inc., WOKEM, 2108 Orchard Avenue, 
HannltiBl MO 63401. For further informa- 
tion, contact Tony Mc Umber at the above 
address or call {314}-221-6199 

SPACE DAY *83 

The Cascades Amateur Radi{3h Society 
ICARS), in conjunction with the Michigan 
Space Center in J ackaon, Michigan, is of- 
fering a Space Day certificate to all £ta- 
tion& who work WSSCSQ during Space 
Day activities. Look for WB6CSO on 3.900, 
7^^. 14.285, 21.360, and 28.StO start irvg 
at 0000 GMT July 9 through 1700 GMT Juiy 



10, A orte^ollar contridutiOn is asked to 
cover cost of postage and matenais. Mail 
your log infoimatiofi and (I.OO to CARS. 
Space Day 83, PC Bok 512. Jackson Ml 
49204. 

USS COD 

Having started in June, merrtbefs of Ihe 
Northern Ohio Amateur Badio Society wiH 
tie operating daily through Labor Day from 
the USS Cod. a World War H submarifve on 
permanent display at the port of 
Cleveland. QhiO- 

Using the callsign K8KRG. NOARS 
members will be operating in the lower 
pcrtiQn of the General band on 80 through 
10 meters. Special Novice operations wMi 
be conducted on July 9 and 10 and August 
2Q aiHJ 21. On those dates, stgnals from 
fti* USS Cocr will be found m the middle of 
the Novice l»and- 

A speciaf 8 m ti ceftilicaie win be 
available upon request. Please send a 
OSL confirming the contact and $i for 
handling and postage to WD8HZG. 3927 
Torrance Ave., Brooklyn OH 44144. 

ANNIE OAKLEY 

SPECIAL EVENT STATIOM 

Again, il Is the pleasure of W8UMD. ihe 
Treaty CUy Amateur Radio Association, 
Ir^c, to bring you ihe Annie Oakley Special 
Event Station from Greenville, Ohio, on 
Saturday, July 30. and Sunday, July 3i. 
1983 We will be operating from the Garst 
Museum which houses two rooms of 
memorabilia, guns, trophies, and cos^ 
turner of "Little Shaipsiiooter/' the name 
given to Annie by Chief Sitting 8ull 
Operating times will be 1400 to 0100 UT on 
Saturday and 1400 to 2200 UT on Sunday. 
Frequencies will be 20 kHz up from the 
General phone portion of the 40- and 20- 
mater bands, with excursions Into the 
Novice segments of 40 and 15 meters. 
Your QSLar>d an BASE toTCAHA. PO Box 
%l, Greenville OH 45331, will bring you a 



beauti fur certificate and a pamphfet at>out 
Annie OaMey. 

DETROIT ARSENAL 

The Tank Automotive Command ARC 
will operate WBJPW on 30 July 1983 from 
1300-20002 to commemorate Ihe 42iid 
year oi the Detroit Arsenal, home cf the 
nation '$ lir^t defense plant and the US 
Army Tank-Automotive Command, Fre- 
quencies; pttone— 7.250^7:274, 21.400. 
and T46.4t MHz. CW — 7.05& ffom 
1500-1700Z. Please put your QSO numtser 
and frequency on upper ieft-hand corner 
of your outer envelope. For an unfolded 
certificate, send a 9" x 13" SASE to: 
WQJPW. US Army Communications Com- 
mand, Attn: CCNC-TAC-M, 29251 Van 
Dytce. Wajren Ml 48090, 

BtX BIEOERBEOK 

The Davenport Radio Amateur Qluli will 
operate WfflBXR to commemorale the 
great jazz player Bix Biederbeck and the 
city of Davenport during the Qik &ieder- 
beck Memorial Jazi Festival, from 16D0Z 
July 30 to 0300Z July 31 . and from tSOOZto 
2300Z on July 31. Op«raiion on phofie and 
CW, all bands about tO KH2 up from lower 
end of General -class band edges To 
receive a certificate, send a largo SASE to 
DRAC, cto David Johannsen WB^F^P, 
2131 Myrtle St., Davenport I A 52604. 

UKCOLN BOYHOOD 
MEMORIAL 

Ttie Pike Gouniy Amateur Radio Club 
will Operate station W9CZH from the Lin- 
coln &oyhood Memorial. Lincoln City, In- 
diana, from 1700Z July 30 to 1700Z July 31. 
Special QSLs will be k&sued for your OSL 
and ^n SASE to Richard Baliey KC9VH, 
Box 311 RRl.WlnsJow IN 47598 Fre^uen^ 
cies will b«: 3 925. 7.265, t4.305, and 
21.395 phone; 14.090 HTTY; 146,52 FM: 
and 7.133 CW, 



RTTY LOOP 




MarcL LeaveYf M,D, WA3AJR 

c/oJZ 

Peterborough NH 03458 

Vm going to start out this month by an- 
swering a question I raised last months 
wm Ifut rm sure haa t>een just burning In 
the mir>ds of many o^you. Just M^hat does 
Mr, Fefrell do with stations lacking a call- 
sign inthealphal:>etlcaJ listings in fiis new 
GuiUs To RTTY FreQuenciesl 

Wellp shortly after last month's column 
was put to bed. \ received a full copy of 
this new book, and i now can teR you tne 
answer^th^y ate no* mcluded In ttw at- 
phabetical-t>y^calisign list. Only those sta^ 
tions with callsigns are! Reviewing the 
pages in tt>e missing signature also 
show^ a neat, short treatise on caMsign of- 
Igins and some other trivia In the same 
yolh- Makeg a good bit of reading. The seC' 
on d edition Quitt& To RTTY Frequencies Is 
available from Gitfer Associates, Inc.. PO 
Box 239, 52 Park Avenue, Park Ridge, New 
Jersey 07656, for 19.95. As always, plug 
Itlis column witen you write, Qk7 

Nivvr in all my wiliest expectations did 
I anticipate the veritable flood of m- 
sponses to my offer of a 6600 and/or 6502 
RTTY terminal program. In the past, sever- 



al such comments have drawr) but a luke- 
warm response, but not nowl WUh more 
letters received than on any other single 
topic in the more than six years ol t Jiis col- 
umn, over half of the letters pleaded for 
6600 softwarep with the majority of the 
others backing the 6502-based Atari 
400/SOO. Let's take a loolt at a sampie of 
what some of you said, 

Philip Doem K9P0. Indianapolis. Irhdi- 
an^ "Let me identify mysetf as one of Ihe 
very interested 6! (people worldwide inter- 
ested in the 6800}. I do, however, disagree 
t hat t he d&OO i s a dead sy st em, Th Is i s pos- 
sibly the only microcomputer ever offered 
whose purchasers have been 4bfe to 
make relatively ii^eit pensive mods to re- 
main current v^ith the state of the an," 

Horace HaJi Wfl40GM, Peterson AFB, 
Colorado: "In msponse to your request for 
comments...!, fof one, would certainly 
be interested! f really don't think the 6800 
la dead, though the ham fraternity may 
wish to hear more about the department- 
store computers sir\ce they are so readily 
evaiiabie and the prfces are so good, tf all 
is lost for the 6800 and the r^ew depart- 
ment-store computers are wtiat flTTY 
hams want to hear aboui, then «l feasf 
choose one with an honest to-gosh key- 
board, After all, we are going to have to 



type on them 1o get our messages across, 
so let's try to do so comfortably. ' 

Weldy Moflall VE5NM, Regina, Sas- 
katchewan. Canada: 'Please don't set the 
6800 aside. There are a large number of 
theae machines about and most a?e in the 
hands of persons that like to get ir>lo the 
Innams. Trie 6fi00 on the S-50 bus is the 
id^al machine for the hobbyist that wa.nis 
to tinker with hardware and software." 

Joseph Ryan WB5LLM, Florence, MIs^ 
sissippi: "About dropping interest In 
6S00-based micros: Stopi Please don't 
give up on 6800- based micros, 6SO0 as- 
sembly-language programs can t>e cross- 
assembied to 6609 language." 

Nick Hulbert KG5N, LubOoCk, Texas: 
"The 6600 with tho S-50 bus is an exp«f^ 
menter's dfoarn. A person who likes to 
build and add to his system can simply 
put whatever he wants on the 30-pin card 
and plug it In, In fact, if I want to go to the 
6609 or even the 6502, 1 can gel a CPU card 
to do this and plug it Into my 6800 main- 
frame. A far cry Irom what you can dO with 
some of the other fnacfiir^s feasilyji t'm 
trying to say thai the6600 isnofdeadand 
there are a biinch of units out there," 

John Davison WOZFN. Kirkwood, Mis- 
souri: "I am very much Interesied in any- 
thing you want to print on the 6600. It 
might be dead, but mine Is very much 
allvel It is a 0-1 Motorola evaluation 
boafd.^' 

Thomas Hand WtMlUQ. Louisville, Ken- 
tucky: 'I am interested in a RTTY program 
lor the SBOO-type computer, t have an APF 
computer which I enjoy very myqii.'* 

Of course, not everyone Is so u nl versa I- 



iy t>ehlnd the 66O0 as the ideal CPU. For 
example. . . 

Howard Busson W8WGB, Akron. Ohio; 
"F quit reading your column when you got 
off on the 6800 kick. I would suggest that 
you lean moie towards the el cheapos 
(like Ifw color computer)/' 

Stephen Carier K»GV2. ftifte, Colorado: 
'It is tfuly unfortunate that the market did 
not support the 6800-6&09 microproces- 
sors, because they were easy to program 
and had really quite elegant arch i lecture. 
However, realities being what they are, I 
suspect that any article based on a 6800 
would have an extrem«ly Hmite<l audi- 
enoe. On the otti^ hand, if you used Lhe 
rimex-Sinclaif, VI 0^20, Atari, of Radio 
Shack Color Computer, ttve low prices of 



m 






ACCuMuLAtOfl 



e BITS 



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B 


C 


a 


e 


H 


L 



rNSTRyCTIOH 
DECODER 



1 



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«-BlT FrEOrSfERi 



to 

* ^EXTEITIIAL 

WEnomr 



~~> A&0flEI5^ Bus 

"^ i«BJrri) 



Fi§. t 80d0 bfock i^iagram. 

73 Magazine • July, 19S3 107 



ADOMCSS BUS 



OUTPNUT fUfPettf 






bCCOOEH 



I 



■tfilSttK 



E»T* BUFFER 



T 



* » 



DATA 
9US 






J STACK PQINTEH 



lEi ItTS 



■• * ACCUiMUI. ATQR A « ■ITS 



kUCtV WftST^ft 



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ACCUWULArOft B 



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F^. 2 6600 ttock (fisgrmn. 



these compiilefs would ma)^e it feasible 
tolMy on« and dedicate il only to ham ra^ 
dJio.^ I miQhi point out io STeve that tti« 
CoCd JS S8094}aged. 

James Theksen WB6REM, Gaylord. 
Mictilgan; "I am trying to understand ma- 
chine code and hope to write or modify an 
existing RTTY program for Ihe Pel." Stay^ 
tun^! 

Rich Gehie N4DPQ. Nlchofaaville, Ken- 
lucky; ^'11 ^ou are considermg a prc^Qtam 
for Afan on RTTY, please go ftw it Tne 
present pfogram is so restrtciive and in- 
convenient^ we are looking tor fetief/* 

tt occurs to mo thai, to a large extent, a 
good deal of the above may he beyond the 
ken of many readers SSOO, &809, 6502, 
8080, Z'80— these are Ihe substances ot 
articles In Byt^ of 6B Mfcro Journal, male- 
rial rarely consumed by the average ama- 
teur. The truth is, (or most commerciaily- 



avatlai>le systems, the sottware offered it 
far more important than the centra pfo^ 
cessing unit, or CPU. which is what all 
Iho^e numtsera above were all about. But, 
Wvfe will be writing software, we are going 
to have to commit to a parttcular GPU, Of 
at least a similar group. Perhaps a look at 
history will be levealmg. 

In the beginning, (here was rto micro- 
processor, onFy big computers withtut>es 
or diSErele solid-stale devices. Alier 
much work, trying to produce a general- 
purpose calculator integfated circuity the 
Jntel 4004 was bofn This tour-tiit handler 
was the (oretalher of today's mlcrqconv 
puter breetf- The next step was increasing 
the data capacity to eight bits, and the 
8008 was bom. I still remember the Mark-B 
computers, home-brewad Ic use this chip 
In the early 1970s. An updated S008 was 
introduced by Intel in 1973, called the 



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80B0, and within two years the micro com- 
puter revoiulion was off and funning. 

The design philosophy of the 8080 was 
an attempt to implement acaieufator-type 
architecture on one chip, tracing back to 
the 4<KX roots. Six general -pur|iase regls^ 
ters, stack and program counters, and a 
flag register wofk with one accumulator to 
provide internal data manipulations, input 
and output is directed over special i;0 
channels. A block diagram of the Intel 
8060 is shown in Fig. 1. 

A year after the Introduction ot the 
BOao, Motorola prasented its version ot 
tt>e eight &pt micropfocessor. the 6600, 
Rattier than the register orientation of itie 
8060. the 6800 is memory-oriented, that is, 
any memory location can serve as dat^ 
instructions, a register, or even an inputf 
output devlice. By freeing up the organ iza- 
Hon, the 6600 becomes easier to program, 
and the more flexible addressing allowed 
by the 6800 makes this series, and ones to 
follow in Ihis llne^ inherently more power- 
ful. Fig. 2 shows the simple organization 



of the Motorola 6&00, which contains two 
accumulators, an index register, stacK 
and {^rogtam counters, and condition 
code, or flag, regiister. 

The next move was taken by several ex- 
emptoyees of Motorola who joined lorcea 
with a calculator chtp manufacturer, MOS 
Technology, to produce an enhanced 
6600. The indent register, a two-t}yte point- 
er in the 6€00p was broken into two eight^ 
bit index registers, and new modes of ad- 
dressing were added. The B accumulator 
was discarded, and other refinements 
were made to some of the internal archi- 
tecture. The result was the &S0t2. the block 
diagram ot which is stvown in Fig. 3. 

The net result is that there axe two ma^ 
tor families among poputaf microcompul- 
ers: the 6080, with its enhanced version^ 
the Z~30, and the GSOO, 6602, and lately the 
6609. an enhanced 6600. series. Although 
Important dilferences eyelet between 
members o1 Ihese groups, as a rule pro- 
grams that are written lor one may be 
translated, not always directly, from one 
to the other. 



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106 73 Magazine • Jufy. 1983 



The Spider Antenna 



The modern multi-band mobile antenna 
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without stopping to change resonators. 
restures of ifie Spider - Mntenns 

• The Spider ^'^^ Antenna is less than sik feet high 
and the longest re senator projects out from the 
mast 24 inches. This gives a slim pro- 
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cHminating the need for a \. 
spring mount. \ 

• Each re^ooatot %% tiizied to 
the desired portion of the band by 
a tuning sleeve which slides over the 
outside of the resonator* 

• SWK isapproximaterly 1:1 at the 
selected resonant frequency, 

• Base impedance approximately SQ 
ohins^ requiring no matching nttwork. 

• Ideal for use on vans, campers, 
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ment houses andcondoriiiniums* 
The Spftfet' ' AdApt^r converts 
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The Spider^ marlifmer'^ is the ultimate for 
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Spider'^" resonators and tuiung sleeve** 

MCCesSQffes — Biunper, balU angle and stud 
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73 Magazine • July, 1983 109 







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without daisy wheel 

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George Young, co-author of Microajinfmtmg mngarineV 
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• NOVICE LICENSE STUDY QUlDE^by Timo\tw M Dani^i NSRK. Here is (tie niosl up to date novii^ 
guide available, 1 1 is complete with infofmaiion about leamiriig Morse Code, has the latest FCC amaleiir 
regulations arid tt*e current FCC applfcali^on forrn^ This guide *& not a question^answet rrvemofrzalion 
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Timothy M. Daniel N8RK This is the 
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Learning rather than memorizing is the 
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"GENESIS" 

S WPM — CT7305— Ihts is tt»e beginning tape for people 
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1S+ WPM — CT 731 3— Code groups again, al a brtsk 14 
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'''' HAND BOOKS FOR 
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THE TEN METER FW HANDBOOK^ by Bob Heft K^E^D, 
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en thus last learn more about the mafiy meihods of con- 
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THE COMPLETE SHOftTWAVE LISTENER'S HAND- 
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includacl BK124t sg 95 

THE PRACTICAL HANDBOOK OF AMATEUR RADIO FM 
REPEATERS— by BH( Pasternak WASITF (author of 73 
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THE 73 TEST 
EQUIPMENT LIBRARY 

VOL 11 AUOK> FREQUENCY TESTERS^ J aitHJacked 
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tooSLB7360S1.9S.- 

VOL III RADIO FREQUENCY TESTERS— Radio frequen 
cy waves, the common denomlnaloi of amateur radio. 
Such Itema as SWR, anienna Impedance, line imped- 
ance, RF output, and field strength: detailed Instructions 
on testing these Items Includes sections on signal gen- 
erators, crystal calibrators, ^rid dip oscillators, noise 
generators, dummy loads, and much rrtore. 
LB7361$195» 



VOL. IV IC TEST EQUlPMEffT— BeC^Kne a troublfr 
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meter, etc 252 pages BK1044 15.95.* 



JHIERFERENGE 

NDBOOK 




THE 73 
TECHNICAL 

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TOOLS » TECHNIQUES FOR ELECTRONICS-by A A 
Wicks IS an easy to understand book wrrtten lor the 
beginning kit-buiider as^ well a? the ex[^^«enced hot*^ 
byiat It has numerous pictures and descripijons of lh« 
safe and correct ways to usebasi'C and speciaJize<ttoOts 
iof electronic pfoiects. as wen as specialized metal^ 
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repair shops, Bt^7348 S4.96/ 

BEHIND THE DIAL^Thls book explains, In detail, 
what '51 going on on all the frequencies, from short yva^re 
up lo mFCrovtfave, It gives the reader a good idea of wtiat 
he can find and where to find it, including some of the 
secret stations such as the C.IA and the F.B.L 
Evefylhing is covered short of microwave monitoring 
Anyorte mterested in purchasing a shortwave receiver 
shoufd tiave a copy of this book. survBiilwice, station 
layool consktefaiion, antenna syStfima, inteftace, and 
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BK7307 $4.95 

THE NEW WEATHER SATELUTE HANDBOOK -by Or 
Ralph E Taggart WB8DOT, Here is the completely up- 
dated and revised edition containing all the informa- 
tlon on the mo^t sophisticated and effeclive space- 
craft now in orbit This book serves both the experi- 
enced amateur sateMlle enthusiast and the newcomtr, 
It is an introduction to satellite watching, providing all 
the mtormation required to construct a complete and 
highly effective ground station Sotid Irardware 
designs and all the instructions necessary to operate 
She eguipmeni are included Fo^ exijefim enters who 
Are op«fatmg stations, ihe book deiails all procedures 
nece^ary to modify equipment lor the new series of 
spacecraft. Antaieur weatr>ei satellite activity repre- 
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leged few in watchmg the spectacle of earth as seen 
from space on your own moniloring equipment, 
BK7a83 S8.95, " 



PROPAQATION WIZARD'S HANDBOOK— by J. R 
Nelson Wfien sunspots riddled tfte worldwide com^ 
municationa r>etwofks of tfte 1940s, John Hen^y Nelson 
looked lo ttifl ptanels tor an answer The r^glt was a 
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ptanetary aHgnment thai made the author the most r«^ 
liatiie forecaster In America today. The book provides an 
enitghlened look at commynrcalion^ past, present and 
future, aa well as leaching the art ol propagation 
forecasting, BK7302S6 9S.* 

SSB, . THE MISUNDERSTOOD WO0£-by James B 
Wilson. Single Sideband Transmission, . thousands of 
us use 11 every day, yet it remains one of the least 
under stood facets of amateur radio. J. B. Wilson 
pmsents several methods of sidet^and generation, am- 
ply illustrated with charts and schematics, which will 
enable the ambitious reader lo construct his own side- 
t>and gen era toe A muat lor tfie techn^caify-stfnou^ ham 
BK7351 S5J0/ 

INTERFERENCE HANDBOOK— i>y William R Nelson. 
WA6EQG — This timely handbook covers every type of 
RFI problem and gives you the solutions based on 

gractical eKperlence, Covers interference lo TV, radio, 
I'fl, telephone, radilo amateur, commercial and CB 
equipment, Power line interference is covered in depth 
—how to locate It. cure II, work with the public, safety 
precautions, how to train RF/( investigators. Written by 
an RFI expert with 33 years of experiehce, this profuse- 
ly illustrated book is packed with practical easy-to^ 
understand information. BK1230 Si 1,95, 

OWNER REPAtR OF RAD!0 EOUIPMENT— by FraAK 
Glass K5RQ Here s a txtok that wtM teach you an ap- 
proach to iroubieshootmg without a shack full ot test 
equipment Written in a narrative. nonmatherTiaticil 
style. It w lit encourage you lo successfully fix your own 
rig prot)lems 80 to 90% Of Ihe time Even rf you don'l 
want 10 fiv. you can team a lot about how things work 
and tail. Add to your library and personal expertise. 
BK7310$7 95/ 



FOR THE 
CONTESTER 



THE CONTEST COOKBOOK -This book rgi4fi«ls the 
secrets of triat elite group of operators who top the list 
when the contest results are published » contains 
detailed suggesNons tor the first-time cootester as well 
as tips for the advanced operator. Domestic, DX. and 
specialty contests are all discussed, complete with 
photographs and diagrams showing the equipment and 
operating aids used By the lop scorers. For the serious 
contesler 9K730fl SS,95. 




WORLD 
PRESS SERVICES 






2 NEW RTTY BOOKS 



WORLD WIDE RADiO TELETYPE STATIONS IN FRE- 
QUENCY ORDER— eth EDITION Compiled by Unlver- 
sal Electronics, Inc. Contains £198 frequencies ot sta- 
tions that have beert logged In 1982. Frequency. cal9 
sign, name ol station, mj coi/nlry symbol times of 
reception and details are included. All types of WWf 
stations are listed Including schedules of 62 press and 
nevfs agencies operating on 637 f re<;uencies Includes 
77 meteorological statior^s on 279 frequencies. Covers 
all RTTY sl^t^ons from 3 MHZ lo 30 MHZ, air, metro, 
govern meni. military, diplomatic, covers aft services. 
This is the most accurate RTTY list there is and a must 
for the serious RTTY enthusiast BK1270 110.95 

WORLDWIDE RADIO TELETYPE CALL SIGN LIST OF 
UTILITY STATIONS -etn EDITION Compiled by Univer 
sal Electronics, inc. Contains more than 4000 call 
signs ih alphanumerical order, Alt types of stations are 
listed. 163 utility station mnemonit^a and name abbre- 
viations. Plus abt^revfatlohs for regional states in 
Australia. Canada. USA and USSB. All ITU Symbols 
designating countries or geographical areas. Table of 
allocatiorr of international call sign series. Revised 
radio reg til aliens on indentification of at at ions. irKziud- 
ing formation or call signs. AN services listed. 
6K127t $4,95 

70 YEARS Of RADIO TUBES AND VALVES— by John 
Stokes "Great, the best book oh the history of radio 
tubes that I've ever seenf" raved 73's technical editor. 
Written by an expert who has been involved In radio 
since '29r Ihls book i^lll be of special interest to "old- 
llmers" and will provide those younger hams with a 
unique sense of the history of their hobby, BK1272 
S21.95 

EVERYTHtNO YOU ALWAYS WANTED TO KNOW 
ABOUT AMATEUR TELEVlSfON. (but wwi afraki lo astc) 
—By Mike Stone WBCQCD. This book j& a compiele 
guide to setlirig up your own amateur radio televi:Sion 
statKin. It cooiains— A history, what equiprr^ent you 
need, vkleo Ittsofy, cameraa, recordefs^ liohtlng, special 
ef feels, sound ATV DXInp. mobile FSTV, ATV repealers, 
ATV groups, building projects, lest equipment, dealer di- 
rectory, a cumulative indent of over 10O0 ariieles on ama- 
teur TV and much more. This is tfie new, 1982 edition. 
From the publishers of Amateuf TeSevtsmn Magazine. 
BK1244 ?e,95 

WORLD PRESS SERVICE FREQUENCIES- by 
Thomas Harrington Can'l watl to hear the evening 
news. Of afe you wondering at>out the news that you 
srenl hearing"^ Receive by Radio Teletype (RTTYI aff 
the world news and fmanciai hapijenm^s from the 
woffd caprtolson a 24 hour a day basfs.ThiiatXK)k gives 
you the frequencies and limes of broadcast of such 
news services as A P. UP I. Reuters, TASS. VOA and 
London Press Also included ts an introduction io 
RTTY with information on equipment, antennas, abbre- 
viations- every Ihing you need to get started in RTTY. 
BK1202S7,95- 



•Use the order Gard In this magazine or itemize your order on a separate piece ot paper and mail to; 73 Radio Bookshop • Peterborough NH034&B. Be sure to includs Check or 
detailed credit card Information, No C,0,0. orders accepted, $1.50 for Ihe first book, Si 00 each addlllonal book lor U.S. delivery and foreign surface. For foreign airmail $10.00 
per book. Please allow 4-6 weeks for delivery. Queafions regarding your order? Please write to Customer Service at the above address, ^Prices subject lo change on books not 
published by 73 Magazine.) 

FOR TOLL FREE ORDERING GALL 1-800-258-5473 



RADIO 

ANTENNA BOOKS 




CUBICAL 

QUAD 



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VMF AWTENNA HANDEtCX3K-Th« ne* VWF Anf«fl*i* 
H^naboGk detaUs lf*e theory, desigri, and consirycthon 
of hundred £ Qf difrerent VHF afi<j UHF antennas a 
practical book ^rilten for ih€ avetage amateur who 
1ak«9 Joy tn bMHd^ng, not fuir of complect formulas for the 
design engmeer Packed wilh fabulous antenna pfojdcts 
you can buHd. BK736e S5.95." 

ALL ABOUT CUBICAL QUAD ANTENNAS (2nd fidl- 
lionj^The "Classic " on Quact deaign, theory, con- 
struction, and operation. New 2nd e^itJon contains 
new fged and: matChlAli systems and new data BK 1 196 
S6 95. 

THE RADIO AMATEUR ANTENNA HANDBOOK— All 

about wire antennas, tseams. tuners, batuns, coax, 
ridtals. SWR and lowers, Claar and complete infortna- 
tion. BKn99$7.95 

SIMPLE* LOW-COST WIRE ANTENNAS FOR RADia 
AMATEURS— All new d^ta and tVttfything you want to 
know about low-cost, myltf-band antennas, inexpensive 
bftams, "mvisible" antennas for hani3 ^n "tough' loca- 
tions. BK120O $7,95 




n DIPOLE AND LONQ WIRE ANTENNAS~by Edward 
M. Noll W3F0J, Tr^ls Is the JirsI coJ lection of virtually 
every type of wire antenna used by amateurs. Includes 
dimenstons. configurations^ and detailed construction 
data for 73 differefi't antenna type? Appendices 
descnb« ttie construction of noise bfidQies. line tuners, 
and data on measuring resonant frequency, velocity 
factor, arvd swr BK. 1016 $&.50/ 

BEAiyi ANTENNA HANDBOOK {New 5th edition)— by 
WilNam I, Orr & Stuart D, Cowan. YagI beam theory, con* 
structlon and operalion. Information on wife beams, 
SWR curves and matching systema. A "must" for 
serious DXera. BK1197 $7.95. 



HOW TO DEFEND YOURSELF AGAINST RADAR— by Bryce F. Bogner and James R Bodnar. a lawyer ^n^ rtdtf 
expert This boo4 gives you the ammunition to challenge the radar "evidence '^ that usually leads to a speeding 
conviction. Tlie major part of the book details the tnner wof kings of radar — you'll bNecomis more of an expert than 
n^at poltce officers and fudges The remainder of the book outlines how to defend yourself against a speeding 
tic*tet— the observations, measures and testimony you must obtain to deren<| yoiirself without the help of a 
iawy«f . Tfte price ■» « tot less than a hnal BKl20t S6.i&* 

N 



MICROCOMPUTER BOOKS 



THE SELECTRIC J NT £R FACE— by George Young. You 
need the quairty print that a daisy wh«el printer pro- 
¥l<te£ but the thought of buying on« makes your wallet 
wilt SELECTRIC TM INTERFACE, a Step- by-Step guide 
10 interfacing an IBM Seleciric IfO Writer to your micro* 
computer, wiB g^ve you that quality at a fraction of the 
price. George Young, coaulhof of Kdotaud Microcom- 
puting magazine's popular "Kilobaud Kfassroom" 
seriE^s. offers a iowcosi alternative to buying a daisy 
wheal printer, SELECTRtC INTERFACEmcludos: step- 
bystep fnslructians, lips on purchasing a used Selec- 
trie, informafiiqn on vadous Selectric models, includ- 
ing the 2740, 2960, and Dura 1D41, driver software for 
^0, BOflO, and 6502 Chips, tips on Interfacing tech- 
nidues. With SELECTHIC INTERFACE and some back- 
ground in electronics, you can have a ntgh-qyatity, low- 
cost, letter-qua tFty printer. Petals not included, BK73fia 
S1ZJ7 



40 COMPUTER QAMES FROM KMOBAUD MfCnOCOM- 
PUTINQ— Forty games jn nine different caterer ^es. 
Games for large and small systems, and a section on 
calculator games. Many versions of BASIC used and a 
wide variety of systems represented. A must for the 
aerlous computer game sm an. BK73ai $7.95* 



KILOBAUD KLASSROOM— By George Young and Peter 
Stark:. Leamirig electronics ttieory withoMt practice i$rt*| 
etdy. And it's r>o fun to buikj an electronics pfoject that 
mu can't use. Kiiotaatf Kiassroom tfie popular series 
finl published in Hiiobaud Microcomputing, combines 
thdoiy with practice. This is apfacrfcdiT course in digital 
electronics, ft starts out with very simple electronics 
projects, and by the end of the course you'll construct 
your own working microcomputer! SK73S6 314.95 



TEXTEDIT— A Gniw^Ble Word Processing Sysiem In 

kll loim^by Irwin Rappaport. TEXT^DfT Is an inexperv 
sive word processor mar you can adapt to suit your 
needs, from writing form letters to large texts. It is writ- 
ten in modules, so you can load and use only those por* 
tions ttiat you need Included are rnpduies that perform 
rfghl lustification, ASCII upper/lowercase conversion, 
one^key phrase entering, complete editorial functions^ 
and much more! TEXTtOiT Is wrllien in TRS-60' Disk 
BASIC, and the modules are documented In the 
author's admirably clear tutorial writing style. Not only 
does Irwin Rappaport expfain how to use TEXTEDiT: he 
also e3i plains programming technRjitds Implemented 
in the system. TEXTEDIT is an Inexpensive word pro- 
cessor that hetps you learn about BASIC program- 
ming. It is written for TftS^ Models I and lit with TRS- 
DOS 2.2/2.3 and 32K. 'TRS-eO and TRSDOS are trade- 
marks of the Radio Shack Division o* Tandy Corpora 
tlon. BK7387 S9.fl7 



COMPUTER CARf^lVAL— by Richard ftamella. Your 
child can become a crackerjack computerlst with the 
sixty THS'80 Level II programs in COMPUTER CARNI- 
VAL This large-type. Spiral bound book for beginners 
is a veiitabie funhouse of gamea, graphics, quizzes 
and p4^3le&. Written by SO M/cro columnist Richard 
Rameila, the programs are challenging enough to en- 
sure continued learning, yel sfkjft enough to provide 
your child with the immediate delight and reward ol 
masterino basic com>puting skills. And for even greater 
enjoyrrwnt. get the CARNIVAL COMPANION, a 30-mi- 
fiutef CMUMtte containing all the programs in the book. 
BimfnatBS tiresome typing and lets your child spend 
more lime enjoying the programs. BK7389 S16^97 
CC73B9 Book and Cassette 124,97 



SHOP 



COOK BOOKS 



TTL COOKBOOK- by Don Lancaster Enplains what 
TTL IS, how It works, and how to use it Discusses prac 
tical appiicattons, such as a digital counter and dhs- 
play system^, events countef. electrontc stopwatch, 
digital^ voltmeter and a digitai tachometer 
BK1063S9 50' 

CMOS COOKBOOK— by Don Lancaster. Details the 
application of CMOS, the low power logic family 
suitable for most applications presently dominated by 
TTL Required reading lor every serious drgitai ex- 
perimefiier! BKIOil StO,50/ 

TVT COOKBOOK— by Don Lancaster Describes the 
use of a sianoard television receiver as a micropro- 
cessor CRT terminal EMpiams and descnt>es charac- 
1^ generation, cursor control ^nd interface mforma- 
tion in typical, easy to- understand Lancaster style 
BKtO&4|9 9<5^ 

tC OP AMP COOKBOOK— by Walter G. Jung. Covers 
not only the basic tneory of the IC op amp in great 
detail, bul also includes over 250 practical cifcuit ap- 
plicalicins, liberally illusirated. 592 pages, 5%xBYi, 
softbound. BKia28tt4 95.' 



THE WELL 

EQUIPPED 
HAM SHACK 



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WORLD REPEATER ATLAS— Completely updated, over 
230 paQtt of repeater listings are ir>diexed by kx:ation 
and fr^uency More than 5€ maps pir^pomt 2000 repeat- 
er locations througfiout ir>e USA. Foreign listings in- 
clude Europe, the Middle East, South America, and 
Africa. BK7315^.00 

THE MAGIC OF HAM RADIO-by Jerrold Swank 
WBHXR. Under various call signs, W8HXR has been 
heard on the ham bands Since 1919^ He has watched 
amateur radio grow from the days of Model A spark colts 
to an era of mi cj^o processors and satellite communica- 
tions. Jerry has responded to calis for help from eanh- 
quake-striei^ Managua and tomado^avaged Xenia. Ant- 
arctica, one of man's lonefidst outposts, has been a bit 
iess lon«ly, ttmrrks to Jerry's tireless phionepatching el- 
forts^ Ormwing on hts own cotqcful m%pmi0rKss and 
IfM^e of many otfi^r hams, Jerry fiias complied this word- 
picture of ham radio duhno tt}e past aix decadsa. 
8K7312 S4.95 

A GUIDE TO HAM RADIO-bv Larry Kahaner WB2NEL 
Whai's Amateur Radio all about? You can learn the 
basics of this fascinating hobby with this excellent 
beginner's guide. It answers the most frequenlly asked 
questions in an easy-going manner, and it shows the 
best way to go about getting an FCC license, A Guide to 
Ham Radio is an Ideal introduction to a hobby enjoyed 
by people around the world. BK7321 $4.95/ 

WORLD RADfO TV HANDBOOK 1»^ 2fiTH EOmON 

—This t>ook IS the bible of international broadcasters, 
providing the only authoritative source oi exact infor- 
mation about broadcasting and TV stations wor^d 
wk^. This 19^ edition is completely revrsed. giv- 
ing comprehensive coverage of st>on. medium and long 
wave. S60 pages of vital aspects of world listening, 
BKtl54 S16.50 



^ 



' Use the order card in this magazine or itemize your order on a separate piece of paper and mall to^ 73 Radio Bookshop • Peterborough NH 0345S. Be sure to Include check or 
detailed credit card information. Mo C.O.D. orders accepted. Si. SO for the first book, $1.00 each additional book for US. delivery and foreign surface. For foreign airmail $10 00 
per book. Please allow 4-6 weeks for delivery. Questions regarding your order? Please write to Customer Service at the above address. (Prices subject to change on books not 

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^S7 A E A/ Advanced Electronic 

Applications , , t20 

6 AC5D Computer Programs , , , , 130 
124 Ad vancftrf Com putef Ckjn trots . .A\ 

20 All Electfonics 79 

Amateuf gi&ctronic Supply , - . , 25 

£43 Amateur- WholeEais Ei^^tronies 

Ainpefsand Eleclronics .... .52 
169 A. P. Sysiem^ .... 89 

Appliances Equipment .,. 52 

Associated Radio 1t& 

469 BGCarl Electronics ,89 

11 Barker & Williamson, inc. 75 

305 Barry Electronics 37 

- Bill AshbyS Son S3 

BlacksburgOroup 18 

223 Bfiti sTwchWay . 52 

228 BuchmasterPublistiin^ 63 

255 BucHmaster Publish in g ..__.. 127 
* Bmt&rfiul Electronics Corp. 

. 79,123 

187 Cali Ulier Hats ... 126 

7 CecoCommunlcatione.Inc 97 

13 Coin hternaltonal, Inc. ....... 130 

163 CornRad.lrfC. ,^, ,....,, 130 

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66 

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4B2 Cofnmunical^ons EJ^ectfonics 

Specialties. Inc. 18 

15 Communications Spflciaiisis 

^ ^ .- i 4 ■ . .... 1 5, 7 1 

222 Computer App heat ion 9 123 

Compat&f Trader . ♦ . ♦ . 4 129 

25 Control Products UnlimUed .,,121 

Cotec ,.,,.. .129 

21 Current Development COfp 41 

106 Cushcrati Corp , . .79 



489 Cufihcraft Corp, 122 

12 C- Z, Labs< I nc. 93 

* Data Ed .63 

346 Dat a Sef vice Company 93 

25a Davilyn Corp . . , 129 

Dayiapro Elect rontcs. Inc 125 

DGM Electronics, Inc. . 125 

484 Digital Micros y^iems .. 116 

425 Doppler Systemis ....... .66 

219 E'Tek ., ...129 

453 EGE, Irvc ... ..**.,. 35 

146 E(49ctronic Ramt^ow Industries, Inc. 

. r . , .....,,. O 1 

172 Encon PhoiovoUaics 109 

248 Etco Electronics ..,,,.,.109 

22 Fair Radio Sales , , , , 129 

35 FaJcscariJnc. ........115 

218 Fftrntronics- . . 89 

23 Ffesh€*Cofp . .77 
S FojcTango Corp. ....._..,.... 97 

176 Galaxy EtectronJcs ..,.«., 130 

GHco internatlQnal .41 

465 Glllaspie 116 

229 Gizmo ElactronSes .127 

143 GL8 Electronics 51 

1&5 Got ds m it hScJ entitle Corp, 66 

466 Gordon West's Radio School .120 

476 Grove Enterprises ,,.,-. - 1 19 

31 Hal TfOntx 108 

Ham fta:df o Cfl*H#f .5 

Ham Radio Outlet 3.39 

33 Hamtronics, NY _ 142, 143 

4S2 Hamironrcs . IIS 

480 Heii Sound, Ltd 118 

184 Hlgti Technology Service Center 

320 Hooaier Electronics 16 

Hustlerjfic. . ..,.,....11 
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78 Independent Crystal Supply . , . , 129 61 Radio Amateur €^{(book, Inc 73 

39 International Crystal 97 488 RadioSocletyof Great Britain . ,11S 

39 Jan Crystals 36 397 Radio Worid 115 

JDLIndustrles 19 62 Ramsey Electronics 131.14!^ 

Kantronics , , , . 30, 31 1 33 Rivendell Associates .,...***. 127 

230 KCS QectronicsCOfp. - - .28 150 Royal , , . ,127 

KflfWiftMid Cov.lV,7 259 S&TElectronics .._... 77 

HLM Bectron^cs ,,,..,-. 4, 73, 77 65 SF Amateur Radio Serviosii. . . . 102 

204 L&conil3e 57 2S3 SdeniiTIc IrtstrumenU H 

* IjBfrArtJnc ,129 500 73 

^0 Lunar Electronics , i29 Books 98, 110-114,128 

236 Macaw E^ectfonlcs . .99 Dealer Ad « t ,-W 

44 l^lacrotTonicSf Inc 61 Moving 110 

45 Madison Elecironics. , .47 Subscription , 67, 127 

Malt Smith. T$ . ,.,... 130 ' SpEctrgnies 144 

3 MFJ EritBfpri&oe . . . , ... 10 6© SpeoiryftiCommuntcations . .68, 69 

233 MFJ Entefpnses 121 436 Specirum Intemationai, tnc .96 

234 MFJ Enter prises 123 3 Speedcail Corp. . S' 

260 MFJErfterpn&es 125 173 Spida* Antenna 109 

48 MHz Electronics 132-141 ' TetvTK 9. 116 

49 MJcro Control Specialti63. .,».... 29 477 TET/Antenna Systems ........ 1 16 

257 Microf FSti Softwaie . , 129 245 TETfSuJtronics ,,..,.... ,35 

5t M Icrolog Cor pof at ion ,.,.,. .42,43 ' The Antenna Bank 93 

461 Microwave Filter Co. 119 63 The Antenna Specialists 1 1 

Mirage Communications 17 449 The Ham Shack .., , 109 

256 MiBsour) Radio Center 75 205 The Met heny Corp. .11 

240 Mitfonix ,., ,-.*.., .....55 * The Fox River Radio League 16 

254 National Comm. Group Co 106 104 Tnonyx 96 

412 Nemal Electronics 127 197 Twin Oaks ft. A^ociales - 53 

478 NonLir^ear Systems 119 463 Unoar. .118 

137 Nuts i Voits .130 189 Universal Software . .130 

265 OmarBectror^lcs ......... 27 ' V-J Products. Inc. ... 57 

OrtJi'f Magazine _.........., .61 " Van Gorden Engineering 35 

P.G. Eject romcs ,....75.97 311 Vanguard Lebs + *,...»»**.., .127 

Palomar Engineers , . , 4 ' W9INN Antennas .,,.,, 102 

4 Parsec Communications 70 302 W-S Enginearing . . , 121 

159 Parsec Communlcal3ona 16 80 Western Radio Electronica .... 130 

182 Peterson Electronics ........ 130 83 Yaesu Elecironics ....... -Cov. Ill 

246 Pr^itiips-Tecti Electronics Corp. , . 28 479 Yaesu Electronics 1 19 




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73 Magazine • July, 1983 115 




Chod Hams VP2ML 

Box 4&81 

Santa Rosa CA 95402 

WAS YOURS BIG ENOUGH? 

The miiJdlie ot Ihe summer provtdes a 
tiTtm i<it r9fli>ctN?n and anticipation for the 
OXei. OXing i$ at ila worst of the year, with 
tvlgti ab^sorpflori Dn th« hrgher bands and 
statkc and nois@ on tti« lowar bands So 
t^« OXar reflects on "th.e onos that goi 
away'' taat yaaf and anticipates the ne»c1 
DX aeaaon, 

In fact^ the weal her m»ght even be n(c6 
«titiuah \o sntlce the DXef away trom &tat> 
Ic craahes ol the rig and outside for a oriti^ 
cal look at the skyhook. 

Have yoo ever heard ot a DXer who is to^ 
tally &aUs11eiJ with his antenna tarm? 
Summer bfJngs ihougtits of a ''rear' an* 
lenria. A trig one I Wouldn't it b& great to 
be known as a Big Gun. . . to ba first in the 
pi leaps! 

Alas, trie limitations of the tot. the 
neighbors, ana the pocifcetbook seerrt lo 
rule out instant Honor Roli status. t>u! per- 
haps a aiTiail upgrading is m ordef Aftef 
all, the bands are only going to get worse 
over ttm next few years, and (here aie 
many more DXars today than at the fast 
sunspqt minimum in 1975-6. Oomphetition 
urill be ifiterise. More antenna and rehivB- 
m«nt ot o^rating skills am the only de< 
fenses against deteriorating sunspot 
nun^bers. 

**lt your antenna laste<l the winter^ it 
waan't big enough," the saying goes. Ur>- 
fortunatety, there are many amateurs 
whose antennas were indeed larQe 
enough for this past winter Fof them, 
summer brings the chore of rebujidtng. 
perhaps a liHie belter than before, and on 
a stronger tower, of course. 

Now that we"rea1l In the mood for some 
serious antenna worK, I must share the 
lollowing. Picture an amaleur sitting at a 
desH, laboriously wrjting a letter lo an Jn* 
surance company: 

"I am writing in response to your r*- 
queit tor additional irt format ion in block 
number three of the accident -reporting 
form i put ^poor piannmg' as the cause of 
my accident You said in your letter that I 
should e?( plain more fulfy, and ( trust that 
ifit following detafia wjll be sufficient. I 
am an amateur radio operator On the day 
of I he aiCCJ^dent l was working} alone on the 



lop section of my new BO-ioot lower. 
When I fiad completed my work^ * discov- 
ered that 1 had, over the oourse Of several 
Utps up the tower, t^roti^tl up about 300 
pounds of tooJs ajid spare hardware. 
Rather than carry the now unneeded tools 
and material down by hand. I decided to 
lower the items down tn a small barrel by 
using a pultey. which fortunately was at< 
t ached to the gin pole at the top of the 
tower. 

"Securing the rope at ground level I went 
to the lop of the tower and loaded the tools 
and materlei Into the barrel. Then 1 went 
tjacK to the ground and untied Ihe rope, 
holding It rightly to ensure a slow desceni 
of the 300 lbs. Df tciols. You will note in 
block number eleven ot the accident-raport' 
ing form that l weigh only 155 Ibs- 

''Due to my surprise at being jerked off 
th« ground so suddenly, I lost my prea- 
ance of mind and torgot lo let go of lh# 
rope Needless to sayt i proceeded at a 
rather rapid rate of speed up the side ot 
tne tower In the vicimty of the 4C>'foot lev^^ 
eL * fTiet the barrel coming down. This ei- 
plains my fractured skull and hroken col* 
lartKine. Slowed only slightly, I continued 
my rapid ascent, not stopping until the fin- 
g«ft Of rfiy right hand w&re two knucktet 
deep into the pulley 

"Fodunatefy, by this um^^ t had re^ 
gained my presence of mind and was able 
10 hold on to the rope in spite of my pain. 
At ap^proximat^ly the same time, however, 
the barrel of tools hit the ground and th« 
bottom fell out of the barrel. Devoid of the 
weight of the toots, the barrel i^ow 
weighed approximately 20 pounds, I refer 
you again to my weight m block number 
eleven. As you might imagine, i began a 
rapid descent down the fiide of the tQwef . 
In the vicinity of the 40-fQoi level, I mat the 
barrel coming up. This accounts for Ihe 
two fractured ankles and the lacerations 
of my lags and lower body, 

"The encounter with Ihe barrel slowed 
ma enough to lessen my in juries when I 
fell onto the pile of tools and. fortunately, 
only three vertabrae were cracked. I am 
sorry lo report, however, thai as May there 
on the tools m pain, unable to stand, and 
watching the empty barrel 60 feet above 
ma, . . I again lost fnypfesenceoi mind. , . 
I let go of the rofw." 

So rfQw you are forewarned !* I came 
across this gem in the Kansas City DX As- 




1 



lfoy<f W6KG and iris W6QL CoMn accept their 9H2QL iicense in the office of the Minister 
of Communicetions in Kuwait. 



soclat Ion's newsletter. WOFra column, 
T^e Pfeachers Corner, credits the Ster- 
ling-Rock Falls newsletter. Anyone know 
the author of this delighlful piece? 

Seriously, antenna and especially tow- 
er work is dangerous stuff Even a task as 
simple as changing the cook to Ihe anten- 
na can lead lo Ufe-lhreat&ning corise> 
queivces. So take a tittle ejirri-tf care the 
next time you climb your tower. Remem* 
be^ , the secret to OX success is longevity, 
not hardware. Uve to Ox anotheT day" 

Some of you have asked what hap- 
pened to the DX column the last two 
months. A fierce relapse of the same 
pneumonia whtch curtailed my African 
DXpedrtion to 911 CA, C5AAQ, and 
eW8MM laid me low recefilly. Sorry about 
not being able to write tfve columns » and 
thanks for your cards and notes Tiltry to 
have some eiftra-special column a in th« 
feat of Ihe year. 

NOTES FROM ALL OVER 

Tahiti F0§ OFd you work Jay or Jan 
O'Brien W6G0 and KeHHD while they op- 
erated Irom Tahiti in 1982? The husband 
and wife team facl<ed up nearly 9000 con- 
lacia In their two-week stay in FOU last 
October, sponsored in pari by Ihe Interna^ 
tiof>al DX Foundation, About half of the 
team's contacts were with stateside sta- 
tions, and another quaner of their QSOs 
came out of Japan. Ten meters wa$ their 
most productive band, producing about 
hatf of their contacts. The 9000 contacts 
mc^uded I^Scouniries^ The O'Briens sur- 
vived a misplaced antenna and 1P&kph 
wmds durmg their DXpedition. Jay writes. 
"Nad we not lost our 40- and aO-meier an- 
tennas to the winds, our totals [on these 



bands) would be higher, as this Is where 
the demand exists/' Jay and Jan made 
more than 4000 contacts In the CO WW 
SSB contest. 

QSL cards tor FOOOJ (QSL via Jan 
K6HHDJ and FO«UO {QSL via Jay WSGO^ 
have been sent out in answer to cards re- 
ceived- If you haven't received yours yel, 
try another card. Incidentally. Jay and 
Jan, who publish a imt of OSL managers. 
The W6GOm6HHD UsL^l their FOd call- 
signs reversed in she advance pubiicity 
Uo problem; OSt either call Itirouf h Box 
TOO, RIO Linda CA 9S6n, 

Uoyd W6KG and tri s WSOL Gotvin made 
another Yasme-backed OKpedition this 
past year, hitting, arriong other places, 
Saudi Arabia, Oaiar, and Kuwait. They 
report: 

Seadt Ambia Ml '-We visited htZtTA 
and HZITC in the capital of Riyadh^ which 
is a large modern city, ft i^s unusual In ttiat 
II is noi uncommon to 3«« stores closed, 
with many items that they sell left in front 
of the store unguarded Also, stores can 
occasionally be found qpen wifh'no atten- 
dant present. One ree&On for this i$ that 
the people are very religious, and second- 
ly, if a thief is caught, hia hand is cut oft! 
We aiso visited HZlAB In Dhahran There 
are 30 operators therei and they agreed to 
let us make a Yasme DXp«ditlon for the 
two days of the ARRL Internet >onal CW 
DX ContesL 19-20 February. 1963. We 
made some l&OO QSOs in that period^ 
with four of the regular operators helpirig. 
All QSLs tor HZlAB tor these two days 
should go lo Yasme, PO Box 2025. Castro 
Valley CA 94546," 

Kuwatl 9K2 'Our nevt stop was Kuwait. 
wtiece we were extremely fortunate to re- 




Jay W6GO/FOBJ0 tfi$ tails the tritmnder af Moor&s. 



J3n KGHHQ/fO§QJ made nesriy fSOO GGntaci^ during her stay ^ TmhUi, 



116 73 Magazine • July, 1983 



celve th» special caN 9K2QL This is J he on- 
ly special calit issued to visiting amateurs lii 
a long wHite^ The first few days we stay^ at 
tho Marrtotf HoteL whU:h 1$ a converteci 
(x;ean tirwr. similar to the Queen f^ary in 
Lono Beach TTie pcobkefn of {^peraiirvg 
Ihmt w&s thai Wit portholes could not be 
opened and there was no way to get (he 
coax line into the stateroom. Wa finally 
moved to one ol the chalets neafby. We 
convinced the mai^ager thai our 3^lemeni 



beam would be a desirable addition to the 
swimming pook and garden area ot his 
S-star Hotel! We made 6500 contact? vvith 
amateurs in 135 countries from 9K2QL" 
Oarar *Oaiar ts stmilaf to Oman be- 
cause ^t ^s a recently rich oil count jy with 
tremendous new eit panslon. Although the 
treat men t of women here is more liberal 
than In the past, only appro^imaiely &% of 
the people seen on the streets Of ^n the 
restaurants of the modem city of Doha are 



women. The biggest supermarket in town 
has one day set aside just for women and 
Ihetr tarn i lies. It is not feh appropriate to 
have single men and slnrgEe women go 
shopping together! 

'For the first time 6vif» we operated 
from a skyscraper building. 0%\f antennas 
were located on top ot a 14-5toTy hotel 
wilh a perfectly clear vf9W in all difec- 
rions. The great height seemed to hetp us 
both on transmission and reception; we 



averagwl consistently about two QSOs 
per minute while on the &if. In three weeks 
ot operating^ we made 3000 QSOs with 
amateurs in 135 countries, on both 3SB 
and CW, 10-40 meters. 

^'Visiting personnel of all kinds, espe- 
cially rad^io amateurs, are not eficou raged 
to visit in the Arabian countrias. We are 
extfemely grateful to Mike A71AD who 
has helped us enter artd operate in several 
Arab countries." 



CORRECT/ONS 



The ttne photographs in my article "Build this Classic Transmiiier" m rhe May, 1963. 
issue were takeh by Steve Finberg WiGSL It is with regiet that I notice due credtt was in- 
advertently omttted from the published article. 

Penn Glower W1 BQ 
Ahdover MA 



Sagrnent d 

Segment e 

Segment f 

Segment g 

SegmenI D.P. 

Scan rate 
Scan reset 
DP. clocif 
No nanve 



IC2M3 toCONN-13 

IC^t.9toCONN^l2 

IC21-6 toCONN-11 

1C21*2 to CONN 10 

lC^l3toCONN9 

IC6-15 to *Cl-39 (1 kH2l 
ICKHi to ICt'i C20HZ} 
IC2'7 lo IC1B-1 (too kHzj 
IC35-7 to GNO 



IC5l'l3toH2^4 
H2-13 toCOlMN.13 
IC21-9 to H2-S 
HM2toCONN-12 
IC21^ to H2'6 
H2'11 toCONN-11 
IC2V2 to H2-7 
H2'i0toCOr*r*'i0 
tC25-l3 to H2^ 
H2-0 to CONN-9 
IC2-7tolCi'3a(l00kHi) 
iC6-lSiDlCt-1 (1 kHaj 
iCa-tS to JCtfrt (1 MHzJ 
IC20-6 to IC35-7 
IC27-4 to IC20^3 



In the time since publication of "ContessJons ot a Counter Evolutionary/* \n the 
August and September, 1982. issues ot 73, several errors have come to my attention. 
Some corrections were Hsted in I he October, 1982, Issue on page 142. The following Is a 
NsT of the remaining known corrections: 

Table 1: ICID-ll goes to IC1 t, not ICt'30, 

Fig, 7: IC10*11 shoutd be 20 Hz to IC1-1. not 50 Hz. 

Fig. 7: IC3 Is actually wired as 102-7 to rC3-t4. IC3-12 to IC3-1, and 103-11 to IC5-15. 

Fig. t1(a): IC24^ to JC13^ is correct, but (he connector is not "E" Dciete ^'E''. 

Fig. 13 "PM ■ IC23^ conneciS only io lCt4-t2. not to 1036-1 and not to 1023-12- 

Fig. 13: Gate omitted Irom schematic: 



ICZ3-I0 [M 




IC36-I 



Bg. 16: 1036-1 should not connect to ' PM"\ but to IC20-6, as above. 

PJg, 16: Input to ICIS-I should be 3C3-14, not 101-3. 
Fig 23: IC13 is a 74C74, not a 4013. 

Part I. page 1 07, column i J rne 1 1 reads; "A 50kHz signal is picked otf the TBQD chain/* 
Reptace *ith: "A lOO-kHi signal is picked off the TBOD chain. Because Ihe sate control 
Circuit, Fig. t l(a}, operates on a 50% duly cycle^ the lOO-kHz signal becomes, in effect, a 
50^ Nz clock; 

1^4^1,2.3 is an unused gate. 

TTmnks lo WAlCST/7 and K2SHL tor pointing out several of the above enOfS. 

Display 'Scan Modification 

Alter a yeai ot heavy use. the prolotype WA2FFr counter blew a 75491 segment driver 
chip. It was replaced, but the ne* one tabled after only a tew weeks. I f^iscovered em- 
piricaHy thai Texas Instrumenis brand 75491 devices work more rel rably m the pubNshed 
display scan circuit (see part I. page t05. Fig, 9) than National or ITT chips. 

Sound eng^nearlng design practice should minimize such vendor dependency for cir- 
cuit relfabilliy, so I relented and added eight tOOhm, 1/4-W resistors, each In series with 
one of the eight segment Jinea to limit the currant from ttie 75491 segment drivers, IC21 
and IC2&. 

The resistors are mounted on a DIP header, socketed directly below IC35 and 
designated H2. See pan II, page 52, Fig. 23. The resistors are mounted like this: 



IS IS 14 f3 12 



II 10 



M M M M 



Here are the wiring changes iof the displav-sean modilication 



SiGH At 
Segment a 

Segment b 

Segment c 



iC2S9 to CONN-16 
IC2S-6toCONN't5 
JC25-2toC0NN 14 



MODtftCATtON 
IC25 9 to H2 1 
H2 tfiloCONN fa 
IC25^ to H2'2 
HM5 toCONN-15 
IC252 to H2-3 
H2-14 toCONN-14 



Tfie tast four wiring changes altered the originat scan display cycle 10 eliminate the 
fO-Hz flicker. The 'no name " signal change resulted in the addition of another gate to 
Fig. 16- 

4 



IC27-4 [r> 




IC3S-7 



Thank you for the favorable resportses. if there a^e other errors Or problems "en- 
countered," pfease wirife and l will make every effort to resolve them 

D. N. CN^ck} EIII& WA2FPT 

ST Memorial Ave, 

Alice Springs NT 5750 

Australia 



Jul 



hMq 



SATELLITES 









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73 Magazine * July, 1983 117 



NEIV PRODUCTS 



ELECTRONIC SOLDERING 
SYSTEM 

The ne* Electronic System 9CNXJ tein- 
perarufe-control^flci scrf<termg sv^t^rn 
from ttii Ungar Dtvlsion ot Eldoo tndua^ 
tries onataies 3 Up tempefalura to be 
varjad from 420 to 9O0 degrees F wlih an 
accuracy ot :± 10 degrees- 

Scl id-st ate c i r c u( t ry j n cl u dmg m I c roci r- 
cuit chips, £arnples the up temperature 
120 TJines per second. LEDs tm the tern- 
p«rature-cont roller mstantly displav^^ch 
S&d^ree tempefmure mcrement reached, 
creating an Illuminated bar chaft that 
cfearly represents the tip terrfporature to 
within ± 10 degrees P. 

Ungar's recenlly announced Thermo- 
duric heating elemenl. \ivhjcti com- 
bines a highly eUicient healer and serisi 
tive ti^hiemperalure sensor, recovers tip 
temperature aftef each sofder joint in less 
Itian ofie-ha^t the time of othef systerfis 
Th9 smaller tieatmg element also makes 
possible a micro handle Ihat is cooler 
than other modets^ 

Electronic clrCLiMfy In the ccntrollerpfe- 
vents iip-temperaiure overshoot thai 
could easily cause teuity sotdor joints. 

The controt^r can be calib^aied by a 
front-panel adjustment usm^ room tem- 
E^rature as a reference For uitra-pfecise 
soldering, any temperature within the 
temperature range can be calibrated to be 
accurate within ± 5 degrees F. 

Following The rnodjlar concept of Un- 
gar irons, the conifoller is separaie Irom 
th« soldering If on holder assembly. The 
controller can be mounted on a wall, side 
ol a be^nctn, or other convenient local *Ofi. A 
tray, useful for holding parts or small 
tools, is exposed on the stand when the 
contfollef is removed. The iron holdef can 
quickly be changed to Ihe left or right side 
of the stand. 

The system Is electrically conductive 
from the tip to a grounded wall plug to prs- 
veni static electricity damage lo microcir- 

CMitS 

Further m formation is avattapte horn 
Ung^r, tOff W. Mtn^ifte St , Com^ton CA 
§Q22Q:{2t3}-774*^9^. In Canada: BMon In- 
du&frtes of Canada, Matkftsm, Qnt L3R 
1H5, C0nati^;f4i6H^5S4O7. Reader Ser- 
vice number 483. 



CONTROL CHIP 

Digiial Mlcrosystemi, Irvc^. a Massa- 
chusetts&a&ed firm which has been ac- 
tive m the microGomputeir and so h ware 
business for severt years, has announced 
a family of custom-integrated ctrcyltfi 
aimed prlmBrlly at the amaleur and hobby- 
ist markets. The Integrated circuits make 
use of the latest in sophisticated targe 
Scale 1nt«gra!ion (LSI) technology Each 
a desigrhed to^ be tailaf«d to its appiica^ 
lion by trie user through a wide range &f 
programmable teatures Tha first product 
to be announced is a single-chip repeater 
control circuit designed to meet amateur 
and Industrial needs for low cost, high re- 
liability, and high performance control of 
repeater stations The new chip wHi be of- 
fered iniUalty in commercial and extended 
temperature versions. A full military de- 
vice IS planned. 

Ttie single-ct>i|> rep^ter controi fea- 
tures cry^stal-controlled timing accuracy 
for ID. tailr and tirne-out timere. The pen&d 
of each timer Ib programmable by the 
user. In addition, each chip features an 
audio generator tor generating the repeat 
er station's call sign as well as several 
useful control messages such as TEST' 
and "PF " The chips aie 9f|uipped to inter- 
face difecMy with PL decoders and also 
feature a PL enabJe mpiiL 

A{tdi1ional features include a titne input 
tor holding the transmitter on while mak- 
ing adjustments, a ■"force ID" inpul for 
manual trigger ol an ID sequence, user-se- 
lectable Morse code transmission rates, 
and compatibility with a planned auto- 
patch controllei. 

For additional intormatfon, contact Dig- 
ttat Mic/osys ferns, inc^ 6Q7 SuHbt/ry St.. 
Msribom MA 0J752, Reader Service nom- 
ber 484. 




C&ntraf chip trpm Dtgtfaf Microsystems, 
tnc. 




Eisctrontc sofdermg system (ram Ungar. 

IIS 73 Magazine * July. 1983 



HEiL TRANS VERTER 

A unique 2-m«ier-lo-ieKflieier linear 
translator has betn introduced by Hell, 
Ud. Thcs new product aifows a transceiver 
covering UAW lo 146,00 to transmit and 
receive from 28,00 lo 2970 MHz. The 
translator is limited to a tWait inpul 

The model 210 is primarily designed for 
use in the ^B.dO^ioZQ.lQ-hAHz FM mobile 
t>artd, usiirjg a i-Wati tiandie-ialKie or mo- 
bile transceiver for excitatforr. but it is 
also usable on SSB« CW, AM; and RTTY by 
ejjciting with an all-mode 2-nietfir rig. The 
model 210 has three SO -239 connectors 
on the rear panel— a2-meier I^Watt inpul. 
a 2-meler antenna, and a 10-meler anten^ 
na With the front-pane^ function switch in 
ttre Out position, the 2-meier antenna is 
connected to the 2'meter transceiver or 
handie-talkie. Switching to the in pcs^imn 
will cause the trans verier to operate and 
produce a signal irvthe ^CMneter band. The 
receive sensitivity is .3 uV lor 10 dB 
quieting. The output power Is appro^ii- 
mately 4 Watts out ai 2B3Q MHz. 

For more information, contact tteit 
Sound, Ltd., Heii imSostriat Blvd. M^rtss^ 
IL 62257, Reader Service numt^ct 4B0 



AUTOPATCH AND DTMF 

DECODER MODULES 

Hamtronics' recently relt-u;.i.-iJ I wo new 
modules to complement their line of VHP 
and UHF repeaters. The Autopatch Mod- 
ule provides full telephone patch and re- 
verse autopafch functions for a repeatei 
Of duplet rural radiotelephone insialia- 
tion. tn addition, ii allows pnmary repeat- 
er control via phone line and secondary 
control Via tr;^ repeater receiver, and it mh 
lows a control operator to monitor the re- 
peater receiver by telephone even when 
the transmitter is shut off. 

The Autopatch features a choice of e^ 
thef automatic answer or on-ait tone ring- 
ing wfien a party calls Ihe reverse patch 
furvction fl also features automatic levef 
limiting, timeHOut timer, tape-feceivef re- 
lay For logging, and access-code-tone 
muting for security. 

The DTMF DecoderController Module 
can be used with Ihe Autopatch, or it can 
be used a^one tor control ot repeaters and 
other devices by radio ImK It has outputs 
to control two on/off functions mdepeo- 
den 1 1 )r. Typically, it is used to contfot a re- 
pealer and autopatch, thit ttwre are many 
other remoteHi^onlrol |obs H can perform 
In radio, industrial, mining, and scientific 
applications. The decoder useaa fDur-dig- 
it DTMF code, and several safely features 
are provided tor security against falsing 
or tampering. The unit is all so I id -St ale (no 
relays) and u^es commonly available iCs, 

For more information, ask tor Auto- 
patch Qms Sheet and a complete free cat- 
alog includmg mformation on rransmil- 
ters. receivers, converters, repeaters, etc . 
contact Hamtfomcis. frtc. (55 f Moai ftd. 
Hiiton NY U46S-9535: {776}-392'9430. [For 
overseas mailing, please enclose $1 or 4 
JRCs.) I^eader Service number 4S2. 



TVRO RECEIVER 

A TVRO recei^ier was fntroduced recently 
at the Satellite TV Trade Show by GiHas^ 
pie and Associates, Inc., of Sunnyvale, 
California. The Gillespie 9600 oompietes 
the manufacturer's uniquely designed 
SIX 'foot system package— the Hrst in the 
industry to otter a combination of opil' 
mLzed components that are each clearly 
de f med and made to wo rk with eac tt other 

The receiver intraduces several new 
features, including an infrared remold- 
control channel selector, customer 
oriented controls, built-in polarity swrtch* 



mg and tuning, and state-of-the-art vioeo 
demodulation circuttfy, lis destfn in- 
cludes a walnut wood cabtnet 

Gillespie and Assoc rates, fnc.„ expects 
to Oe able to manufacture 10,000 to 20,000 
receiver units a month by |he end of 19S3 
The product will be distrltiiuled Ihrough 
the company's e?cclusive distributors— 
North American Satellite Antenna in Fres- 
no. California. Nevada Satellite in Las 
Vegas, htevada, Sateitue Communica- 
tions Corporation in Silver Lake, Kansas, 
and Miilirvision in Oak Redge, Tennes- 
see—and a network of 800 dealers. 

For additional information, contact G//- 
iaspie and Associates, tnc, J65San A/eso 
Ave.. Sunny vafe CA 94086; (408^703-2^00 
Reader Service number 40&. 



HFA/HF ANTENNA LINE 

TervTec. Inc.. tne amateur/commercial 
radio transceiver manufacturer of Sevier- 
ville, Tennessee, has just announced ac- 
quisition of the Basset I antenna Ur\&. The 
new Ten-Tec antenna line includes tK>1h 
muittband ti^ed-station and single- band 
rrKibile antennas. 

The ftxed-s!atK>n trapped dtpoie anten- 
nas are offered in 13 models of two. three, 
four, and five band systems covering 10 
through 75 meters. All models use helium- 
niled traps and baluns, stainless steel 
hardware, and copperweld wire. Each 
model operates as a fundamental broad^ 
i^ide dipole, band change is automatic, 
and no tuner is re^ju^red to achieve vswr of 
1.&:1 or less. Power ratings are 2 kW PEP 

The singlfl^band mobile whip antennas 
feature helical inductors sealed tn helium- 
tilled lower Sections with siainiess-sieei- 
top whups. Models are available lor all 
bands from 2 through 75 meters. Average 
weight is |ust 6 oz,, yet they remain verti- 
cal and resonant at all highway speeds 
and are impervious to weather. Power rat- 
ings are ?50 Watts P£P. 

Accessories include a single-hole %B' 
fiberglass Mobile Deck Mount and a non^ 
induclive 5-band switchabfe Mobile 
Male her to match 3^30- MHf mobile anien- 
nastoSO-Ohnncoax, The tsalun. which fea^ 
tores a helium-filled high-efficiency air 
core rated to 5 KW PEP. is also available 
separateiy. as are the helium traps for 30 
meters- 

The new acouisition also permits Ten- 
Tec to supply custom con^merciai mobile 
and fixed- SI at K>n antennas. 

For complete informal ion, write Fen- 
fee, tnc.. SeviGntifle TN 378S2; (61 5h 
453^7172 



SWISS QUAD FOR METERS 

TET Antenna Systems anruuinces its 
model SO-ei . The Sw^ss Quad is a i wo^le- 
ment quad wdh txjth elements driven. Thne 
elements and the phasing line tsetween 
them are made of aluminum tuhing. The 
larger diameter of Ihe tubing gives Im* 
proved bandwidth over conventional wire- 
element quads. The elements are aeif- 
supporting^ thus eliminating the usual 
support structure. This makes a lighl* 
weight antenna with low wind resistance 

The gain i^ highier than a S'^i'lemenr yagi, 
but the turning radius is halt thatof a yagi. 
It is ioeai when space is restricted. Soih 
elements have trombone sections so they 
are easy to tune to lavor any part of Ihe 
hand. Both elements are grounded to the 
tkoom, giving Static discharge and lightning 
protection. The feed system matches 
50Ohm coamiar cable witriout need fof a 
t>aiun. 

For funhef information, contact T^T 
A/itennB Systems, 1942£ W. Misst&n fload, 
Escontfido CA 9^055, Reader Service num- 
ber 477. 




Veesu's FJ-?26f^ multimod^ transcffiv€r, 




FT 726R TRIBAND 
MULTi MODE TRANSCEIVER 

Yaesu El&cuomcs. Corporal ion has an- 
nounced the availaDitity oi th« FT-72&R, 
I he vraild^ fir^t amateur HFA/HF/UHF 
iranscerver capable of full duplex opera- 
ttoh for aalelllt^ work. 

The basse FT'726fl comes equJpped for 
S-meier operation on SSB, CW^ and FM, 
Optional jnitsmay then DeplugS'edm, en- 
abhrg operation on 10 or 6 meier&, 
43(M40 or 440-450 MH? on 70 cm, The op- 
tlor^ai 5U-276 Satellite Unit allows cross- 
band full duplex opefation, for simu^iane- 
ous uplmk transmit and downlink receive 
operation on amaieur satelMies 

Com roiled by an eigh1-bc1 microproces- 
sor, trie fT-72eR features a duii vto plus 
memory frequency management system, 
with independent frequency^mode stor- 
age on each vto or memory; mode invert- 
ing satellite transponders are therefore 
covered with ease. The transmii and re- 
ceive frequencSes may be varied during 
sateilite wofl« to atlow easy zero-t>eal ca- 
pabttity while following Ooppler shift. 

Equipped With many teaiures foun^i onty 
Oh HF t ran S4^ei vers, the FT'726II ir^cludes 
an SSB sp^^ch processor. M shift, varia- 
ble i'f bandwidth tuning, i-f noise blanker^ 
RIT, multl-rrjode squelch, and a receive 
audio lone control. A CW filter, DTMf en- 
coding microphone {YM-4&), desk micro- 
phone {^^D- IBS), external speaker iSP-102). 
and CTC3S units are all available as 
options. 

For more details about the FT-726R, 
com act faesci £/ecfronics Cofp.. PO &ox 



49. Paramount CA 9Q723; f2J3h63:^-40Q7. 
Reader Service number 479^ 

TEST LEADS 

Two test lead sets have recenlly been 
placed on the market by Non Linear Sys- 
tems. Inc. They €on$ial of fle^Jble silicone 
rubber leads, 48 inches in length, with a 
rated working vDltage of tOOO volts ac rms 
and a maximum of 10 Amperes, 

Each type is terminated at oneer^d with 
Insulated St a in less- si eel prods which may 
bo exten<sed by rrwre than two mches. Ex- 
tension, retraction, or locking the pfods is 
easily aco^mplished by fotating a knurled 
ring on Ihe protie from left to right Testing 
in remote circuM areas rseasy ttirough the 
extendable-prod' feature. 

P/N 5M€D lest leadB are terminated at 
the other end with standard banana plugs 
for use with the NLS Touch Test 20 aerres 
digital multimeters or other instruments 
with standard banana-plug receptacles. 
P/N 39-395 te^t lea<ls are terminated with 
mint banana plugs for use witfi NLS LM- 
type meiers. 

Both sets of test leads are available na- 
tiortwide from local fsiLS electronics dis- 
tributors. Foraddiiional information, con- 
tact NotJ Ufrear Systems, Inc., PO Box N. 
Del Mer CA 92014, Reader Service num- 
ber 478. 

RECEIVER MULTICOUPLER 

Two Shortwave receivers may be oper- 
ated from one antenna. tttanNs to a new 
mutticoupte^r just released byOfove Enter- 



New tmi h»^i from Nqh Linear Systems, 



prises, manufacturer of accessorias for 
listening, 

The CPL-2 muificoupier acts as a signal 
splitter, providing equai signal levels to 
two receivers simultaneously from one 
antenna- 
Design^ for fiat respon&e from 3^30 
MHz, the inexpensive splittef comes 
equipped" with interconnect in g cablet and 
adapters for different types of lead-in 
connections. 

A scan ner verison of t he mull Icoupler IS 
also available as model CPL-1. 

For further Information, contact Gmve 
Enterprfse&, 140 Dog Branch Road, Brass- 
town NO 28902: f80QH3S-8J55 fexcept 
NCJ. In NC, call f704J-S3 7-221 6 Reader Ser- 
vico number 47B= 




aO-METER ANTENNA COIL 

Microwave Filter Company has re- 
leased its KW-30 antenna coil which al- 
lows trapped dipolo coverage of the new 
30-mflter band. The resonant frequency Is 
designed to provide a perfect half-wave di- 
poie. The KW-30 s power handling capa- 
bility is2 kW PEP, and line tensile atrengtti 
IS iOO iHMmds, An acfytic lacquer wafer- 
proof coatir^g and afi-a!ummum haj'dware 



Micwwave Fiffer Company's 3O-met0ran- 
tsnns cqH 

help to resist interface corrosion on the 
5.5 'X Le'coiL 

For additional m format ion,, contact Mf> 
cft>w^v0 Ftfter Campaffy, fnc 6743 tttftne 
SU £a$t Syracuse NY 13(^7: {8QQy44&' 
T666 Reader Service number 481. 



REI^IEM^ 



VHffUHF MANUAL 

Well, o^d ctiap. brew up a spot of tea 
and settle in youf easy chair. The VHf/UHF 
Manuai IS here from the Radio Society of 
Greai Britain, and quite a good read it Is. 

Edited by G.R. Jessop G6JP, this is the 
fourth edition of the manual, and It Includes 
the latest m theory and circuits tot the mod- 
Bfn experimenter's paradise. TBe booK runs 
lo a healthy 52B paQes, wtiich ts somewhai 
iarger than the last edition. Subjects range 
ftwn propagation to space communica^ 
l^Bfii, hiltifig tuned oJf cults, antennas, end 
test equipment along the way. 

The authors begin the book with a ger- 
mane pofnt— that VHF/UHF communica- 
tions Is no longer the arcane art that most 
amateurs believe il to be. indeed, they 
suggest that tho^e frequencies provided 
tfie backtxine of some of Marconi's eajll- 



est experiments, and that In 1fl24, tHe 
magnetron made 900-MH2 oscillation 
possible. 

By the '30s. ttie basic tecftnlques for 
these frequencies had been developed, 
and since that time, the progress of soild- 
state equipment has provided a more 
comfortable environment for VHF/UHF 
eKpeiimentatJon, And with the p roll f era- 
lion of 2-rTteler eqylfsment^ there is no 
longer any excuse for amateurs not to 
know ttieir way around the larified atmo- 
sphere of 144 MHz and above. 

The chapter on propagation leaves no 
stone unturned In tts coverage of the 0(ld 
twists and turns of VHF/UHF signals. 
Sines propagation here is dependent on 
the troposphere rather than the iono- 
sphere, meteoroiofy comes into play 
when attempling to understand how the 



VHF Signal travels. For those not familiar 
with the ways in which weather is studiedn, 
appropriate concepts such as dew point, 
adiabatic changes, and vapor pressure 
are eicptained, with particular attention 
paid to their effect on communications. 
Ttie more bizarre forms of propaga- 
tion— sporadic-E, meteor trail, and auror- 
al— also are explained, usinQ current 
theoiy. 

Fortunately for the reader, tti^ authors 
make frequent u^& of visual aids and in- 
clude real-wortd examples. Tbis is an attri- 
bute I noticed throughout the book. Draw- 
ings are frequenliy provided in conjunction 
with the schematics, providing better 
insight. 

The manual rs not all theory, Ivoweven 
in subsequent sections, some good old 
down-to^arth construction pfotecis are 
descritied. The construction-onented 
chapters make up the bulk of the book^ 
and they cover receivers and transmftters^ 
converters^ filter, microwaves, and test 
equipment. The authors' selection of cir- 
cuits runs a wide range, from timeout tim- 
eis and simple tube converters to synthe- 
sized 2-metef equipment. 



With Ihe continent's generally mere 
stringent regul at Ions concerning EMi, the 
Circuits cited in the manual are consid* 
ered to be fairly clean designs. As a home- 
brewer, i was also concerned about the 
availability offoreign components used in 
the Circuits. But most of ttiose included in 
the manual use standard European r>o- 
menclature for transistors, and a convei- 
sion chart can quickly give you the US 
equivalent. And regardiess of where you 
are, an Ohm Is still an Ohm, 

Other pfojecls offered include SSB 
equipment, ATV signai processors, and 
144-IVlHz amplifiers. 432 MHz gear Is also 
well represented, but because of the Euro- 
pean focus of the book, relatively few op- 
portunities for me 220-9AHT buff p^eseni 
themselves. 

The manual^s treatment of antennas, the 
last refuge of the expeftmenteron a tNJdgeL 
IS equal pafls theory and construction; 
some sound design parameters are of fared, 
but you ^(B not likely to find any radical de- 
partures from tradition here. 

Space communications, which may 
prove to be this decade's mode (as 
2-me1er FM was In the 70is>, has been 



73 Magazine • July, 1983 t19 



sofTwwhal slighted as i**et». The manual 
tras provided ihe tiasic inlomiaUQn on tin- 
dersiariding. tracking, ami designing am- 
atetif ftat&iihte&. bui ittti^ about me nuts 
end bolts of designing ytiur own sataMite 
station TottTBif cre6ii. theauihors mclud- 
id yp-t«Hiate information wn Phase tit, arwj 
ttveFiptdly changing lace of satellite com- 
mirnications may tvave forced the authora 
to be sparmg in Ih^if suggesiions. 

M Don bounce has t>een relegated to a 
mere two pages of text— which is exactly 
where Jt heJongs, tor few hams have the 
rrOFiey, space, or lime to fiddio wuh the 
demanding requirements of EME. 

Overall, this book j9 a winner, whether 
yoii want to homebrew your own VHF^ 
UHF gear or just understand what goesorr 
tnslcte your btack boii. And aa proof posi- 
tive mat this tKJok la In tune with the 
limes, many of the otd tube circuits haire 
tseen left in. No contfadiction here; 
according to the editor, tubes are about 
1Q0 limes less susceptible to damage 
tfOin EMP radiation^ which it one of the 
by^ptoducis of an atomic eaptoaioni- 

Fof m-ore mformatmn, contact the R3- 
aio SoCt^ty ^f Great Britain. 35 Oovghty 
Su tontton WCtN 2AE, EnglarJ^^ Reader 
Strvice number 488- 

Avsry L. Jankins WB8JLG 

73 Staff 



WHAT DO yoa THINK? 

Hate you recenlly purchased a new product that has b#en revfewed In 73? It 
you have, wfite and teil us what jro^ittimkatiouUt. 73 willpublisti your commune 
so you can shafe inem w^th Other hams, as part ol our conlSnulng men to bring 
you the best in new product mlomiation and reviews. Sifwl your tnou^hts to 
Beview Editor. /3: AmaWitr fladio s T^nmcaf JoumMi, Paterborouflh NH 03458. 



GORDON WEST CODE TAPES 

The coftcept ot using tapes to teach the 
code Is almost as old as the Morse code 
Itself. ar»d almost all ot the variations of 
tepe^aughi code hava been tried, I 
thought I had seen (htm att until t en^ 
couniefed Gordon Wes! a Radio School 
code cassettes. 

Gordon West WB4M0A has managed to 
tome up witti a new idea— his tapes are m 
stefeo. wfth orte channel COt^SJ;sting only 
of code and the other channel containing 
a voice translation of what is being sent. 
Ttiis is an mten&slmg idea, pari ictiiarty tor 
the beginning studeni wtio needs to know 
II he IS getting hi& chaiacters slraighL 

The lapes I reviewed are tor the first- 
time student who has no knowledge of the 
code. The four tape series \s divided Into 
an equal number of ^O-mlnute "modules/^ 
each representing a higher level of 
achievement {or difficulty, depending on 
how you look at it J. The first two modutes 
Introduce the student to all of the letters, 
numbefS, and punctualton marks in com- 
mon usage. The remaining modules woi^ 
toward reinforcing the previous lessons. 
West tjegtns lesions by introducing a 
tew new chafaclers. repeating them sev- 
eral t*mes. and then sending a series of 
the new characters on or*e channel while 
Identifying them in voice on ttic second 
Chan net. The purpose Ol the stereo is to 
allow you to listen to the code only and 
then go back and check your copy. Or, on 
your first round through that lesson, you 
can listen to both cfianneis until you feel 
confider^t with the new cheraciers being 
introduced. 

Each lesson works gradually into more 
complex sequences As moie characters 
are introduced ^ the strings of letters t>e- 
come words and then ^ntences. Ttie 
longer strings and sentences are not si- 
muuafieousiy translated on the voice 
channel tnstead. West identifies the end 
of each string wtth a p««iod. This marker 
lellfl you to turn up the omer channel for 
the voice iransiation ot what was bemg 

senl. 

Be I ween Wessons, West identifies pos- 
sible trouble spots and offers Ifps to help 
beginners learn the code. From the sound 
and inf lection of his voice, H Is obvious 
that West has had broadcasting or an- 
nouncing experience, His voice le easy to 

120 73 Magazine • July, 1983 



listen to and the script is delivered in an 
Informal, ctiatty manner. 

The tapes may also be played on a mon- 
aural system. The only difference wHI be 
Ihai bolh channels will be played and you 
cannot blank out the voice-over as you 
can with a stereo cassette dock. 

However this compatibility with tooth 
mono and stereo systems is aieo one of 
tne tapes' drawbacSts Since nol all of tne 
practice sessions are simultaneously re* 
peated on the voice channel, the advan- 
tages of the stereo capability ai e not used 
to full advantage. Thtoughout much of the 
tape, tne only difference t>etween the 
West tapes and a standard mor>o tape is 
that you have to turn up ttie volume ot one 
channel to caich ttie answers lo the prac- 
tice session, 

After several hours ot use on both 
stereo and mono tape players, I found t hat 
it was almost easier to listen to the tapes 
on the mono cassette player. The advan- 
tage to the separate cfiannels occurs 
primarily when new letters are being in- 
troduced. 

Another aspect of the West *yatem 
wtiich I did not like was the use of words 
and sentences. Unless random code 
groups are used, it becomes loo easy to 
memorize the ct^aracters being sent 
rather tnan imprtive your recogniHion. 
Alter only a tew tiiais on the tape< I could 
predict witn fair accuracy the upcoming 
characters. Granted. I was not trying to 
leam the code at the same time, but the 
same process would occur at a slowej 
rate with s beginning student 

West uses the standard system oi 
leaching the code, beginning with the 
easiest characters such as I and e and 
progressing to the more dlfficuli ones, 
Repeiltlon—lhe key to succeealul mem 
oriiation— la used to great ad van i age 
here However, he does not send the char- 
acters themselves at a higher speed so 
that the stucfent can get used to the sound 
of the code at to or t5 iwpm. Time and 
again, It has been shown ttiat this tech- 
nique provides the best results because 
the student does not have to reiearn the 
code each lime he or she advances in 

I did not find that there were any clear 
advantages to West & stereo syslem. The 
tapes are professionally produced, and 



West tiaa paid a lot ol attention lo tfie 
psychoiogtcat factors of learning. His 
breaks are well-timed to coincidB wllti the 
length of time most people can concen- 
trate^ and his Informal manner to a certain 
ejttent avercomas ttie impersonality of 
tape-teaching 

But in his attempt to make the tapes 
compatible with both stereo and mono 
systems. West has somewhat weakerwd 
ttte effect of this novel technigue. 

West's co<Je tapes list for S39.9fi for a 
set of tout For more information, contact 
Gordon West's Radio S^hoot, 24i4 Coi 
i&ge DfJvB, Costa Mesa CA 92626: i7Ut 
549-^000 Reader Service number 486. 

Amtf L. Jenkins WBaJLG 

n Stall 

AEA'S KT-2 KEYER/TRAINER 

OK, all you would-be General- and 
Extra-ciess hams out there— you no 
longer have any excuses for not upgrad- 
ing. At least, not since the people at AEA 
camfeout with Ihelr KT-2 keyernralner. The 
KT-2 is a flexible unit which doubles as a 
cod fr practice device (CPOl and a keyer. In 
short. It will not quickly outlive its 
u&efylness. 

As quality equipmeni sttoukl b^, the 
outside of A£A s tittle black box is decep- 
tively simple* With only an on^ffhfOliiT«e 
knob and a OTMF Key^d as eatemal con- 
irois. On ma t>ack, there ar^ jacks lot 
headphones, a key, and outputs !o either 
cathode-keyed or grid-keyed transceivei^s. 
However, tfie many capahlidtes ol the 
KT-Z belle its plain appearance. 

As a training unit, the KT-2 has several 
special feature sol note to the person iry- 
ing to move his or her code speed up lo 
that elugiva 13 wpm, One of these fea- 
tures Is theopllonal use of the Farnshaw 
method o! practice. 

The Farnshaw technique has proven to 
be one of the rnost successful ways of 
(earning the code. More commonly known 
as "faffit" practice. tf»e Farnshaw style 
consists of sending the ctiaracters ai a 
fast speed— say, 15 wpm— while mam- 
tainmg a longef inter-characier spacing to 
create a lower ovetaU speed. In this way. 
the student does not have to re leam tne 
sound of the characters as he advances in 
speed- You can, inerefore. program the 




AEA'S Kr'2 keyer/irsinsr 



trainer lo send Us random codeai 10 wpm, 
wtiile keeping the character speed at 20 
wpm. Actuary J he trainef has thecapabil- 
1 1 y o I serMjing from 5 wpm to 98 wpm , with 
a characler speed of up to 99 wpm. Not 
too bad tor a tittle black tmn 

Pumping Iron 

Coupled witn this option is ttie a&itity to 
program the keyer to automatically in- 
crease the code speed during a traimng 
session. I dubtied this the '"pumping iron" 
technique since it parallels the method 
used by professional bodybuliders to de- 
velop muscles. On powar-up. the trainer 1$ 
sat to start out at 5 wpm and accelerate to 
20 wpm over 10 minutes; as workouts go^ 
that's nothing to laugh at. But Ihrougn the 
keypad, you can adjust both the starting 
and finishing speeds as well as thedura- 
tk^n otthe session. 

More programming gives you further 
options. If you prefer the trad it ion ai 
method, flitting two keys on ttie pad will 
give you tt^e code al exactly the speed you 
choose— no reduced intra-cfiafacter 
Srpacing and no acceleration. Or if, like 
me, you f>refer to listen to SO-wpm char 
aciers sent at 13 wpn^ with no speedup to 
overload you. that can be arranged, too. 

Randomize. Don*t Memorize 

Nine pseudorantiom secuences may be 
chosen, and no sequence will repeat itself 
until about 3^,000 characters have been 
sent. Even If you manage to memorize all 
Of those without bringing your code speed 
up to where you want it, AEA has provided 
an escape valve. Starting a practice ses^ 
sion with ttie "'« seQuenc© will randomly 
select your starting point. 

Tf\e length of wofd groupSi may be ran- 
dom OT 5 ctiaracters per group And if you 
realty want to get lough on yourself, the 
KT-2 is divided into two character sets- a 
cotnmoA set wtiich includes the alpnat>et. 
numerals, and sJfc frequent I jHJsed punc- 
luaiion marks, and a second set which in- 
eludes CW abbreviations and little-used 
punctuation Tf^ose with an intense des lire 
to copy apostrophes and parentheses 
wont be left out. 

Though the sequences of keys you have 
to press to program and begin the trainer 
look complex, I found Ihal I had them 
down pat after only a few sessions. None 
ol the commands take more than four key- 
strokes, and A£A thought futty provides an 
easily-used table for quick reference. 

Another advantage to using the KT-2 is 
that, unlllte onthe-air pracuce, you donl 
Itave to guess at the spee<i The KT-2 is 
calibrated to tje eitremely accurate, using 
the PARIS method. The word "PAftlS" has 
10 riots, four dashes, nine tntra-character 
spaces, four intef-charactef spaces, and 
one word Space for a total of 50 code 
elements. In adjusting code speed— for 
different dot-space and dash-space 
ratios— PA RiS is used as a reference to 
determine the actual speed of the code. 

The Keyer 

The KT-Z Is no contest Keyer, but not all 
CW buffs are contesters- and as a keyer. 
the KT-2 offers you the options you need 
moat. 

First of ati, It can be used with an tarn* 
btc paddle, a bug, ot a straight key. W*lh 
the taller two. you simply key the dash in- 
put and the KT2 produces a sidetone. As 
a full iambic keyer, ttiis unit shines. Both 
dot-space and dast^-space ratios (W«lQftt- 
ingl ere adjusiat^e from the normal 3:1. 
And when you change the weighting, the 
keyer will adiust the output automatically 
so that you wlit be sending at precisely the 
speed you sei, 

The keyer sidetone (as with the tfalnarl 
is adjustable from Its power-up frequency 
ot 1 111 Hz, and the KT-2 also has dot and 



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73 Magazine * July, 1983 121 




f 



tlash mefnorieft' The memoties atloi'v you 
to insert a tiot in i sirtng of dashfi-a Cor vfce 
versa) jusl by sque«zmg the ai>|>ropffate 
p^afixile. \Mithout ihis fedtum, yov ^moviii 
hAve to release the dash paddle, squeeze 
lhe<k>t paddle, and then key the ddsh &ide 
agam. But tf you prelef o Ed -style sending, 
you can turn Ihts Dption off. 

And lot iutiO'Up, I he keyer has a lock-on 
posit ion wlilch produces a solid lone 
while you fiddle with your finals. You can 
cancel the lone by hitting any button on 
the keypad. 

The manual foi Ihe KT'2 is ^Afelt-wrilien^ 
AEA provides an miiiai testing procedure 
to ensure ttvai your um\ is operatino cor- 
rectly, and the operating instructions afe 
clear and concise. In addition, Ihere is 
a complete schemaUc, parts iist. and PC 
boar<t layout The unit uses a 12- V syp^ly, 
find AEA set Fs a wall-plug adapter, a c i ga- 
rni le lighter CDfd. and a nicad pack to ac- 
company it. 

At Ihe list price of $l39.95i even Ted 
McEfroy would have bought the KT*a, 

For additJonai information, contact fi&- 
vAficed Elecfroffic AppHcafiQns. PO Bon 
C2160. Lfntiwootf WA 9W36, Rea^r Ser^ 
vice number 467. 

Awery L ienltins WBBJLG 

73 Staff 



CUSHCRAFT A3/A73 

TRIBANDER 

After years of holpkng to bu^ld fend use) 
other people's ham stations, I finally set* 
tied down and found a home that was 
compaiible with ham radio. It didn't take 
k)ng before a lower^ slaned gf owing in the 
backya^'d. No more senii-verticals and 
very random wires tof met 

Qui having a lower meant Ihai I had to 
find somethingi to put on top of it— audi 
monotmndefs were oui lai feast uni^i next 
year!}. I decided on tire Cushciaft A3 tri- 
band beam with an A73 40-meter add-on 
kit. The A3 is a three etemem Cieam tor to, 
15, and 20 meters, and the A73 kit adds art 
additional aet of traps and some lertgth to 
the driven aiement so that the antenna 
will work as a rotatable dipole for 40 me- 
ters. With Ihe A3^A73, I can cover four 
bands with one antenna and ieebline, and 
that makes designing an antefina fatm a 
lot easser. 

The A3 i$ a fmall antenna with ai boo^^n 
MM^h ot only 14 feel, although Ihe driven 
element twiifi the A73 kit installed) is 
alxiut 35 feet long and uses a truss and 
cord to reduce element sa§. The beam 
wen t tog et her ea si I y , an d 1 he I hst ruct lor^ s, 
which consist almost entirety of dia- 
grams, were simple to foiiow. Element di- 
mensions tor use on the CW, phone, or 
mid-band seoments are given so Ihat the 
antenna can be tuned up in your favorite 
part of the band. [ used the CW settings 
for mine. 

The wind load of the A3/A73 Is 4.94 
sqyare feet t4 i3 $q. f| H sei up Jor 30me- 
ler^lf The antenna is weU tHjift tiid shoutd 
turvive any reasonable wind. 

Affef assembly, the cmm flwo on the 
ground and WA9SRW on ttie towers hoist- 
ed the antenna up to Its final resting place 
at 70 feet without any trouble. Some quick 
SWr checks indicated that everything was 
aa It should be, and off I went to work the 
world. 

About a month after the A3 was instaliedt 
disaster struck. While operailno with a kilo- 
watt inou! on 2(Ht^ief CW, I watched with 
tiOfTor as the swr rose from its usuaJ 1 .1 to t 
up to 3 hk to 1 After letting things cool down 
a bitj irledaoainHlhislime using lOQ Watts 
oulpul. Whwi first keyed, ttie Swr was right 
where it should be, but I couJd watch ii rise 

122 73 Magazine • July, 19S3 




AG9V'& stMCk: 2 % 7'ein46 MHz Bt67\ the C^JshcnH A3 at 7Q\ and Homehr&i^ DisconetQf 
t44/220f450 at m\ {Photo by K9JOB} 



unM, after atx)ut 45 seconds. i1 was OacJ^ up 
to 3 to 1. 

A check of otfier bands showed that 40 
meters also was affected, but Ihat 10 and 
15 meiar& were not. Tftts led to the suspi* 
Oion (confirmed by a phone call to Cush- 
crattMhat I had a t? ad 40/20 -meter trap or^ 
the driven element. Analyzing ihe failure, 
it appeared that there had been an arc in 
the trap. The failure occurred on a damp, 
mifity night, and apparently the moist air 
provided the path that began the arc-over. 
Cushcratt whipped up a modified set of 
trails with increased clearances that 
sltoukJ eliminate any such problems 

Once the weather cooperated and we 
got the new traps mstalled tthese things 
always ^eem to happen in the middle ot 
winierl). everything was tjack to normal. 
Subsequent misty nights have proven to 
be no problem. Cushcrafl has imformed 
me that these modifications will be used 
in future production A3^A73s, 

Now (or the SE^.OOO question— how 
does the A3 perform? Considefing the 
compromises Ihat are inevitable m a mui- 
1 1 band beam, the answer is very wel^ 
indeed, 

Lers look SI Ihe com promises first. 
Thefe are tviro prohiems with a small, 
traoped j>eam. First, traos aren'i tOD per- 
cent efficient and ttiiey do mrroducesome 
Eoss, but more important, ihey sliorten the 
elements by adding inductance to the an- 
tenna circuit Of course, lhi$ has the ad- 
vantage of creating asmaller antenna, but 
it also means that like most ahortened an- 
tennafi. Ihe bandwidi h will be reduced and 
the swr curve wiii be sharper, 

Second the spacing between elements 
is a compromise — if the elements aren't 
too widely spaced fof 1Q met era, ihey will 
tse closely spaced for 20 meters. Ctosefy- 
spaced etemer^ts lend to reduce gam, 
fn>n| to-4D4c4t ratio. ajKJ bAndWldtti.. 

Gain artd frofit-to-Oackbar^d widths usu- 
ally gel narrower along with swr band- 
width, and panic uiarly on 20 meters, 
these measurements wont be near their 

peak values at the end of the bend away 
from where the A3 is tuned. 

These compromises most affect the 
lowest frequency band in use. and on the 
hignest band, performance shouid be very 
close to 1 ti a t D f a f uH -sire d bea m . In pract i - 
cal terms, Ihe trade-offs don't make a In- 
bander (or in Ihis case, a "quad bander") 
like the A3 an inferior performer. arKJ they 
certafhly result tn a very pracxtical antenna 
design. 



Tlte A3's swr bandwidth, most notice- 
ably on 20 and 40 meters, is much narrow 
ef titan that of a fulf-si^ed antenna, and if 
the A3 IS tuned for CW, you'd t>etter figure 
on dealing with a rather highswrat the lop 
of the phone band Qn 40 meters^ in fad, 
the 2 to 1 bandwidth is only about 1 25 kH2 
Narrow swr bandwidth itself isn1 a seri- 
ous problem unless your rig won't load in- 
to the mismatch— and that's what anten- 
na tuners are lor. Accord In. g to Cu she raft, 
the A3 will handle a futt kW if the swr at 
the antenna (and not measureb througtt a 
tran smatchi i s (ess t N an 3 to 1 . A n s wr t h at 
high should occur on.liy on 40 meters. 

in use. theASisntnoiicealtly interior to 
a lulf-sized antenna The gain on 20 me- 
ters may be a dS or two below that of a 
monobarkder^ bm it's still a lot louder then 
A dipo^eS I spend most ot my operating 
lime haunting the bottom end of 20 CW^ 
and I don't feei Ihat the A3 is a handicap, jf 
aprieupissohugethal I can't get through, 
it would take a lot more than a bigger 
antenna to make much difference. 

My CW-luned antenna does have lower 
gam and ffoni-to-back ra1*o at the top o( 
20 than at the bottom Setting the ele- 
ments to mid4iand dimensions would 
lend to even things out. but at some loss 
of CW peffbrmance This is whefe the 
monobandef has the edge, and where art 
operator demanding optimum pertor- 
mance across the entire band might be 



unhappy with the A3 or wittt any small 
in bander. 

Of course, il you gel into the battles on 
20 plvone Of 1 1 you contest in a big way, 
you'll need all the antenna you can gel. 
but I think that most of us can live quite 
nicety with an antenna likethe A3— partic- 
utarty when you consider the cost ot an A3 
and the modest tower it takes to support it 
versus the cost of a stack ol monobahd- 
ets, a huge rotor, and a heavy, guyed tow- 
er. That ultimate dB is very, very expen- 
sive! 

I haven t talked to many folks who use a 
tri bander with a 40-meier add-on » so 1 was 
very tnteresied in how the A3/A73 would 
work for DXing from the midwesi, a couple 
ol thousand miles further from the DX 
Ihan are you lucky coastal types. My other 
4g^meier antefrna is a hatf-deiia loop over 
a pretty good ground- tt seems to work 
very well, and I've worked a fair amount of 
DX with It. 

Wall, folks, the A3iA73 beats Ihe haif^ 
delta every time- It fleers les^ noise and 
seems to laik as we^l or better than the 
Other antenna The nulls off Ihe end of the 
rotatable dipc^le are very notioeabte, and it 
is possible to null out European broad- 
casters by 10 to 20 dB merely by roiaimg 
the antenna 90 degrees away from 
Europe- 

Of course, having the antennas at 70 
feel doesn't hurt any. and at a lower 
height, ihe dipole might UTell lose lo the 
hatf-deita- But in any installation, the 
A3/A73 has an advantage because it puts 
the 40-meter antenna up where it can per- 
fqrnt best. II wiij nearly always be in- 
gtaJled as high b& It possibJy can be, and 
unlJke most wire dipoles, It will be in the 
clear and away from guy wires and other 
antennas. Under these conditiorts, a di- 
pole can do an amazingly good job ort the 
lower bands, particiitarty since fewer of 
Ihe gang ate using beams on 40 meters, 

incfdentaity^ the A73 kit may also beset 
up to cover the new 30-meter band instead 
of 40, so it's an easy way to add a new 
band to your station without a to! of has* 
sle if you already have an antenna foi 40. 

The A3/A73 antenna will provide re- 
spectable performance on 40 through 10 
meters without unreasonable cost or 
compJe^lly. It's a good choice for the ham 
who has limited space and/or funds for an- 
tennas, yet who war^ts to beabieto punch 
through a piteup now am^ again. 

For further information, contact Cvsft- 
em ft Corp.. PO Bos 40B6f4B Fertm&rer 
Aerad, Msfjcheswr NH O310S Reader Ser- 
vice numbef 440. 

John Ackemiann AQSV 
Green Bay Wl 



HAM HELP 



t am mterested in settmg up a re9uiar 
sked with other hams who are interested 
In working with historical photographic 
processes such as Carbro. Bromoit, or Oil 
Transfer, 

Tracy DIers W20QK 

58-14^a4th SI. 

Elmhurstt^Y 11373 

I need a modulation tramsfomier for a 
John&on Viking Valiant transmrtter. I wii( 
gladly pay shipping. 

IfltehenSisvk 

tOtSO Man^uette St* 

Montreal Quebec 

Canada H2C 3E4 



I would like to find tfve pinouis and any 
other information qn the Amencan Micro- 
systems S 2S6S rtvytfim generatof. 

Dirck Spacer 

Wlldv^ood Uive 

Durham CT 06422 

I am disabled with a stroke, and in the 
past two years t have had cancer surgery 
three times. Reading would hoip me re- 
gain my tieallh, and it anyone could sefid 
me some magazines, old or new, I sure 
coutd use ihem. 

Bobby Welch N4GWQ 
2d03 Aulea Dr. 

RatwDOdsKY 41139 




4^4 ♦♦^•♦♦♦^♦♦♦>' 4- 



4- 
4 

4- 



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IsAot^ HF6V— CcirnpAetafv AiticvrsSpc b^didswittidha^g 

*n uso woridwidD innce D©ci»fnt»r B1' 160 meter 
cjplion avat\Bb^ now. retrotiT kJt« for rgmaJT>»ng WARC 
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73 Magazine • July. 1983 123 



W2NSD/1 

KEVER SAY DIE 

ecZ/tona/ hy Wayne Green 



from page $ 

After all, what's the real dif- 
ference? Radio waves go every- 
where, so from a radio point of 
view, it is of little consequence 
whether the operator is in Bur- 
ma, Thailand, or Sri Lanka. For 
that matter^ one of the best 
DXpeditrons of all time, Heard 
island, was done from up near 
Vancouver, Canada, Just think 
of the trouble everyone was 
saved on that! 

When you move the DXpedl- 
tion nearer the US like that, you 
don't let propagation or dis- 
tance screw up the contacts. 
You save a fortune on boat 
charges and have a much tower 
chance of getting killed. Yoy 
save weeks of sailing, a bunch 
of gas. and in every way cut 
costs enormously. And your 
OSL cards are as valuable as if 
you'd gone to all that siily trou- 
ble and expense. 

No, today 5 DXpeditioners 
seem to have lost their spark of 
originality and imagination. 
Poor Lloyd and Iris Colvin had to 
go through all sorts of trouble to 
get Into the Persian gulf coun- 
tries and get on the air. It cost 
'em a bundle, too. And for what? 
Just to give a few thousand of 
us a card from a new coun- 
try. . .one which would have 
been infinitely easier to gel if 
they'd operated from some 
place nearer home. All you need 
Is to make the contacts, provide 
some good-looking documenta* 
tion to the ARRL, and thousands 
of hams are happy as ctams^ 

The first truly Imaginative OX* 
peditjoner Is still with us. I see 
him almost every year at 
Dayton, He set up and gave us 
contacts from a bunch of 
African countries while happily 
sittmg in Casablanca. Once he 
broke the Ice, we saw many of 
the previous DXpeditioning 
problems solved. That did away 
with quite a few arduous boat 
trips, eased country restric- 
tions, eliminated customs prob- 
lems for equipment, and so on. 

Why take a chance on braving 
the wild South Atlantic storms 
when you can save tremendous 

124 73 Magazine • July, 1983 



time and keep out of danger by 
operating from near Venezuela? 
That's where a pair of well^ 
known DXers did it. And, you 
know; it isn't much easier to 
blast through pileups to Peter 
and Paul Rocks If they have 
been moved, for convenience, to 
Venezuela instead of the Atlan- 
tic. Those same Texas and Mis- 
souri DXers are still in there 
tail-ending for twenty minutes, 
alternating calls so no one can 
tell if the DX station is transmit- 
ling or not. 

I say let's get more fun into 
DXing by going back to the old 
system. Let's get a nice little 
DXpedilion for Spratly go- 
ing. . .with the spoilsport ARRL 
chaps wtio are making people 
get killed on the boat out of 
Singapore and the rest of us out 
on Catalina Island running two 
Watts to a wet string. 

DIGITAL PERSPECTIVE 

Having gotten bitten by the 
digital bug some 35 years ago 
when I got involved with ama- 
teur radio teletype, I haven't had 
as much trouble getting into the 
digital revolution as many of the 
more conservative (lube-ori- 
ented) old^imers. And now 
we're reading about the marvels 
of digital audio, the coming rev* 
olutlon incompact laser-playing 
disks. ., maybe even digital 
television. 

As much of a fan of new ideas 
and pioneering as I am, I'm not 
yet totally convinced atjout the 
laser disk idea. The basic idea of 
digital audio is great With this 
technology it's possible to make 
recordings where you have zero 
noise from the recording medi- 
um. Yep, no tape hiss,,. zero. 
No record groove hiss, snap, 
crackle, and pop. The idea is just 
fine. And the technology makes 
it possible to extend the dynam- 
ic range of recordings from 60 
dB out to 90 dB. Remember, If 
you will, that every three 
d6 means a doubling of power, 
so t hat extra 30 dB will buy you a 
thousandfold increase in power 
capability. Whooefy, thousand- 
Watt audio amplifiers? 

Digital audio has some bene- 



fits and some drawbacks. For 
the audiophile, the results of DA 
are so spectacular that he has 
no choice but to go digital. But 
this means a lot of expense, be- 
cause while digital disk players 
will work with analog preamplifi^ 
ers and amplifiers^ a purist 
would blanch at anything less 
than digital right on through to 
the speaker. Digital speakers? 
No, little of this technology 
has even been Invented yet, but 
it will be along. This will be a 
wonderful area for small entre- 
preneurs tp get going, working 
toward starting megabuck cor- 
porations on the coattaiEs of yet 
another budding high-tech in- 
dustry. 

The messy part of this whole 
scam lies in that vaunted laser 
disk. The problem is that we're 
way behind on inventing storage 
media for data. We're still horsing 
around with round, flat records 
which have to be spun ... a hang- 
over from the early recordings of 
Edison, You'd think we would get 
the message on this when we see 
S3.Q00 record players. And even 
those aren*t as good as the early 
model laser digital players. Look 
at all the agonies we are going 
through with Winchester disks 
tor data storage in computers! 
It*s almost time to start seriously 
working on a mass memory sys- 
tem which is not mechanical 

They're talking about being 
able to put laser disk players in- 
to cars. It's laughable. Do you 
know that the silly record player 
they've invented to play those 
fournnch laser disks has to 
change speed as you go from 
the inside grooves to the outside 
from WO rpm down to 200 rpm? 
And once you know that, you re- 
alize that the speed of the rec- 
ord player has to be different for 
every single groove it plays. Talk 
about a mechanical monsterl 

We may have to use some me- 
chanics to retrieve data from a 
transportation medium, but 
spinning a record at an infinite 
number of speeds doesn't seem 
optimum. Perhaps we can come 
up with a card which can be read 
as it moves by a reader, using a 
memory cache to smooth out 
the flow of data. Or we might 
want to go to some sort of opti* 
cal/film data storage system 
which might give us higher den- 
sity of storage than micro holes 
blasted in thin films of metaL 

On the bright side, there's no 
way that cassettes wilf be able 
to handie the data storage re- 
quirements, so we may see a 
drop in the copying of records. 



These are wonderful days for 
amateurs. . .and wa should re- 
member that most of the really 
important breakthroughs in 
technology have historically 
been made by amateurs. If 
you've worked in any R&D firms, 
you know why this is as well as 
L . , and Tve done my homework 
on this one, too. I worked for an 
R&D lab at one time and saw 
with my own eyes why virtually 
no significant developments In 
technology can emerge. 

The key lies in the funding 
process, R&D labs do not hire 
people to do what is called basic 
research. . ,at least few of them 
do. Basic research Is experi- 
menting for the hell of experi- 
menting, with no commercial 
product in mind. We used to 
spend a lot of money this way 
before WWII, but when the war 
came we stopped this *'waste* 
ful" spending and only worked 
on projects where there was a 
good potential for results. 

It's still this way. If the lab 
manager is able to convince 
management that there Is an 
almost certain chance for a prof* 
stable product to emerge, the re- 
search funds can be found. Iffy 
projects are tabled. The ama- 
teur, of course, with no one to 
stop him, can work on anything 
his heart desires. And if he 
comes up wrth something farv 
tastic, he's got it made. If not, 
well, at feast he's had the fun of 
trying. This is why hams in the 
past have come up with most of 
the real breakthroughs in radio 
technology. 

ft's getting time to experiment 
over the air with some digital 
audio. We might even want to try 
some digital stereo and see 
what we can do with it. A sam- 
pling rate of 10 kHz might work 
out fine for our f ype of communi- 
cations rather than the 44 kHz 
they use for high-fidelity music. 
That's a little broad, but. after 
all, we're just experimenting. We 
might be able to get that down 
to 6 kHz and still have better 
voice communications than we 
have now. 

The objective is to get a maxF 
mum of information through for 
a given band of frequencies and 
a given time, so whether we find 
it better to do with a 50-kHz-wide 
band or a ^-kHz band isn't as rel- 
evant as the throughput. If we 
can digitize voice and then senc 
it in short blasts at high speec 
with error-correcting, we coulc 
end up with a very efficienl 
communication medium. 

The world of digital audio is 



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73 Magazine * July, 1983 125 



just getting going. It is going to 
turn into an enormous business. 
Are you going to be one of the 
winners in this? 

DENTRON 

A ptece in Newsweek a few 
weeks ago about a suit by Ron 
Hubbard's son to take over the 
Hubbard Scientoiogy empire, 
claiming that no one has seen 
Hubbard for over two years and 
that he is presumed dead, 
brought to mind a recent rumor 
that DenTron had been bought 
by Scientology, 

Having more than a casual in- 
terest in Hubbard and Scien- 
tology, I called DenTron to see 
what was up. Scientology has 
been getting a lot of flak of late, 
with exposes on television, 
books exposing it, and so on. 
Well, having b&eo around when 
It began and having personally 
known Hubbard, I like to Keep up 
with what's going on. 

Scientology got started back 
in 1950 with the publication of 
an articte in Analog magazine 
(science fiction). I'd been read- 
ing the magazine for many years 
and was particularly interested 
In an article on a new book being 
published by Hubbard on Dla- 
netlcs, a new science of the 
mind. I got the book, started 
right In experimenting with 
some of the techniques de- 
scribed therein, and had some 
truly amazing experiences. 

Hubbard's book was flamboy* 
ant and his claims extravagant, 
but since the fundamentals of it 
made more sense than any 
other approaches to the mind, I 
decided to look into it further. I 
took a six-week course at the 



Hubbard Dianetic Research 
Foundation in Elizabeth, New 
Jersey, and became an ac- 
credited Dianetic Auditor, 

The school was fascinating. 
There was the element of balo- 
ney with the Hubbard claims of 
producing ^'clears" who had 
eldetic recall and were in most 
respects perfect people. We 
never saw anyone like that. But 
the concept was a good one and 
the techniques did produce the 
most incredible results in a 
hurry. 

The story going around the 
school was that the whole idea 
for Dianetics was developed by 
someone else and that Hubbard 
had come across the manu- 
script for the work when the real 
author was ir\ a hospital and 
died. So the claim went that 
Hubbard look the extensive 
research as his own, adding 
what he thought might result 
from the therapy— clears— as 
an accomplished fact. 

Now Hubbard is, or was. a 
very magnetic person. He was a 
good writer and a persuasive BS 
artist. But the quick success of 
Dianetics seemed to distress 
him. It didnl take long before 
there were many people using 
the techniques from his book 
with more success than he en- 
joyed. Keeping in mind his enor- 
mous ego and the weight on him 
of the success of the therapy 
which he claimed to have dis- 
covered, I was not at all sur- 
prised when he came up wfth a 
new approach which was mostly 
his own. - .and which he called 
Scientology, 

irs emotionally difficult to be a 
guru pretending something is 




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I would like to use my Afari 000 comput- 
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hardwa/e? 

Ron Grtasback W[>9HD0 

1712 N. Harrlman 

A|9ipl»ton Wl S491t 

126 73 Magazine * July, 1983 



1 am looking tor schomatics and 
operating in^nuals for tli« lollov^mg 
equipmeni a US H&^y 4.Q-27.Q-MHz 
RBC-T receiver; a Laicestiore Industrie^ 
Band Hopper" SSB vfo; and a C^ntraf 
ElGc Ironies mode! 20 A mulll-phase ex- 
cii^f. I wilfi pay for manuals or copying 
costs, 

Peter Dohefty WtVOl? 

PO Boit 291 

Pod TownsemiS WA 9d36A 

My flea-market EJdica transmitter, model 
SSB lOOMi^ manufactured by Eldlce Elac- 
tronics of Mlnoo^a NY, did not come with a 
manual or circuit diagrams- I would ftke to 
t>tjy a manual ftjjm someor>e wT>0 lias a 
spaie set or borrow some Itiat I could copy, 

Richard E. DownlrFg W1TXS 
16 Woodslde Teiraca 
Sphngfie^dMAOIlOB 



your own when it isn't, so he 

came up with his own. This was 
cloaked as a religion, tx^th aa a 
way to get around laws against 
medical treatment by non^loc- 
tors and as a way of l>rain- 
washing the impressionable. 

Having been at the HDRF^ I re- 
mained on the Scientotogy mail- 
ing Itsts for years, getting their 
literature and receiving hundreds 
of letters suggesting I come in 
for updating. I kept answering all 
letters with the question: If you 
are able to really do such 
marvelous things, please show 
rT>e one single example of a per- 
son who has been so improved 
by Scientology that he or she 
now stands out in some way over 
the rest of us. I never saw any In- 
dication that Scientotogy could 
even come close to Oianetics in 
effectiveness. , ,and so no one 
seemed to emerge as outstand- 
ing in talents from the process. 

Large numbers of Scientolo- 
gists were used to write personal 
letters to prospective recruits. 
They had to write by hand, , . 
sincere, . .and encourage the 
correspondent to come in for a 
'*tes1 run." 

One of the results of just 
about sny type of mental 
therapy ts the feeling that one 
has improved. Just as the sugar 
pill placebo given by doctors is 
capable of remarkabie cures of 
some illnesses, the application 
of almost any psychotherapy 
seems to make some people 
feel better. Trading on this 
response, the Scientologists 
quickly get newcomers involved 
With their strange perception of 
reality, and they find it difficult 

to get loose. 

Hubbard was able to build up 

his Church of Scientology Into a 
multinational organization, with 
the headquarters at St. Hill, a 
huge estate in England. When 
governmental pressures from 
some countries grew too great, 
he moved his personal HQ to a 
converted cargo ship served by 
the etite of his group. I remem- 
ber the glowing brochures asking 
for volunteers for this. Golly, the 
enthusiasm and excitement of 
those brochures was Inn and 
almost too much to resist. 

The church is now a large, rich 
organization with branches all 
over the world. And, I suspect, 
judging from the DenTron ex- 
ample, they are investing in 
businesses Ihese days, not Just 
in their own growth. I was as- 
sured by the president of Den- 
Tron that the Scientologist who 
had worked with them had 



recently left and that there was 
no more connection. 

Getting back to Dianetics. . ♦ 
i've kept i n touch with most of the 
better known psychotherapies 
over the iast thirty years and I 
know of none which works with 
the ease, speed, and thorough- 
ness of Dianetics, I got to be 
quite good with the techniques 
Involved artd found that I was 
able to discover the roots of most 
problems people were having 
and could help them substantial- 
ly In a matter of hours. But I also 
found that very few people realiy 
want to be helped. They've ad- 
justed lo some degree to their 
mental problems and are defen- 
sive about them. 

Many of the basics of Dianet- 
ics were pooh-poohed by the 
establishment back in 1950, soil 
has been interesting for me to 
keep abreast of the develop- 
ment of these other schools of 
therapy and see them gradually 
accepting the very concepts 
which they found so totally 

ridiculous in 1950. 
One of the basic concepts 

had to do with the way the brain 
lies up part of its ability to think 
when faced with a painful situa- 
tion, either physical or mentaL 
The most fundamental ruie for 
any organism is to survive and 
thus pain signals are interpreted 
as a threat to survival By decon* 
dilioning these painful mo- 
ments in the past we found that 
IQs increased and the ability to 
think zoomed upward. 

Fortunately for our peace of 
mind, all of these pain memories 
and the subconscious responses 
they force upon us are carefully 
hidden from our conscious 
mind, with behavior, no matter 
how weird, rationalized. 

Well, sorry for the usual 
digression, but I don't think I've 
ever written about Scientology 
or Dianetics before, and I sus- 
pect that very few people alive 
know about the possibly true 
roots of this amazing psycho- 
therapy. And, yes, I'm familiar 
with Freudian analysis, the 
Karen Homey school, Gestait 
psychology, Korzybsky, Ex- 
aminer Therapy, Integration 
Therapy, and so on. 

Did Hubbard come across the 
manuscript for Dianetics in a 
hospital In Burma during the 
war and pick It up from the dying 
real author? If Hubbard is dead, 
we may never know. But we do 
know that he was able to use 
that start to build a multi-billion 
dollar empire reaching around 
the globe. 



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73 Magazine • Juiy, 1983 127 



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128 73 Magazine • July, 1983 



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TavtxfOxSV^ inefi«g Weighi 
75 lbs. Us«d, good iMorking cor> 
ditlon. Includes pariiAl manual 
re product Jon- 

R392fURR 

D S to ^ MH£ m ^ mncss. AM 
«n4 €W Bcndwttftri £. 4, and i 
i«H2 B * and Fiianwnt wottOQea 
24 VDC Power i^put 2* VDC ^ 3 
Ampi. D^imensJons 14xi2x 
TiVr incnes Wfl^ghi 52 lbs, 
Uaed. gaod workifiiQ COi^dllidn. 
JncJudes pirlial minutl repro- 
ductbn, 

Pric*! F.O B. Nonh Hoiiiywocxt. 

Alkiw lt>r s^ifi^ng 

'iVritt lor irsei^^^uott cuvtog 






Davftyn Corporation 

1140e Satkny StnM 
Nwlh Hallywx»(L CA ft1«05 



RTTY 

FOR THE 

VIC 20 

SIMPLE AND INEXPENSrVE 
FULL'FEATUnED BTTY 

* &AUPQT Am A^n AU DxTiman Sfteeds 

* €W ID lAfith Vour Ctil Pm-Pf oflrainm ai 

* T<v»sini/ Receive (PTTi Co^At 

■ j^ \^t^ Any Tt^fF^wtif Ifnrt - 5<tnpi^ Hoofcuip lltttHCUon^ 

fliCV|RSiQW A\SB has TO Message BuW&t. Automatic CO Sirr 
and End Messa^^s. Sinus O^spEay. many ol^iar FeaEUits 

flTTYSK (req 3K rnflriiofy expan,'5'fin) ^\^% 



Send Cfwck or Money Omef To 
MICROFISH SOFTWARE PRODUCTS 

PO Box 920342 *^2bt 

Norcross, Georgia 30092 



CB TO TEN METER 
CONVERSION KITS 



10 METER FM— Limiter discrimi- 
nator board with specific instruc- 
tions to fit over 80 different AM & 
SSB chassis 

SSB'AM KITS— Now m stock 
Kits for most CB models— 23 or 40 
Channels 

NEW & USED— FMSSB^AhA 
converted C.B.'s in stock 

ANEXTER MARK ANTENNAS 

—You saw them at Dayton. Now in 
stock the HW-3 three band hetewhip 
that covers 10—15—20 meters with 
no traps 
FREE CATALOG— v^rixe of call 

today INOEPENDENT 

CRYSTAL SUPPLY COMPANY 



141 Rt.SA. Box 183 

Sandwich. Ma 02563^0183 

(617)88&4302 



i^78 



-"U>4 



IVi/C 
Visa 

95 



$129 

NEW! HF WATTMETER 

• Digltat Resolution (0 1 or 1 Wall] 

• Wideband f 1 60 tfirougti 1 meters) 

• Wtde range ^QRP lo 1999 Walls ^ 

• Detachable |RF Sainplef un-plLigs? 

• Battery Saver turns off mtnuies affer 
RF disappears 

■ Price includes— Readout, MF Sampler, 
battery. VSWR 
nomogfam 
and complete 
sGhennstJcs. 

• 90 day 
warranty |^ 

write Of call: 
c-tek P.O. Bo* 62S. Marietta, OH 45750 

1-{6l4j-374-2280 



FIELD DAY 
TRANSCEIVERS 

RT'77/GflC-9, portable 2- 
12 Mhi unil; 7 watts (AM), 
15 W (CW) outpul. 2E22 bibe 
In PA; TO trthertutjes RequJfiS 
580 V too ma. 5,6 V 2 amp, 
120 V 45 ma, 1.5 V 500 ma, 
& 6.9 V 575 ma. 16x13x8", 

35 lbs. sh Used. $39,95 

MAJ^UAL $8.50; CONNEC- 
TORS. $4 ea w/set purchase, 

GN^58 HANDCRAHK 
GENERATOR w/iegs* seat 

powers RT-77 al reduced oulputs 3,6 W (A ML 
10 W (CWl 40 lbs, Used ............ $35. 

RT'67t/PRC-47, 2-t2 Mtii USB. CW: 100 wtm 

max Solia-state; CoHins mfg. Reqyires 2B VDC In- 
clydes ftandsei, antenna, ott>er accessorifs; 180 lbs 
sh. in iran&il case. Useb-daan : $395.00 

R-3S9/IJRR VLF RECEIVER, ^b-^m mi in two 

ranges, 7 b^nds; 455 KhJ! IF 3£ tubes; requires 11 5/230 VAC. 
UoitB iW sold Jesi Hue and cafrser Ltv^ meters. UsetJ- 
roparaCiit $250. manual, {saitial repro $17. 

Prices F.O.S. Ufni. 0. * VISA, MAST^CAHO Accspted. 
AHowf Of Shipping • Send ^Ntir FREE CATALOG 33 
Irtss Dt^ 73 • PtieiW: 413/227-6573 




I 



*^22 

1016 £. euBIKA - eo« M05 - LtMA. ONiO ■ 45101 



^Sdfr List of Advertisers on pugs 1 14 



73 Magazine • July, 1983 129 






AC5D 

COMPUTER PROGRAllS 
FOR TEX.INST.99/4-4A 

TAPE OR DISK 
CW RECEIVE /TRANSMIT 
CV; PRACTICE (SENDING) 
CW PRACTICE (RECEIVING) 

CW FOR YOUNGSTERS 
U,A.S. & 6 BAND W.A.S. 
DXCC & 6 BAND DXCC 
1010 NUMBER SEARCH 
AMATEUR CALL LOCATOR 
SSTV KEYBOARD DISPLAY 
BARNYARD MATH FOR KIDS 

WRITE 

SAM H. MOORE, SR. 

P. 0. BOX 368 
STIGLER, OKLA. 74462 



^6 



^P^D! 



T 



DDRR Space Beatersl 

The Repeater Beaters 

I * SASE STATIOM OUALmf. tnm m moUlf 
• Say ^ood-bf io iiKKbll* fiylter {pleli«1 




• Sqr flMd-bf |» WwMa J 

ALL THIS m.U9 

• OPEN THE TOUOH ONESI tiy «dcino i« 
optt«n«l CR2X or CR3X R«ii9« Exiandar. 



Cfl2A* (1M MHQ $39 phH 

CR3A taSi» ItHD $2 




$12(»iui 

am $2iii4)f*ia 

{t»>ntin«ntJil USA) 

' AE M VIEWED NX 71 WMUJJKNP fJCirUBBI If* 



COM-RAO, tNO< 
1ft3S WEST nrVER PAflKWAY 
GRAHO i&JMD, NEW TOflK 14073 
^1B3 (n€) 77^1441 



YOU EARNED YOUR CALL! 

NOW DISPLAY IT PROUDLY 
IN A TOP QUAUTY 

LACOSTE-TYPE KNIT SHIRT. 
ONLY SI 4.00 With your cair in rich em- 
broicJery. 

$1.50 extra for frrst 
name. Choose 
from 10 great 
colors: rust 
cream, brown, 
green, yellow^ 
navy, it blue, 
aqua, white, and 
black. 

Adult sizes only S-M-L-XL Club and dealer 
Inquiries invited. Please add $2.00 for P/H. 
Make check or money order payable lo: 

Coin Ini1 Inc, 

2305 N.W, 107 Ave. 
Miamit FL 33172 ^13 

Ajlow 4 we^ks fof deHvery Fl residents add sales tax 





••-A-********************** 

% QUALITY MICROWAVE TV SYSTEMS J 

J Complete Systems From ^69^^ J 

^ 1 .9 to 2.5 

t GHz 

^ Antennas 

t Galaxy 
If Electronics 

I G(K)7H.eistAve, 
3f Glenitalep Az. 

t 85301 

^ 1-602-247-1151 

I 1-800*247-1151 

^ C€0*t / Dialn Wanted 




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STAH 



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if 




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PWETUMCD - COMPLET* 
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rOR ALL MAKES 4 
MODELS or AMATEUR 
TftANSCEIVEftS r GUAR- 
ANTEED FOR £0OO 
WATTS SSe INPUT FOR 
NOVICE AND ALL CLASS 
AMATEURS1 IMPROVED 
DESJGNI 



COMPLETE whli OO ft. RGSeU-Sa ohm r**Mn«, «nd 
PL259 t9ttn«ctor, JntuLitoMrs^ 30 fl 3D0 Ml. tm Mefbn and 
tLVfi^nii, i: rntvf conntctor WRh bvA hn IgUu^hng ■TVStv and 
stxtik dtic^urge • maW*d, vaalaeL WKSttMfWVOT. rttafWlH tt^A 
y*-XS" - r^u just »«Fitc4k t« bind dstift«^ tv eEc«Aani mund<^-a^t 
opsfttiUitt - tt mnAma.tk*a ■'lit t*c*ivliL^ LdwSWR «w «■ bi-niL 
-TiAHn imitmi NOT NCEPEOf Can bm trnvd u tawcpt«d V i 
9iop9K% - Mi mtOLA. on mimaioQ uipm v aahvw lotx. . Thw CTfLT AN- 
T^NftA YOU WILL CVEft NEEO FOR ALL BANDS - WITH 
ANY TRANSCOVER * NEW - NO SALENS NEEDEDI 

eD-40-204S-tO-'2 trip* I04ft ^Madoi 95BBUC Se^9,96 
40-20-15-10 »2 iTBft ^*&4 tt. ' Madei I001BUC , . $sa,95 
ZO-^16-10 in*tftf - 3 trip. 26n,- Motfai lOOTBUC^ > SeT,9S 

SENP FULL PRICE FOR POSTPAID INSURED CCL IN USA. 
(CAiuda h* SJ5-00 exir* tor fHJSlage - tJ^^ical- tuit&ma s-lc^ or 
OP0e# iM*%B VISA - MA&TUR CARD - AMER EKPFlESSh 
Gif* numtar and •& aai« P*, i-30e-23&-S333 9AM ^ &PM 
w^eeL dar*^ We *NEi In 2*3 days. ALL PRICES MAY INCREASE 
OROCR NOWl Al Mlaimac wiMmntmrn* far 1 ¥*v. lO «aT mofiey 
&»Gl trtot It retiMttad ^ haw [:«iiaj«# Mm* k^ USA- FTtCE ?NFO. 
A V Alt ABLE OHVt FROM 

WESTERN ELECTRONICS *^S0 



RELIABLE MICROWAVE TV ANTENNAS 



Z1 to ZB GHz Frequency Range 

34flb System Gaifi (or Greater) 



Complete System (as pictured) 
Down Converter Probe Style 

(AssemWed and Tested) 
Power Supply (12V to 16V DC*) 

(Assembled and Tested) 



$1 19.95 
S 49.95 
$ 39.95 




PETERSON 

ELECTRONICS 

4558 Auburn Btvd. 
Sacramento. C A 95841 
(916) 486-9071 

COD s 

SPECIAL QUANTITY 
PRICING 
Dealers Wanted 



t YEAR WARRANTV 
PARTS C LABOR 










SALE! SALE! SALEt SALE! 

V^^ USED EQUIPMENT ^^ 
TESTED BY 73 STAFF 
OTHERWISE LUCE NEW 



> ^ ^ '^ ^ ^ % 



Icom 45 1 A Transctiver 
Icom PS IS Power Supply, 
Icom 560 Traiuceiver . . , 
kom Z90H Transceiver, 
icom 490A Transeciver . 
lcofii4ATHT. .. 

Icom 3 AT HT 

Ya«u FT408R 2fn Ttansc^ver 

Vacsy FF20eR HT 

Robot Research Mod«l 400 . 



^ ^ ^^ 




—1 j^-^ 



Checif QT Money Order 

Contact: (603) 924-9471 
MATT SMITH 
73 MAGAZINE 
PINE STREET 

PEIERBOROUGH NH 
0345S 







Have an Apple? 

Want to work RTTY? 

Know about Super^Ratt? 

You should. 



Call or wrfte 
for details. 



UNIVERSAL SOFTWARE SYSTEMS INC 
9 SHIELDS LAN£ - RiDGEFtELO, CT 06677 
{2031438-311? ^iQQ 




130 73 Magazine • July, 1983 



RAMSEY 
ELECTRONICS 

•^ 62 Inc. 



PARTS WAREHOUSE 



We now have available a bunch of goodjes too 
good to bypass Items are limited so order today 



2575 Baird Rd. 
Penfield, NY 14526 

718 586 3950 / 



MINI KITS - YOU HAVE SEEN THESE BEFORE NOW 

HERE ARE OLD FAVORITE AND NEW ONES TOO. 

GREAT FOR THAT AFTERNOON HOBBY. 



FM 

MINI 

MIKE 




A Super riigh pertorrriance FM wire- 
less frtikfi kill! Transmils a s-lafciffl 
Signal up to 300 yartJs wifh excep- 
lional audio qualiTy hy mear>s of W^ 
built \T\ electrei mil*;e Kit lnc^udes 
ca$e mike on-off switch antenna 
battery and super inslruClnons This 
IS the finest unit ava<labl:e 

FM-3 Kil *14,9S 

FMi-3 Wnred and Tf?!i,(FTr 19.95 



FU Wireless Mike Kh 

T^ansmpls up ^o 300' 10 

any FM t>r03dcast rg- 

dJO uses any lype o! 

mike Runs on 3 to 9V Type FM-2 

nas added sensiEwe mil^e preamp 




FM-T kir 13.95 



FM-2 kit S4.95 



Univeraal Timer Kil 

Provides t*ie hasic parts and PC 
board requjred id provide a source 
^\ precision hming and pulse 
geneiation Uses 555 iimer IC and 
<nciijde& a raritje of parts for most 
l^mmg needs 

UT-fi Kit is. 95 



Color Organ 

See music conne 
alivei 3 differeni 
lights flicker wiih 
musiC One light 
each tor. high 
midl-rarige and 
Jows Each mdi- 
vjduaHy adiusl- 
abie and drrves up 
to 300 W runs on 
110 VAC 

Cortipilete k'lt, 
ML-T 
$8.95 



Vidf4 Mp^^uEBtDr Kit 

Con-verts any TV \t^ uidcO mafiitflif Supi^T 
Stable. cgoflbJe over ch J-6 Runs &n S 
15V. actepT5 s.!d video Signal Best un it on 
I hfi market' CompJ^re kil VO-T i7,95 



L«d Blink y KM 

A great attention get- 
ter which alteiTiately 
ffasttes 2 jumbo LEDs 
Use for name badges, 
buttons warning 
panei ilights. an.y|hing' 
Runs on 3 to 15 volls 
Completf^ k<t BL-1 
£2.95 




Super Steulh 

A super sens^■^lve ampli- 
fier whtch will pick up a 
pin drop at 15 feet I Great 
for nnion (taring babys 
room or as general pur- 
pose amplifier Full 2 W 
nn& output runs on 6 to 
15 \^olts. uses 8-45 Ohm 
speaker 
Compleie kit BN-9 

$5 95 



CPO 1 

Runs on 3-i2 Vdc I wall 
Alarm Auctio ■Oscillssor 



oul 1 KHZ Qood tor CPO. 
Complete kit S3;.95 




Whisper Light Kit 

An interestrng krl. smaH mfke 
pic^<s up sounds and converts 
tt^em to ipghi The louder the 
sound, the bricihter the ligh! 
Includes miKe. controls up lo 
300 W. runs on 110 VAC 
ComplBte kit. WL-1 
S6.95 



Mad Blaster Kit 

Produces LOUDflar shattering and 
anention getting siren like sound 
Gan supply up to 15 waits of 

obnoNiou$ audio Run^ on 6-1 5 VDC 



MB-1 K4 



S4 9& 




TQn« Decoder 

A complete lor^e deco- 
der on a Single PC 
board Features 400- ^^—^ 
5000 Hz adjustable ~^—-J 
r^nge via20lufnpot voMageregu- 
lalion 567 IC Useful for touch- 
lone burst detection. FSK etc 
Can also be used as a staple to^e 
encoder Runs on 5 to 12 voJts 
Complete kil. TD-1 $5.95 



Siren Kil 

Produces upward an^d do*ni\Afard 

wa^J charactf?ristfc of a police 

Srren 5 W peak audio Output runs 

on 3-15 volts uses 3-45 ohm 

speaker 

Complele (<^t SM 3 S2,9S 



6^ Hj Ttme Bast 



Calt your Phone Order in Today. TERMS: 
Satisfaction guaranteed or money refunded. 
C-O-D. add $2.50. Minimum order S6.00. 
Orders under $10.00 add $1.50. Add 6% for 

postage ^ insurance, handfing. Overseas add 
1&%. N.Y. residents add 7% tax. 



CLOCK KITS 

Your old favorllfi» ^r« htire agairi. Over 7,000 Sold lo Date. 
Be on« of the gdng and order youri lodAy! 

Try your hand at building the fmest looking clock on the 
market Its satin finish anodized aluminum case fooks great 
anywhere, vvtiile six ,4" LED digits provide a highly readabJe 
display Thts is a complete kit no extras needed, and Ft oniy 
takes 1-2 houj's to assemble Your choice of case co^ors- 
siJver. gold, biack (specify). 

Clock kit 12/24 hour, DC-5 $24,95 

Ctock wHtl 10 mm ID timer, 12/24 hour. DC-lO $29.95 

Alarm cfock. 12 hour only. DC-S 129,95 

12V DC car clock. DC-7 $29.95 

For wired and tested clocks add Si 0.00 to kit price 
SPECIFY 12 OR 24 HOUR FORMAT 



SATELLITE TV KIT 




THE POf^U^LAR SAT TEC nECEJVEfi Ih KlTI^OftMt 



rnag« rejection, fully 1unat^le «ydfe In recover 
t«dden' aubcarTfers, cfivide try two PLL aerr^odu- 
Isi^jr faj EKCelleql thr&shoJd perior^Tfiance. tight 
irac**ing AFC 10 ^^sure cfriF" tree rBt^pliiirj. arid 
of C-OUrs-e. tu'l ?■* chson^l Ign.^tJle cgverailB. 

&ulld ydur jitBllilfl TV ayalsm araund iri4 A2&, 
dost \<i-\%f\ iriOu:&andDlf>Gr& a|rsQdyhav6 an^jno^ 
It's tvSJIflble Jft kil 10 rm a[ a new low price. Order 
yflurg loofay. 



PARTS PARADE 



Fealu^rfld m A fladio Efeclronics magazine cover 
ssory rWay S?1-. Ih-e reli&ble B2B &at-l*c TV 
receiver a^ now aperpsing m [tiOu^a.r^d& of loca< 
^icns. The Ft^B is MSy to tJulld. pfc-etctied, 
pSal&d: troards with screenerj cidrrtponflrit layout 
assures accurate compo'nent d lacemenl and tihe 
critical IF section and local oscillatoi are p^f^ 
assembled anfi aliened! All parts art ir^cluded 
lor tfie n?B. aitraciiv'e ca$e'. power supply, 
d&scnpiive operatrng ruafiuBl as well a? com- 
pl^l? asgjjmbly inEfruHjti-Dnt. FfiaUiriiS 0l ff^e r#- 
ioiver mcjude: dual conversJor desi^gn lor tsest 



A compiBie Satei 1 1 te TV Sygterp raaiirr E a 
a dish antsr^na. LNA. (low noise- amah 
tief), Receiver arid t^odu^lator 
FI2fi FtQCSiyer Kit S359.m 

FI2B Fi^cHi v&r. Wired a.fi<] Tssrwi S595 m 
1 50 ■ K Ayantek LNA 5395.00 

Fl M 3 RF Mo^Jufator &*9-^Si 

Prices mcJdde domesiic UPS snippmg 
ar^d jfisufance. 



IC SPECIALS 



3&1 
3?J 

56.^ 
'H\ 

3311 



LINEAR 



^ 



% 35 


$1 £0 


11 50 


S 45 


»1 00 


11 00 


ti.oo 


$1 Ih 


1O.'J2.0O 


% 50 


f ^0 


t295 


tZ95 



TTL 



7447 
7^75 
7490 
74 196 



$ 40 
% 65 
$ .50 
S SO 

S1 35 



SPECIAL 



CMOS 



ton 
ty4e 

tD59 
iSn 

i5ie 




READOUTS 

^NP 359 ^ [t C *1 00 

■MI] 50,' -5 10 S CA 14» 

irtAti 73- HPi'730 3j!."C A 1.00 



TRANSISTORS 

'NS-we pr+p c*F i5/ti.» 

■Ni403 PNf^ C' F layii <h 

■NilH 1 NPti C ■ F 1*^*1 .00 

■N49i&feic*P */ti.oo 

'*j&4di PhfP C-F Vti oq 

'N6o?ec-f= 4rsi w 

'N3?Ti NPtJ Sil.CCir^ ll-S* 

■NS179UHFNPN 3..'UO0 

>^jw*r tab PNP 40i^ 3/1 « 

^Pf 1CIZ''?N54M t.» 

iPM 3«H r^p* T-R »m » 

»NP rjSKW ry-iM r-'F^ Mj'lJ.H 

'M3Clfi6 t.H 

-N294fl L^JT 3/t:} » 



1 1 C90 

10116 
720e 
7^07 A 

72ieo 

7ta7C 
53 14 

5375AB/&: 
7001 



$15.00 
$ 1.25 
$1 7.50 
$ 5.50 
$21.00 
$12.50 
$ 2.95 
$ 2.95 
S e.50 



FERRITE BEADS 

Wiiri ifiVi and specs IS-tl.OO 
6 -Koie Sfllun Bead^ %>%%fA 



Sockets 

6 Pm 10;S2.0{) 

14 Pm 10/S2.00 

16 Pfn 10/12.00 

?4 Pm 4/i2 00 

?8 Pin 4/12 00 

40 Pin 3/$2.00 



D)od«» 

5 1 V Zener 2O/$1.0O 

tN9l4 Type M/Sl.OO 

tKV 2Annp «/$1.00 

lOOV lAmp 15/*1.0O 



25 AMP 

100V Brrdge 

$1.50 each 

Mini-Bridge 50V 

1 AMP 

2 for $1.00 



Resistor Ass'l 

Af3s.orTm?*nl pf Poputar yaj^ijea 
wall Cut lead for PC noounting 
canter '.•■' leads bag of 300 or 
more 

St.50 



Switches 

Mini toggle SPOT 11.00 

R&CJ Pushbirrtons M n 3/S1,00 



Earphones 
Iliads B cituri qcX3<l lor small. tone' 
sp^al(er5 alarm C^OClts elC 
^fOrSl.OO 



Mini a ohm Speph«r 

Apprijx ?'* ' diam Roun/^ 
fype tor radios mike ■&!<!: 
^ lor S2.0d 



Crv&tals 

3 579545 MHZ SI. 50 

m 00000 MHZ tS.flfl 

5 ?4ea00 MHZ $5.00 



AC Aitaiplefi 

Goocr for clocks nicad 
tf-aitjtirs,al» 110 VAC piu^ 
onf> c-nd 

6 5 vdc^ 30 FffiA $1.00 

tf? v*e (H' teOmA $2.&0 

\7 ■\sn.r rS paOrriA $3.00 



S-oMd Sliit« By^ze^s 

smB»^ tjuizer 4£0 Hf 86 dB source! 
OulpuT orf 5.^2 vdc al 10- 30 mA. TTL 
cornpatibte $1.S0 



Slijf Tuned CoHa 

Small 3.16" Hex Slugs turned cail 
^fwrns ■ 10 far $1.00 



AC Ouhel 

Panel IVpunt with Leads 
I'SLOO 



CAPACITORS 

T4NTALUH 

OiurJfO t. OI.-KV 

1.5 uF 25V 3/$ 1.00 
t.6uF25V 3/31.00 
.22 uF 25V 3/S1.00 



^iUMINUH 

£iij<::i-oiv' < 

laog '^^ \^\ ^»i.i<4i t.so 

50[} uF 20V A;>4al ».M 
150 -J F i«V ^.i^rai J.'SH» 
10 uF r^vRadiBi 10.^11.00 



DESK CCRAHtC 

Q1 i*v d'5* SCSI M 
^ >6V 15J1 CW 

001 1i6V !Q.'t1 □€ 

'danF 14'ti DO 

wr lev ao^'Si.oo 



Audio 
Prescaler 

Make high resolution audto 
measurments. great Tor musical 
instrument tuning PL fOnt^S. etc 
Multiplies a udfo UP in frequency 
seJectabfe xio or xiOO gn/es 01 
HZ resolution with i sec gate 
(ime^ High sensitivity of 25 mv. 1 
meg mpul t and built-in fiUermg 
gives greal performance Runs 
on 9V battery, ail CMOS 
PS-2 fc.it $29.95 

PS'2 wired $39.95 



600 MHz 



PRESCALER «■ 




Extend the range of your 
counter to 600 MHz Works 
with all cotjnters Less than 
150 mv sensitivity specify - 
1 or - 1 00 

Wired, lested, PS-IB S59.95 
Kit PS- IB $44.95 



DC 'DC Can verier 

■5 vdc mpuf pifod -9 vdc ^_m': 30nia 
■ft Mdc pfoduees i5 ^dc (aiSSma $1.^5 



JSK 20 Turn T"m Pot 11 00 

1K 00 Turn Tfim F^Sl $ .50 



^1 



Ceramic IF FiU*^^--^ 
Min— p,i D QU^ 'kHz 

BVV S^^Tl 41.50 ea 




Tnmm*^ Cipt 

SpraQue 3^40 pf 

Sfable Polyfjropylene 

SO •« 



30 Watt 2 mtr PWR AMP 
SimpJe Class C power amp features 8 times power gain 1 Wm 
for 8 out. 2 Win for 1 5 out. 4W in for 30 out Max output of 35 W 
increctJbie value, complete with all parts, less case and T-R relay 
PA-1 . 30 W pwr amp kit $22.95 

TR-1 RF sensed T-R relay kit 6.95 



MRF-238 irartsisTor as used m PA-1 
a-tOdbiQain 150mh^ SlL^SS 



RF actuated relay sensos RF 

(1W) and closes DPDT refay. 

For RF sensed T-R relay 
TR-1 Kit $6.95 



Power Suppty Kii 

Compt*?Te triple regufated power 
Supply provides vgf«a&l& 6 to i& volts at 
2CK)fnaand +&al 1 Amp Excelleni load 
regulation. Cfood tittermg and small 
5 ij e L. e s£ ( r a nsf or-m ers . req u i r^es 6 3 V 
,*. 1 A 3nd 24 VCT 
Gorripiete kiT PS-3LT 16,95 



Crystal Microphone 

SmaM 1" diameter i' thtck 
crystal mik.e cartridge S.7S 



CoBK Connector 

Chassis mourii 

BNC type $1.00 



Mini RG-174 CoaJi 
10 It tor $1.00 



OP'AMP 

BF-FET L F 13741 - Orrect pm for pirt 
input I. super low 50 r^f>l Ql 
SOIofonI/ S9.00 ^^*^ 



Speciil 

^JL\''i-r Cf^tibte. bu! 500 000 MEG 

oux 

12.00 



'.K power drajn 
10 for 



9 Volt Batlary Ctlpi 
Nice quaf'ty cups S lor tl.CW 

**■' RubOflT Grommets 10 fpr $1.00 



Pawtm Bag 

Assi ol cuokBE a ISC caps lani ^e-B-iBtors 

Sfansisfors cfioOta MiCA c*ps elc 

im tMQ ^100 pci Sl.M liQ bag f3CiQ pci $S.M 



ConrHtclon 

6 ptn lype gold corlacis lor 
mA-iOO^ carctack rnoouie 
price 75 •« 



Lftctt - your choice plea&e specify 

Mini Red. Jumbp Red High Intensjty Red. liluminatar Hed i/$1 

Mjni Velio* Jumbo Yellow, Jumbo Greer* 6.''f 1 



Motorola My 2209 W PF NorTs*f>3l cap SO-W Pf 

.50 w^h Of 3/i1.00 



Tunable rarvg& 



79WG 

309 K 

7805 



I1.JS 
S1.25 

11.15 
$1.00 



R«gulfttort 



7912 
7915 
7905 
791? 
7915 



$1.00 
$1.00 
$125 
$1 25 
$1.25 



Shrink Tubing Nubi 

Nice prpc>Ul pc^s Ol sMrJnfc 51 fe 1 f. ' 
shrr^^k Id n' Gr«4t lar spiiCftS SQ/IIDQ 



Mir>i TO-92 H&at Sinks 

Th^rm^lloy Brand S li>r Si, 00 

70-220 Heat Sinks 3 lor $1. EH 



Opto Isolators - 4N38 type 
Opto Reflectors - Photo diode 



LED 



H 



$.50 ea. 
$1.00 ea. 



lio4«jr Pint 

Mole a aJreadv p^^ecul m leftgin of 7 Perf^ci 
for ^-4. ppn sQcfcBfs ZO lilr^M lor H.OO 



CDS PKeioc«4li 

Resistance varies *Jth lighl ?50 ohms to 
Dver 3 meg ^ lof tl.OO 



t^See IjsI of Attveriisers on page 1 14 



73 Magazine * July, 1983 131 



FACIT 45_55 SERIAL PAGE PRINTER 

The Eaclt ^555 alphiinuinerlcai serial printer is complete. Equipped with RS23'2C Interface, 
printing mechantsm, control electronics, drive electronics* power supply and character genera- 
tor . The adaptation electronlcts can be modified in four versions iBit-parfi] lei d^ta transfer, 
CCITT {EIA. RS232C) for bit-SL»rial data transfer and the current loop (TTY) interface also for 
bit aerial data transfer. The Fiiclt 4555 prints on ordinary paper and ia adjustable for dif- 
ferent paper widths and formats, 9,5'^ paper width with 66 lines per page or DLN A4 with 70 

lines per page, 

SPECIFICATIONS 



rrint speed 

Printing modfif 

Max, # of ch/llne 

Matrix 

Char. S±z^ Height 

Char, Size Width 



up to 60oh.s. 
Incremontal, 
80 alt. 132. 

7X5 dot matrix, 
2;7ram/l/a^^ 

l,3min/0.05" l32ch/llne 
2.lTnm/0.08J^ SOch/line 



Char, spacing 

Char. Code 
Char. Set 

Feed mechanism 



2. 54mm/ 1/10" 80ch/line 
1.55iiini/0.06" n2ch/llne 
ECMA-6 7-bit coded char, set 
63 Char, various national 
versions. 
Sprocket feed. 



THESE UNITS WERE PLiLLED OUT OF SERVICE IN GOOD WORKING CONDITION* WE CHECK EACH UNIT ON A 
RADIO SHACK TRS-eO COLOR COMPUTER, 




PRINTER ONLY 



$129,99 



Printer with linecordj box of 

paper, inter-connect cable for 
TRS-80 COLOR COMPUTER. 

$149,99 



GENEVA CALCL^ATOR WATCB 



This attractive watch has the following modes: 

Normal Time Setting^ 

Calendar Setting, 

Daily Alarm Time Setting, 

Weekly Alarm Time Setting, 

Chronograph, 

Calculator. 





Featured in Black Plastic 



$24.99 



or Featured in Stainless Steel 



$29.99 



SILICON DlODEi 


> 








FEED THRU SOLDER RF CAPACTORS 


MR751 




lOOvdc 


6Ajnps 


10/55,00 


100/$3Q.OO 


470pf +-20% 


MR510 




1000vd£ 


BAmps 


10/$3.75 


100/$24.00 




HEP 1 70 




lOOOvdc 


2Ainps 


20/§2.00 


100/$15.00 


5/$l,00 or 100/$ 13. 00 or 


IN 3209 




lOOvdc 


15Amps 


$2.00 


10/ $15,00 


1000/$ 100. 00 


EYX21/200 




200vdc 


2 5 Amps 


S2.00 


10/ $15.00 




1N2138A 




600vdc 


60 Amps 


S5,00 


10/ $40-00 


lOOOpf/.OOluf +-10% 


DSa5-04C;- 




400vdc 


BOAmps 


$10.00 


10/ $80,00 




1H3269 




600vdc 


iSOAmps 


$15.00 


10/5120.00 


4/Sl.OO or 100/$20.00 or 


275241 




300vdc 


250Amps 


S20.00 


10/S175,00 


1000/$ 150. 00 


7-5754 




300vdc 
15KVDC 


400Amps 
2 Oma, 


330.00 
$3.00 


10/$250.00 
10/ $20.00 




RCD-i3 


E PROMS 


SMFR20K 




■20KVDC 


2 Oma, 


$4,00 


10/ $30.00 


lN414a 




signal 




30/$l.00 


100/ $3.00 


2708 1024x1 $2,00 each 














2716 2048x8 $4.00 each 


FAIRCHILD 


4116 16K DYNAMIC RAMS 200n3, Part tf 


16K75 




25 For $25 


.00 


or 100 For 


S90,00 or 


1000 For $750.00 


27L32/25L32 510.00 each 


HEWLETT PACKARD MICROWAVE 


DIODES 








1N5711 




(5082-2800) 




Schottky 


Barrier Diodes 


$1.00 or 10 for $ 8,50 


lt^5712 




C.5082-2810) 




M 


ir M 


$1.50 or 10 for SiO.OO 


1N6263 




(HSCH^lOOl) 




It 


11 u 


$ ,75 or 10 tot $ 5.00 


5082-2835 








it 


t» " 


SI, SO or .10 for $10,00 


5082-2805 




Quad Matched 


tT 


" '" per 


set $5,00 or 10 for $40.00 



TofI Free Numter 
800-528-0180 
(For orders only) 

PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



(^^'t^ electroi|ici 



'All parts may he new or 
surplus, and parts may be 
suhstitutecf with cornparebte parts 
if we are out of stock ol an ilem." 



132 



73 Magazine • July, 1983 



"MIXERS" 



rtATKINS JOHNSON WJ-M6 Double Balanced Mixer 

LO and RF 0.2 to 300MH2 
Conversion Loss (SSB) 



Noise Figure (SSB) 
Conversion Compression 



IF DC to 300MHz 
6.5dB Max. 1 to 50MHz 
8.5dB Max. .2 to 300MHz 
same as above 
8.5dB Max. 50 to SOONWz 
.3dB Typ. 



$21.00 



WITH DATA SHEET 



NEC (NIPPON ELECTRIC CO. LTQ. NE57835/2SC2150 Microwave Transistor 



NF Min F=2GH2 
F=3GHz 
F=4GHz 



dB 2.4 Typ. 
dB 3.4 Typ. 
dB 4.3 Typ. 



MAG F=2GH2 


dB 12 Typ. 


F=3GHz 


dB 9 Typ. 


F=4GHz 


dB 6.5 Typ 



$5.30 



Ft Gain Bandwidth Product at Vce=8v, Ic=10iiia. GHz 4 Min. 6 Typ. 
Vcbo 25v Vceo llv Vebo 3v Ic 50ma, Pt. ZSOmw 



IMIjCO RF Power ffid Linear Anplifier Capacitors 

These are the fatnous capacitors used by all the RF Power and Linear Anplifier 
manufacturers, and described in the RF Data Book. 



5pf 

5.1pf 

6.8pf 

7pf 

8.2pf 



lOpf 
12pf 

13pf 
lApf 

15pf 



IBpf 
22pf 
25p£ 
27pf 
27.5pf 



30pf 
32pf 



34pf 
AOpf 



A3pf 
51pf 
60i3f 
oOpf 
82pf 



lOOpf 
llOpf 

I20pf 
130pf 
lAOpf 



200pf I to 

22f>pf 11 to 

470i3f 51 up 
500pf 

lonopf 



lOpcs 

50pcs 

pes 



$1.00 eaj 
$ .90 ea 
$ .80 ea 



NIPPON ELECTRIC COMPANY TUNNEL DIODES 



Peak Pt. Current ma. Ip 

Valley Pt. Current ma. Iv 

Peak Pt. Voltage mv. Vp 
Projected Peak Pt. Voltage mv. Vpp 

Series Res. Ohms rS 

Terminal Cap. pf. Ct 

Valley Pt. Voltage mv. VV 



MODEL 1S2199 
9wi1n. lOTyp. Umax. 
1.2Typ. 1.5max. 
95Typ. 120max. 
Vf=Ip 480min. 550Typ. 630max 
2.5Typ. 4max. 
l.ZTyp. 2max. 
370Typ. 



1S2200 ' 

9min. lOTyp. Umax. 

1.2Typ. 1.5max. 

75Typ, 90max. 

440min. 520Typ. 600max 

2Typ. 3max. 

5Typ. 8max. 

350Typ. 



FAIRCHILD / DUMONT Oscilloscope Probes Model 4290B 

Input Impedance 10 meg., Input Capacity 6.5 to 12pf . , Division Ratio (Volts/Div Factor) 

10:1, Cable Length 4Ft. , Frequency Range Over lOOMHz. 

These Probes will work on all Tektronix, Hewlett Packard, and other Oscilloscopes. 

PRICE $45.00 



MOTOROLA RF DATA BOOK 

Listsall Motorola RF Transistors / RF Power Amplifiers, Varactor Diodes and much much 
more. 



PRICE $7.50 



Toll Free Number 
800-528-01 80 
(For orders only) 



i^^^f[x electrof|ic$ 



**M\ parts may be new or 
surplus, and parts mav ^e 
sut>siltuted with compafaWe parts 
if we are out oT stoe^t o^ »n rieni " 



PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



(I 



h 



73 Magazine • July, 1983 133 






RF TRANSISTORS, MICROWAVE DIODES 



PART 

IS2199 

1S2200 

2N 1 56 1 

2NL562 

2N2857 

2N2857JAN 

2N2876 

2N2947 

2N2948 

2N2949 

2N2950 

2N3375 

2H3553 

2N3632 

2N3818 

2N3866 

2N3924 

2N3927 

2N3950 

2N4072 

2N4127 

2N4427 

2N4428 

2K4957 

2N4958 

2N4959 

2N5090 

2N5108 

2N5109 

2N5160 

2N5177 

2N5i79 

2N5583 

2N5589 

2N5590 

2N5591 

2N5635 

2K5637 

2N5641 

2N5642 

2N5643 

2N5645 

2N5646 

2N5691 

2N5764 

2N5836 

2N5842 

2N5849 

2N5913 

2N5922 

2N5923 

2N5941 

2N5942 

2N5944 

2N5945 

2N5946 

2N60S0 

2N6081 

2N6082 



PRICE 



PART 



PRICE 



PART 



PRICE 



7-50 

7.50 

25.00 

25.00 

U55 

2.55 

U . 00 

18.35 

15-50 

3.90 

4.60 

8-00 

1.57 

13.80 

5-00 

1-30 

3.35 

17.75 

25.00 

1.80 

21.00 

1 - 30 

1.85 

3-45 

2,90 

2.30 

13,90 

4.00 

U70 

3,45 

21.62 

1.00 

4-00 

8.65 

10.35 

13.80 

10.95 

15.30 

9.20 

10.95 

15.50 

13.80 

20. 70 

18-00 

27.00 

5.45 

8*00 

20-00 

3.25 

10.00 

25.00 

23.00 

40-00 

9,20 

11.50 

19.00 

9.20 

10.35 

11-50 



2N6083 


$ 


13.25 


2N6084 




15.00 


2N6094 1 


'M9622 


1 1 . 00 


2N6095 / 


'M9623 


12,00 


2N6096 / 


'M9624 


15.50 


2N6097 




17.25 


2N6136 




21.85 


2N6166 




40,25 


2N6201 




50.00 


2N6459 




18.00 


2N6603 




12.00 


2N66S0 




80.00 


2SC756A 




7.50 


2SC781 




2.80 


2SC101S 




1.00 


2SC1042 




12.00 


2SC1070 




2.50 


2SC1239 




2,50 


2SCI251 




12.00 


2SC1306 




2.90 


2SC1307 




5.50 


2SC1760 




1.50 


2SC1970 




2.50 


2SC2166 




5.50 


SB 1087 


CM.A.) 


25.00 


A50-12 




20.00 


A283B 




5.00 


Ain/;200N (AVAN'i'EK) 


395.00 


AM123 




97.35 


AH688 




100.00 


BB103B 




.52 


BD4/4JFBDfi (G.E.) 


10.00 


BFQ85 




1.50 


BFR90 




1.30 


BFR91 




1.65 


EFW92 




1,50 


BFX89 




1,00 


&FY90 




1.00 


BGY54 




25.00 


BGY55 




25.00 


BGY74 




25.00 


BGY75 




25.00 


BLI61 




10.00 


BLX67 




11.00 


BLY 568CF 


25.00 


BLY87 




13.00 


BLY 88 




14.00 


BLY89 




15.00 


BLY 90 




20. 00 


BLY 351 




10.00 


C4003 




20.00 


CA402 


(TRW) 


25.00 


CA405 


(TRW) 


25.00 


CA612B 


(TRW) 


25.00 


CA2 100 


(TRW) 


25.00 


CA2113 


(TRW) 


25.00 


CA2200 


(TRW) 


25.00 


CA2213 


(TRW) 


25.00 


CA241B 


(TRW) 


25.00 



CA2612 (TRW) 


$ 25.00 


CA2674 (TRW) 


25.00 


CA2881-1(TRW) 


25.00 


CA4101 (TRW) 


25.00 


CA4201 (TRW) 


25.00 


CA4600 (TRW) 


25.00 


GD1889 


20.00 


CD2545 


20.00 


CMD514AB 


20.00 


D4959 


10.00 


D4987M 


20.00 


D5147D 


10.00 


D5506 


10.00 


D5827AJ1 


20.00 


DMD6022 


30.00 


DMS-2A-2 50 


40. 00 


HEP76 


4.95 


HEPS 3002 


11.30 


HEPS3003 


30.00 


HEPS3005 


10.00 


HEPS 300 6 


19,90 


HEPS3007 


25.00 


H)-:i'S3010 


11.34 


HTEF2204 H.P. 


112.00 


5082-0112 H.P. 


14.20 


5082-0253 H.P. 


105.00 


5082-0320 H.P. 


58.00 


5082-Q386 H.P. 


POR 


5082-0401 H.P. 


POR 


5082-0438 H.P. 


POR 


5082-1028 H.P. 


POR 


5082-2711 H.P. 


23.15 


5082-3080 H.P. 


2.00 


5082-3188 H.P. 


1.00 


5082-6459 H.P. 


POR 


5082-8323 H.P. 


POR 


35826E H.P. 


POR 


35831E H.P. 


29.99 


35853E H.P- 


71.50 


35854E H.P. 


75.00 


HPA0241 H.P. 


75.60 


HXTR3101 H.P. 


7.00 


HXTR3102 H.P. 


8.75 



HXTR6101/2N6617 H.P. 55.00 



HXTR6104 H.P, 

HXTR6105 H.P. 

HXTR6106 H.P. 

QSCHt995 H.P. 

J02000 TRW 

J0200i TRW 

J 04 04 5 TRW 

K3A 

HA450A 

KA41487 

MA41765 

MA43589 

MA43636 

HA47044 

MA47651 



68.00 
31.00 

33.00 

POR 
10.00 
25.00 
25.00 
10-00 
10,00 

POR 

POR 

POR 

POR 

POR 
25. 50 



Toll Free Number 

800-528-0180 

(For orders only) 



*^AIl parts may be new or 
surplus, and parts may be 
substituted with con^psi^^lsle part^ 
If we are out of atock o^ an Hem." 



PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 

J\I^^I|z elect roi|ics 



134 73 Magazine • July, 1983 



GaAs, TUNNEL DIODES, ETC. 



PART 



PRICE 



PART 



PRICE 



PART 



PRICE 



MA47100 


$ 3- 05 


MRF503 


$ 6.00 


PT4i86B 


S POR 


HA47202 


30.80 


MRF504 


7,00 


PT4209 


FOR 


MA47771 


FOR 


MRF509 


5,00 


PT4209C 


POR 


HA47852 


FOR 


MRF511 


8,65 


PT4566 


FOR 


HA49558 


FOR 


MRF605 


20.00 


PT4570 


FOR 


MB402i 


FOR 


MRF629 


3,47 


PT457I 


POR 


MBDIOI 


i,00 


MRF644 


23,00 


PT4571A 


FOR 


MD0513 


POR 


MKF816 


15,00 


PX4577 


POR 


HHW1171 


42 . 50 


HRF823 


20,00 


PT4590 


FOR 


MHWU82 


48,60 


MRF901 


3.00 


PT4612 


POR 


MHV4171 


49.35 


MRF8004 


2.10 


PT4628 


POR 


MHW4172 


51.90 


HS261F 


POR 


PT4640 


FOR 


t'iHW4342 


68,75 


MT4150 Fair, 


POR 


PT4642 


FOR 


KI.P102 


25.00 


MT5126 Fair. 


POR 


FT5632 


POR 


>IM1 500 


32 . 32 


MT5481 Fair. 


POR 


PT5749 


POR 


MM1550 


POR 


MT5482 Fair. 


FOR 


FT6612 


POR 


MM1552 


50-00 


MT5483 Fair- 


POR 


PT6626 


FOR 


MM1553 


50.00 


MT5596 Fair. 


POR 


PT6709 


POR 


lfKI614 


10,00 


MT5764 Fair, 


POR 


PT6720 


FOR 


MM2 608 


5-00 


MT8762 Fair. 


POR 


PT8510 


POR 


MM3375A 


11.50 


HV109 


.77 


PT8524 


POR 


MM4429 


10.00 


MV140i 


8.75 


FT 8609 


POR 


MM8000 


1,15 


HV1624 


1,42 


PT8633 


FOR 


MM8006 


2-30 


MVI805 


15,00 


PT8639 


POR 


H0277L 


POR 


M?1808 


10.00 


PT8659 


POR 


M0283L 


POR 


MV1817B 


10.00 


PT8679 


FOR 


M03757 


POR 


MV1863B 


10.00 


PT8708 


FOR 


MP 102 


POR 


MV1864A 


10.00 


PT8709 


POR 


MPN3202 


10.00 


MV1864B 


10.00 


FT8727 


POR 


MPN340i 


,52 


MV1864D 


10.00 


PT8731 


POR 


MPN3412 


1-00 


MV1868D 


10.00 


PT8742 


FOR 


MPSU31 


1,01 


MV2101 


,90 


PT8787 


POR 


MRA2023-1-5 


TRW 42 - 50 


MV2111 


-90 


FT9790 


41,70 


MRF2 12/208 


16.10 


HV2n5 


1,55 


PT31962 


FOR 


HRP223 


13-25 


MV2201 


,53 


PT31963 


FOR 


MRF224 


15.50 


MV2203 


.53 


FT31983 


POR 


MRF237 


3, 15 


HV2209 


2.00 


PTX6680 


POR 


MRF238 


12.65 


mr22i5 


2.00 


RAY- 3 


24-99 


MRF243 


25-00 


MWAllO 


7.45 


4008 1 


POR 


MRF245 


34.50 


MWAI20 


7-80 


4028! 


FOR 


MRF247 


34.50 


MWA130 


8,25 


40282 


FOR 


HRF304 


43-45 


m^ A2 1 


7.80 


40290 


POR 


MRF315 


23,00 


MWA220 


8.25 


RFllO 


25.00 


MRF420 


20-00 


MWA230 


8,65 


SCA3522 


POR 


MRF421 


36,80 


MWA310 


8.25 


SCA3523 


FOR 


MRF422 


41-40 


MWA320 


8*65 


SD1065 


POR 


MRF427 


16.10 


KU^A330 


9.50 


SS43 


FOR 


MRF428 


46.00 


«EC57835 


5*30 


TP1014 


POR 


MRF450/A 


13-80 


ON 382 


5.00 


TP1028 


FOR 


MRP453/A 


17.25 


PPT515-20-3 


FOR 


TRW- 3 


POR 


KRF454/A 


19.90 


PRT8637 


POR 


UT0504 Avantek 


70,00 


MRF455/A 


16.00 


PSCQ2-160 


POR 


UT0511 Avantek 


75.00 


MRF4 58 


19,90 


PT3190 


POR 


VI 5 


4. 00 


MRF463 


25.00 


PT3194 


POR 


V33B 


4.00 


MRF472 


1*00 


PT3195 


FOR 


VIOOB 


4.00 


MRF475 


2.90 


PT3537 


FOR 


VAB801EC 


25.00 


MRF477 


11,50 


PT4166E 


FOR 


VAB804EC 


25,00 


MRF502 


1.04 


PT4176D 


POR 


VAS21AK20 


25.00 



Toll Free Number 
800-528-0180 

(For orders only) 



"All parts may t>e new of 
surptys, and p^rls mav be 
substituted witti comparably parts 
rf iM« are out of stock of an iiem." 



(fVI^^I^ electroiycs 

PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



73 Magazine • July. 1983 135 



COAXIAL RELAY SWITCHES SPDT 



Electronic Specialty Ca- /Raven Electrcmlcs 
Part 2SK28 Part i SU--OI 

26Vdc Type N Conaector* DC to 1 CBk* 



FSN 5985-556-96S3 



$49.05 




^ (3^ ^% 



sc 



COM 



NO 



**»• 



*A»t*i i + iv ;'*a»»;c:* j«r74 '^ly s^w i^i 



^ ^ 



1 



Ainphenol 

Part y; 3I6-10102-S 

llSVac Type UNC DC to 3 GHz 



$25.99 



FXR 

Part // 300-11182 

120Vac Type flNC DC to 4 GK^, 

FSN 5985-543-1225 

S39.99 



FXR 

Part itf 300-11173 
l20Vac Type BNC Same 
FSN 5985-543- 1S50 

$39.99 





^i i 




BNC To Banana Plug Coax Cable RG-5B 36 Inch or BNC to N Coax Cable RG-58 36 inch. 



$7.99 or 2 For 513.99 or 10 For $50.00 



$8.99 or 2 For 515.99 or 10 For $60.00 








SOLID- STATE RELAYS 

P&B Model ECT1DB72 
PRICE EAOI ?5.00 

Diglsig. Inc. Model ECS-215 
PRICE EACH $7,50 

Grigsby/Barton Hodei GB74O0 
PRICE EACH 57.50 



Svdc turn on 



5vdc turn on 



5vdc ttim on 



120vac contact at Tampa or 20aiiip5 on a 

lO^x I0"x . 124 alumioura. Heatslnk with 
silicon grease* 

240vac contact lAaiaps or 40anips nn a 

I0*'x 10'*x , 124 aiuniinuBi* Heatsink with 
silicon grease. 

240vac contact at ISantps or 40ainps on a 

10"k 10"x .124 alumlnuni. Heatsink with 
silicon grease. 



NOTEi *** Items may be substituted with other brands ot equivalent model fiumbera. *** 



qM'H; 



elect roiycjii 



**AII parts may be new or 
sufpiu^, ^nd parts may be 
substilul&d lA^tlb comparable parts 
if nvs AiB oul oi stock of an item/' 



Toll FrM Number 
800-52B-0180 
(For ordtrt only) 

PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



136 73 Magazine - July, 1983 



RECALL PHONE MEMORY TELEPHQNE tflta 24 SUHBER AUTO DIALER 

The Recall Phone Telephone employs the late&t stiate of art 
coDtmiml cat Ions techftology. It Is a conthlnatlon telephone 
and automatic dialer that uses premlum-quaUty* solid- state 
circuitr'/ to assure high-reliability performance In persona J 
or buslness^ applic^tionE. $49>99 





T Vtf W 



V 



AROK ALPHA RAPID BONDING GLL*E 



•^ ' ■ 1 r 



bArik^H^ta^^Hi^i 



Super Glue iCIE*486 high strength 
rapid bonding adhesive. Alp ha 
Cyanoacrylate, Set-Tltae 20 to 40 
sec, ,0, 7f 1, oz- C20gm# ) 

$2,00 




TOUCH TONE PAD 

This pad contains all the electronics to 
produce standard touch- tone tones. New 
with data- 







*'i^f^l'^ 



$9,99 or l0/$a9,99 



MITSUHl UHF/VH? VARACTOR TUKER MODEL UVEIA 

Perfect for those unac rambler projects. 
Nev with data^ 




# M 



gl9,99 or iO/$149,99 



INTEGRATED CIRCUIT- 



IC1372P 

MCi358P 

MC1350P 

MC1330A1P 

MC1310F 

MCH96P 

LM565N 

LM380NU 

U11889N 

NE564N 

N£S6m 



Color TV Video Kodulator Circuit. 

IF Anp. t Limit er.fH Detector, Audio Driver, Electronic Attenuatoti 

IF Amplifier 

Low Level Video Detector 

FM Stereo Demodulator 

Balanced Wodu la tot /Demodulator 

Phase Locked Loop 

2Watt Audio Power Amplifier 

TV Video Modulator 

Phase Locked Loop 

Pha^e Locked Loop 



t t« 10 


Hup 


4.42 


$2,95 


5,00 


4.00 


1.50 


1.25 


1,50 


1-15 


4.29 


3.30 


1.50 


1.25 


2,50 


2.00 


K56 


1.25 


5,00 


4,00 


10.00 


8,00 


10.00 


8.00 



FERRANTI ELECTROHICS AM RADIO RECEIV ER MODEL ZN414 INTEGRATED CIHCtrTT, 

^ ^=^ FT-K— ^ > , si «^ , , - . 5 V^^^^H^brih^^^^H 

Features: 

1,2 to 1,6 volt operating range. , Less than 0, Siaa current consumption. ISOKHz to 3SiHz 
Frequency range, , Easy to assemble, no alignment necessary. Effective and variable AGC action.. 
Will drive an earphone direct, Excelleit audio quality ♦, Typical power gain of 72dB* ,T0-18 



package. With data. 


S2.99 or 10 For 524,99 


NI CAD RECHARGEABLE BATTERIES 




AA Battery Pack of 6 These are Factory 




New. $5.00 




Stm C Pack of 10 2.5Antp/Hr- $10,00 




Gates Rechargeable Battery Packa 




I2vdc at 2.5Amp/Hr, $11.99 




12vdc at 5Amp/Hr, $15,99 






(fVi^^Hz elect roi)ic§ 






''All parts may be ne^r or 
surplus, and pafts may be 
^libstttutect with comp^ilkle parts 
it we ate out ot stocJt of an item 



Toll Free Number 
800-528-0180 
(For orders only) 
PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



73 Magazine • July, 1983 137 



"SOCKETS AND CHIMNEYS" 



EIMAC TUBE SOCKETS ^D CHIMNEYS 



SRI 10 

SK300A 

SiC400 

SK406 

SK416 

SK500 

SK600 

SK602 

SK606 

SK607 

SK610 

SIC620 

SK 62 6 

SK630 

SK636B 

SK&40 

SK646 

SK700 

SK711A 

SK740 

SK770 

SKSOQA 

SKd06 

SK310 

SK900 

SK906 

SK1420 

SK1490 



Socket 

Socket For 4CX50DaA«R,J, 4CX10,OOOD, 4CXl5p000A,J 

Socket Fot 4-125A,2S0A,400A,40tK:,4Pftl25A,4O0A,4'500A,5*50tlA 

Chinniey For 4-250A,400A,400C,4PR400A 

Chimney For 3-4002 

Socket For 4«1000A/4FR1000A/B 

Socket For 4CX2 50B.BG,yG,R,4CX350A,F,FJ 

Socket For 4CX2 50&,BC,rG,R, 4CX350A,F,FJ 

Chimney For 4CX250S,aC,FG,R,4CX350A,F,FJ 

Socket For 4CX600J,JA 

Socket For 4CX600J,JA 

Socket For 4CX600J,JA 

Chiamey For 4CX600J,JA 

Socket For 4CX§0OJ,JA 

Chimney For 4CX600J,JA 

Socket For 4CX600J » JA 

Chimney For 4CX600J,JA 

Socket For 4CX300A,Y,4CX125C,F 

Socket For 4CX300A,Y,4CX125C,F 

Socket For 4CX300A,Y,4CX123C ^F 

Socket For 4CX300A,Y,4CXi2SC,F 

Socket For 4CX1000A,4CX1500B 

Chimney For 4CX1000A,4CXI500B 

Socket For 4CXiOOOA,4CXl500B 

Socket For 4X300A 

Chimney For 4X5 OOA 

Socket For 5CX3000A 

Socket For 4CVfl000A 



$poa 

$520.00 

260*00 

74.00 

36.00 

390.00 

5UO0 

73.00 

11 -CO 

60*00 

60.00 

66.00 

10.00 

66*00 

34.00 

36*00 

71.00 

225*00 

225.00 

66.00 

86.00 

223.00 

40.00 

225,00 

300.00 

57,00 

650.00 

385.00 



JOH*NSO« nmE S0CK£TS mU CHIMNEYS 



124-111/SK606 
122-0275-001 
124-0113-00 
124-116/SK630A 
124-1 15-2/SK620A 



Chimney For 4CX250B,8C,FG,R, 4CX350A,F,FJ 

Socket For 3-5002. 4-125A. 250A, 400A, 4-500A, 5-500A 

Capacitor Ring 

Socket For 4CX250B ,BC,FG,R, /4CX350A,F,FJ 

Socket For 4CX250B,BC,FG,R, /4CX350A,F,FJ 

913 Tube Socket 



S 10.00 
Cpalr) 15.00 

15*00 
55.00 
55.00 
20*00 



CHIP CAPACITORS 










*8pf 






iDpf 






lOOpf* 


Ipf 






12pf 






UOpf 


l*lpf 






15pf 






I20pf 


1.4pf 






18pf 






130pf 


L5pf 






20pf 






ISDpf 


l.Spf 






22pf 






leopf 


2.2pf 






24pf 






180pf 


Z.7pf 






27 pf 






200pf 


3.3pf 






33pf 






220pf* 


3.6pf 






39pf 






240pf 


3.9pf 






47pf 






270pf 


4,7pf 






Slpf 






300pf 


5.6pf 






S6pf 






330pf 


6,8pf 






68pf 






360pf 


8-2pf 






82pf 






390pf 


PRICES: 


1 


to 10 - 


*99< 


101 to 


1000 


.60e * 




11 


to 50 - 


■ .90f 


1001 & 


UP 


.35f 




51 
J0H1 


to 100 
^SON WJ- 


- .804 








WATKIKS 


■V907: Voltage 


Controlled Micro 



430pf 

470pf 

SlOpf 

560pf 

620pf 

680pf 

820pf 

lOOOpf/.OOluf* 

1800pf/,001Suf 

2700pf/.0O27Ljf 

10,000pf/.01uf 

I2.000pf/.012uf 

lS,000pf/,O15uf 

I8,000pf/,018yf 

IS A SPECIAL PRICE: 10 for $7,50 

100 for $65.00 
1000 for $350,00 



TUBE CAPS (Plate) 


511.00 
13.00 
14*00 
17.00 ' 
20.00 


HRl, 4 

HR2,3, 6 L 1 
HR5» 8 
HR9 
HRIO 



ive Oscillator $110*00 

Frequency rarvge 3.6 to 4.2GHz, Power ouput» Min. lOdBm typical SdBm Guaranteed. 
Spur i Oils output suppression Harmonic (nf^), min, 20dB typical, In-8and Kon-Hannonic, mtn, 
60de typical, Residual FH, pk to pk, Kax. 5KHz, pushing factor. Max* 8KHz/V, Pulling figure 
(1.5:1 VSWR)» Max. 60MHz, Tuning voltage range +1 to +15volts. Tuning current, Hax. -0,1mA, 
modulation sensitivity range. Max. 120 to 30I^z/V, Input capacitance, Max, lOOpf, Oscillator 
Bias ^'15 +-0.05 volts ^ 55rnA, Majt* 



Toll Free Number 
800-528-0180 
(For orders only) 



''Alt parts ma^ be new or 
surplus, &nd p^rts may be 
siebstltuted with comparable pans 
rl we are out of stock of an item." 



J\I^7|z electroi|ies 



PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



138 73 Magazine • July, 1983 



! 



TUBES 



TYPE 



PRICE 



TYPE 



PRICE 



TYPE 



PRICE 



2E26 


$ 5.69 


KT88 


2K28 


100.00 


DX362 


2X1000/1 


300.00 


DX415 


3B22 


19.75 


572B/T160L 


3B28/866A 


7.50 


S92/3-200A3 


3-500Z 


102.00 


807 


3-lOOOZ 


400.00 


811 


3CX1000A/8283 


428.00 


81 lA 


3CX1500A7/887 


533.00 


SUA 


3X2500A3 


200.00 


813 


3CX3000A7 


490.00 


82 9B 


4~65A/8165 


45.00 


832A 


4-125A/4D21 


58.00 


4624 


4-250A/5D22 


75.00 


4662 


4-400A/8432 


90.00 


4665 


4-400C/6775 


95.00 


5675 /A 


4-1000A/8166 


300. 00 


5721 


4B32 


22.00 


5768 


4E27A/5-125B 


155.00 


5836 


4CS250R 


146.00 


5837 


4X150A/7034 


30.00 


5861/EC55 


4X150D/7035 


40.00 


587 6A 


4X150G/8172 


100.00 


5881 /6L6W 


4X2 508 


30.00 


5893 


4CX250B/7203 


45.00 


5894 /A 


4CX250F/G/8621 


55.00 


5894/B 


4CX250K/8245 


100.00 


5946 


4CX25OR/7580W 


69.00 


6080 


4CX300A/8167 


140.00 


6083/AX9909 


4CX350A/8321 


83.00 


6098/ 6AK6 


4CX350F/J/8904 


95.00 


6115/A 


4X500A 


282.00 


6146 


4CX600J/8809 


607.00 


6146A 


4CW800F 


625.00 


6146B/8298A 


4CXi000A/ai68 


340. 00 


6146W 


4CX1500B/8660 


397.00 


6156 


4CX5000A/8170 


932.00 


6159 


4CX10000D/8171 


990.00 


6161 


4CX15000A/8281 


1260.00 


6291 


4PR60A 


100.00 


6293 


4PR60B/8252 


175.00 


6360 


4PR400A/8188 


192.00 


6524 


5CX1500A 


569.00 


6550 


6BK4C 


6.00 


6JH6 


6DQ5 


5.00 


6JN6 


6FW5 


6.00 


6JS6B 


6GE5 


6.00 


6KG6/EL505 


6GJ5 


6.00 


6KM6 


6HS5 


6.00 


6KN6 


6JB5/6HE5 


6.00 


6LF6 


6JB6A 


6.00 


6LQ6 (GE) 



20.00 


6562/6974A 


$ 50. 00 


50.00 


6832 


22. 00 


50.00 


6883/8032A/8552 


7.00 


49.00 


6897 


110.00 


144.00 


6907A 


75.00 


7.50 


6939 


15.00 


10.00 


7094 


125.00 


15.00 


7117 


17.00 


35.00 


7211 


60.00 


50.00 


7289/3CX100A5 


34.00 


38.00 


7360 


11.00 


28.00 


7377 


67.00 


310.00 


7408 


4.00 


80.00 


7650 


250.00 


585.00 


7695 


8.00 


25.00 


7843 


58.00 


200.00 


7854 


83.00 


85.00 


7868 


5.00 


100.00 


7894 


12.00 


100.00 


8072 


65.00 


110,00 


811 7A 


130.00 


25.00 


8121 


60. 00 


6.00 


8122 


100-00 


45.00 


8236 


30. 00 


50.00 


8295/PL172 


506.00 


60.00 


8462 


100.00 


258.00 


8505A 


73.50 


10.00 


8533W 


92.00 


89.00 


8560/A 


65.00 


14.00 


8560AS 


90.00 


110.00 


8608 


34.00 


7.00 


8637 


38.00 


7.50 


8643 


100.00 


8.50 


8647 


123.00 


14.00 


8737/5894B 


60.00 


66.00 


8873 


260.00 


15.00 


8874 


260.00 


233.00 


8875 


260. 00 


125.00 


8877 


533.00 


12.00 


8908 


12.00 


5.00 


3930/651Z 


71.00 


53.00 


8950 


12.00 


10.00 






6.00 


6LQ6 (Sylvauia) 


7.50 


6.00 


6LU8 


6.00 


6.00 


6LX6 


6.00 


6.00 


6ME6 


6.00 


6.00 


12BY7A 


4.00 


6.00 


12JB6A 


6.00 


6.00 


6KD6 


6.00 


6.00 


6JT6A 


6.00 




6KD6 


6.00 



NOTICE AiL PRICES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE ! IM !! Ill I !! ! ! !! 1 1 1 H 1 1 ! I ! ! ! Ill 1 1 1 1 ! 11! 
TUBES MAY EITHER BE NEW OR SURPLUS CONDITION 1 ! ! ! ! j ! ! ! ; 1 1] n t ! < ! 1 1 ! 1! 1 1 1 1! ! ! ! ! 1 1 1 ! 1 ! 1 1 1! ! ! 11 11 



Toll Free Number 
800-528-0180 
(For orders only) 



"AN parts may be nei^ or 
5urptu$, and parts may be 
su^stituted with cofn parable pans 
tf we are out of stock of an item."' 



^/i^^^T elect roi|ic§ 



PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



73 Magazine • July, 1983 139 



"FILTERS" 



COLLINS Hechanical Filter #526-972^-010 MODEL F^55Z32F 

455KHZ at 3»2KHz wide* May be other models but equivalent* May be used or new, $15,99 

ATLAS Crystal Filters 

5, 595-2. 7/8 A^B, 5.595-2,7A£B 

8 pole 2,7KHz wide U^Jper sideband, Irtfjedence SOOolxns ISpf In/BOOoNns Opf oat. 19>99 

5.595-2.?/8A3# 5-595-2-7/USB 

8 pole 2.7Khz wide l^)per sideband. Ijipedence SOOotos ISpf In/800(^ins Opf out. 19>99 

5. 595-. 500/4, 5.595-.500/VCW 

4 pole 500 cycles wide OT. Impedance SOOohTis 15pf In/800ohms Opf out, 19*99 

9 . OUSB/OT 

6 pole 2.7KH2 wide at 6dB. In^jedance 6S0ohms 7pf In/300ohms 8pf out, C>r-1599H2 19.99 

KOKUSAI ELECTRIC C0> HechonlCQl Filter #nF-455"ZL/ZU'-21H 

455KHZ at Center Breqiiency of 453. 5KC, Carrier Frequency of 455KHZ 2,36KC Bandwidth, 
X3pp&: sidefoani. (ZU) 19,99 

rower sidebard. iZL) 19,99 



»#«•««*•• 



'«#-««»*«-ii-««««»«->ii«««««««#«« •###«###««•»«-«###««*••«»«•*•«*»««• ••*>»««« 



CRYSTAL FILTERS 



NIKKO 


FX-07800C 


TEW 


FEC-103^2 


SDK 


SCH-113A 


TRM^ 


TF-3IH250 


^Ya>/CD 


001019880 


MOTDI^LA 


4B84363B01 


PTI 


53S0C 


Ffl 


5426C 


pn 


1479 


OOrrrECH 


A10300 


FRC 


E31XF-15700 


FILTER 


2131 


*#«««#«4««^«^««»«tt«»«*# 


CERAMIC 


FILTERS 


AXEL 


4F449 


€i£S/rrE 


m-oiA 




•DCF4-12D36A 


mBATA 


BFB455B 




HFB455L 




CFTyi4 5SE 




CFM455D 




CFK455E 




CFU455B 




CFU455C 




CFU455G 




CFU455H 




CFU455I 




CEW455D 




Cro455H 




SFB455D 




SFD455D 




SFE10.7MA 




SFK10,7MS 




sreio . 7m 


NIFPCU 


1F-B4/CFU455I 




rr-B6/cru455H 




IF-B8 




IF-C18 


TOKIN 


CP455VfiFU455K 


MATSOSHIBA EPC-L4 55K 


ll»«#«1l« 4 «#««««•«■««««« 


SPECTRA 


PHYSICS INC. Mod 



7.3MHz 

10.6935MHz 

11,2735MHZ 

CF 3179. 3KH2 

10*7lffz 2pole 15KHZ barriwidth 

ll•7^fi2 2pole I5KHZ bandwidth 

12MHz 2pole 15KHZ bardwidth 

21,4Mlz 2pole 15KHZ bandwidth 

lO.THHz 8pole bandwidth 7,5KHz at 3aB, 5KHz at 6dB 

45mz 2pole 15KH2 bandwidth 

20.6MH2 36KHZ wide 

CF 7.825MHz 



12,6l?C Bandpass Filter 3dB bandwidth 1,6KH2 from ll»8-13.4KHz 

455KH24-2K!i2 bandwidth 4-7% at 3dB 

455KHS'H-1KH2 bandwidth 6dB min 12KH2, 60dB max 36KH2 

455KI12 



$10,00 

10.00 

10.00 

19.99 

5,00 

5.00 

5.00 

5.00 

20.00 

6.00 

10.00 

10,00 



455KHE 

455KHZ -i-S.SKHz at 3dB 
455KHZ 4-7KHZ at 3dB , 
4S5KHZ +-5.5KHZ at 3dB 



-i-8Kil3 at 6dB , +-16KHZ at 50dB 
lOmz at 6dB I 'I-20KHZ at 50dB 
4-8KUZ at 6dB , -H^16KHz at 60dB 
455KH2 4-2KHZ bandwidth -J-lSKIiz at 6dB, 4-30KHZ at 40dB 
455KH2 -I-2KHZ bandwidth -^12,5KHz at 6dB , -^24KHz at 40dB 
455KI]^ -i-lKHz bandvv'idth 4-4.5KHz at 6dB , 4-lOKHz at 40dB 
455KHZ 4-1KH2 bai^iwidth ^3Ki!z at 6dB , 4-9KH2 at 40dB 
455KHZ -i-liaiz bardwidth 4-2KHz at 6dB , -^SKBz at 40dB 
455KR2 4-10KH2 at 6dB , +-20KHZ at 40dB 
455KHZ -I-3KH2 at 6dB , -I-9KH2 at 40dB 
455KHZ 

455KHZ -I-2KFIZ , 3dB bandwidth 4,5KH2 H-UCHz 
10.7MH2 280K3iz -l-SOKllz at 3dB , 650KH2 at 20dB 
10,7l^z 230KHZ 4-50KHZ at 3dB , 570KHz at 20dB 
10.7MHz 
455KHZ -l-lKHz 
455KH2 ^-lKHz 
455KHZ 
455KHZ 

455KHZ ^-2KHz 
4S5KHZ 



10,00 
5,00 

10 . 00 
2.50 
3.50 
6,65 
6.65 
8,00 
2 . 90 
2,90 
2 . 90 
2,90 
2,90 
2,90 
2.90 
2,50 
5,00 
2,50 
2,50 

10.00 
2.90 
2.90 
2.90 

10,00 
5-00 
7.00 



Pa<ER OUTPUT 1.6MJ. 
68K OHM IWVTT BAIXAST 



BEAM DIA, ,75MM 
1000\TC 4-lOOVDC 



BEAM DIR. 2.7MR 
At 3.7MA 



BK\; STARTENG VOLTAGE DC 

$59,99 



RQTRON MUFFIN FANS Model MARK^/HU2A1 

115 VAC 14i^TIS 50/60CPS IMPEI^rCE PB 01U;i3^) -F 

105CFK at 60CPS JHESE ARE NEW 



880M at 50CPS 



$ 7.99 



(flVI^^I|z elect rof|ics 



PRICES SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE 



Toll Free Number 

800-528-01 80 
(For orders only) 



"Ad pans may he new or 
sutpfus. and pans may be 
substituted with comparable parts 
if we are out ot stock of an Item/' 



140 73 Magaime • JuJy, 1993 



HEWLETT PACKARD SIGNAL GENERATORS 



606A 

60eB 
608C 

TS510 
60e£ 

608F 



S12A 
614A 



BlSk/ 
TS405 



615E 
61SB 

&I3C 
620A 

620B 
626A 

8708A 



EWC-10 



ftF-105F 



50KHZ to 55MHZ in 6 bands ^^-11. Output level odi us table O.luv 
to 3V into 50 ohms p Bui It -In crystal call bra tor. 400 -lOOOHz 
modulation. 

Sane as oDove tiut mis frmuency control feoture to oHow 
operation wltJi HP S70SA Synchronizer. 

10MH2 to 480MHz, 0-luV- IV into 50 ohms, AM. CW. or pulse mod- 
ulation, calibrated attenuotor. 

lOMHz to 42011Hz. 0.1UV-0.5V tnto 50 ohiTis.+-0. 5S occurocv. 
built-in crystal calibrator, AW-CW or pulse output. 



fmoroved version of popular 608CJJd 
stQbUttyi-low res I duo 1 FM. 



to IV outDUtJim) roved 



imii to 455nKz in 5 bonds ^--12 freouency accyrocy with 
built-in crystoJ coHbrator.Con be used with HP 8708A 

Synchronizer, Output continuously adjustoble from ^luv to 
.5V Into 50 ohfns. 

450-1250MHI ,o.luV-0*5V Into 50 ohms.collbroted OUtDUt. 

9O0-210OWHZ wtth many feo tores Including coUbrQEed outmJt 
ond oil modulotion choracterlstlcs. 

Direct reodlng and direct control from 1.8 to 4,2GHz, The 
H.P.616A features +-l*5dB calibrated output accurocy from 
-5127dBm to 'dSfn^The output is directly calibrated In fnlcro- 
volts ond dBfn with continuous fnonl taring, Slmole operotlon 
freauency dlad accuracy Is +-1^ and stool I! ty exceeds 0-005^- 
/ C change In ambient temperature. Coilbrated attenuator Is 
within -5-1. 5dB over entire output bond* 50 ohm impedance unit 
hos internal pulse modulation Nitb reo rote vorioble from 40 
Hz to AKHz^ variable pulsewidthd to IOu$ec)and vortoble ouise 
delav(3 to KiOusecK Externa I modulotino inputs increas ver- 
satility. 

Some OS above but loter modeL 

3.B to 7.6GHz range. with calibrated output and selection of 
pulse-FfI or sauare wave modulation, 

Scne as o&ove but later model < 

7 to USttz ronoe^wtth calibrated cutout and selection of 
pylse-FH or sQuare wove niodulotlon. 

Some as a&ove but later model, 

10 to 15&Hz^lOmw output power with calibroted output and 
pulse-square wove or FH modulation. 

Synchronizer used witn 6O6B,608F*The synchronizer is o 
phase- lock Frequency stabilizer which provides crystol- 
oscillator frequency stability to ^30HHz in the 608F slgnol 
generator* Phose locking eliminates microphonics m6 drift 
resulting in excellent freauency stobility^The 3708A includes 
a vernier whicii^ con tune the reference oscillator over o range 
of * -0.251 permitting frequency settoblllty to 2 parts In 10 
to the seventh/Provides a very stable signal that satisfies 
many crlticol applications. 

(Witn HP 606B or 608F1 

(Without) 

ELECTROftiaiCS EMC'IO RFI/Efll RECEIVER 

Low freauency onalyzer covering 20Wz to SOKttz frequency 

range* Ex tendoiDle to 500 KHz In widetKmd n»de. 

Empire Devices Field Intensity fleter. 

Has NF-105/TA,NF-105/TX.NF-105/T1,NF-105/T2.NF-105/T3. 
Covers 14f(HZ to lOOOHHz. 

ALL EQUIPMENT CARRY A 50 DAY GUARANTEE. 
£QUIPf€NT IS HOT CALIBRATED, 



$ 550*00 

moo, 00 

S 500.00 
S 375.00 
S14S0.00 



$1100.00 
» 750.00 

t 500,00 



$ 575.00 
I 600.00 

$ 500.00 
$2200*00 

* 750. tM) 
$2200.00 

$(4200.00 



S 350. 
% 450.00 



I2S0O.OO 



$2100,00 



onpentivG iiiSTiiucfiOia 
OEFlCTlVE MATERIAL: An claims fv at^*c:>,* mMmt'^* ^vIt bm midv tntnm usi^ ftOt An itt*/ p«c«iipt of 
p«Tc:0^ *11 ti*in^« Tiucf in^^vM 11^ d«f*cii vi miiarktf (Tot tttKng putpcMtJ our invoitt n<jm[»i, and iti4 d#i* 

OELEVEnV: Ordifi »ne normaiiy iihipped wiiNn 4«. hoijts fift^r ^«C«lpl 0* cuPtom^t'c ond«r It i pgrc hni \o C4 
bAChc^rderiKlthiicustDrTiar itriodried Our natm«J snipping rriaihgd is vii f\ti^ Ci»iS Mill -or UP5 depending Dn 
ute unu iM<.{]hF 01 tha puckigt Qn i«tl equjprTvenl l-i ii by Air on-iy ^08 ■ni|iplr>g poini 

FOREkON OnOER^^ All lorv<Qn grd««3 rtnalt IH putfMU *lth ciintftf t tr»Kk Qf monor WIS** ntAdt Qui m U & 
^wtftds^ wa V mofTy out C O D ■• ^^st ii^i' aa^tio lonign eatiiiiMftaa^ Leitari ot Oreoit ti* not «n «cceDtai9f« 

*i3*^ ci' Dtfmtni trttwr Fwftt^*'' in'^rra:;i4^' m ■vafk^AiiiA m^ma. 

HQunS: MonMf fvu StltviUtf tJQ i^^ te &U0 e<.Tn. 

WMRANCt: ^ UK incLwd* eS« *V each lAiaional 1100 m Dv*rilOO 00. UflilM VwiSt* V^ 

OAOER FORHl: New Qfdef f6fini v* if^lu^M wittt aacn ofOiT lor yow conn^ihEf^ce Ac){Miflnai Sannt ttv 

ivaiiablfl -01 raguaal. 

POST A Q E; Mm i m um eH i p-pf ng md hand 1 1 na I n i h« US. Cinidt, i nu Ma » jco 1 1 12.50 al i o l:ha( cou ntifhai i ■ 10.00. 
On roreign ofOtft include 2Q*/t irvippincf and Kar^diing. 

PREPAID OnD£l^$: Ordar mwit be accorrfpiriied by scrMcn 

PRFCES: Pf'cn ve luQiKl to tl^enQv wilft^ut nolica. 

IIE5TQCK CHAfiaE: If »l1l V «tlim»fl t^ MHZ EI«C^OfVC » due lo Cultonncr efrw, CU4KirneF mU tM fWfl 

fMp0^ntki«^Dr all dire feel wilMclura*daiS%reatoGkirtflf«iL»<inihtf«mwfvi*r<flcwti.ioni);r Ai^iiuffli 

iAl£S TAX. AfOtmi: m^et AM 1^ n*^9w Te*. ui^ms e 9ipi>«0 Anmna iveaw tm* card le CuTenUy on iile «>1fi 
VH£ El»clran4ci An orOn piiieiAl ^v pArta^f^i outi^de oi AnmiK, bul d#Mv«f*d to pa^iofti m Arjuxift at* auli- 
FKt to im 9"^ MiH Ux. 

SNORTAQE OR DAMAQEl Ail clflma is^ thio'ii^vs or dimigei mufti be nnid-s winNr^ 5 deyl «Mflr rei:ilpi aC 
pirce^ Cimlmi rr^iuil indude ouf ^flvolqt ftum&er intf Iha dili 0^^ purthne Cualomari which do nol npiify u-e 
withifi l^ii tlrtii ^nod WIN be n*ld nesiwrtiltsle tor e?i« anlite o^d^r «g wb VfHi csnelder ma orda^ complaie 

OUR aOO MiiMBf ft IS STRiCTLr FOR ORDERS 0^1.^ 
NO INfOflMATFON WLL Bi GIVEN i ^SatSSft-O rSO 



TERMS DOMESTIC Prepsifl. COO DrCr«di1 C*nl 

FOflEiGN Prtpaid only, us Fundt— money ofdtr or MshiBT* check only. 
C.O.&.: Accepiame &y Taiephona or mail. Paymoni iram cuftiomer will tm cay tash, money ortier &r ciahier's 
Chech. Wa ire aorry bul we cennol accepi personal checkt for C.O.D-'s. 

CONFtRMiNGORO^nS; We woyiO prefer tfi^T con inrnmg Ofdtrs not be *inl lUe^ a leiiohona ordof hM been 
placed- 1' corn p any policy neceiemifiiaeonMrmmfl order. pJeaasmaf* -COtiFIRMING" froidiiiy on ihe order 
If prat}'«m« c flapiicaie snifunefiti occur dud lo an o*d*r which is n«t propvly m^rhec), cusiomwr* miU be 
heia r»*p«ns*blt (o* iny chjirqei ^«urT*d, p*ut 1 15% 'BiioeJK chArQe on retumwj pArtm 
CRiDTT CARD«: WE ACCEPT HASTEIICAMI VllA AHU AieERlCAM EXraC5& 
OAf A SMEETSi Wri«n we rtaae d«U tl««i» ^n etocK o*^ Sevcea i*re uq luppiy tl»m wim Iha ordw. 



(^«IU 




elect raf^eit 



f^4fl 



(602} 242 303? 
{S02} 242'8ft16 

2111 W. CAMELS ACK ROAD 
PHOENIX, M^aOHA &5015 

T«ll FrH NumMf 
{For OT^tt only) 



''AM parifi may be new or 
surplus, and parts may be 
substituted with cofnparable parts 
if yve ar^ out oF stock of an item." 



I 



^Se^ Lntof Advert tBers on page ti4 



73 Magazine • July, 1983 141 



NEW LOW-NOISE PREAMPS RECEIVING CONVERTERS TRANSMIT CONVERTERS 



Mew iow-noisa microwave transistors make 
preamps in the 0.9 to 1.0 d8 noise figure 
range possible without the Fragility and power 
supply problems of gas-fet's. Units furnished 
wired and tuned to ham band. Car be easily 
retuned lo nearby f req. 




j Models iNA< h 
P30. and P432 
shown 



Modef 

LNA 2a 
LIMA 50 
UNA 144 
LNA 220 
LNA 432 



Tunabte 
f req Rangg 

20-40 

40-70 
130-180 
180-250 
38O-470 



Nolsfl Figure 

0,9 dB 
0.9 dB 
lOdB 
1.0 dB 
1.0 dB 



Gain Prtce 



20 dB 

£0da 
tans 

17dB 
18ctB 



S39.95 
S3995 
S39.e& 
S39,d5 
$44 95 



ECONOMY PRE AM PS 



Our traditronaf preamps, proven in years of 
service. Over 20.000 in use throughout the 
world. Tuneable over narrow range. Specify 
exact freq. band needed. Gain 16*20 dB, NF = 
2dBorfess. VHF units available 27 to 300 MHz. 
UHF units available 300 to 650 rviHz. 

• P30K, VHF KJt less case Si 4,95 

• P30a VHF Kit viflth case S20.95 

• P30W, VHFWired/Tested $29.95 

• P432K, UHF Kit less case $18.95 

• P432C, UHF Kit with case $24.95 

• P432W, UHFWired/Tested $33.95 

P432 also available in broadband version to 
cover 20^50 MHz without tuning. Same price 
as P432; add "B" to mod^l #. 



HELICAL RESONATOR 
PRE AM PS 





Our lab has developed a new line of low^noise 
receiver preamps with helrcal resonator filters 
built in. The combination of a low noise amplifier 
similar lo the LNA series and the sharp selectivity 
of a 3 or 4 section helical resonator provides 
increased sensitivity while reducing intermod 
and cross-band interference in critical apph- 
cations. See selectivity curves at right Noise 
figure - 1 to 1.2 dB, Gain - 12 to 15 dB. 



r^^odel 

HRA*144 
HRA*220 
HRA-432 



Tuning Range 

143-150 MHz 
213-233 MHz 
420-450 MHz 



Price 

S49,95 
S49.95 




Models to cover every practical rf S if range to 
listen to SSB, FM. AIV, etc NF = 2 dB or less. 



VHF MODELS 

KJt S44,95 

Less Case S39,95 

Wired S59.95 



Antenna 
[nput Range 

26-32 

50-52 

50-54 
144-146 
145-147 
144-144,4 
t4&'14fi 
144-146 
220-222 
220224 
222-226 
220-224 
222-224 



Receiver 
Output 

144-148 

se-30 

144-t4S 
2S-30 
26-30 

27-27.4 
2fi*30 
SO-M 
2S-30 

144^143 

144-1 4S 
50-54 
26-30 



UHF MODELS 

Kit $54.95 

Less Case £49.95 

Wired $74.96 



432-434 
435-437 
432 43$ 
432-436 
439,25 



26-30 
26-30 
144-146 
50-54 
61.25 



SCANNER CONVERTERS Copy 72-76. 135* 
144. 240-270. 400-420. or 806-894 MHz bands 
on any scanner, Wtred/tested Only S79*95. 

SPECIAL FREQUENCY CONVERTERS mad© 
to custom order $1 19.95. Call for details. 



SAVE A BUNDLE ON 
VHF FM TRANSCEIVERS! 



FM'5 PC Board Kit - ONLY $159.95 

complete with contfois, heaisink, etc. 
10 Watts, 5 Channels, fof 6M. 2M, or 220 





^ <S ^ 



Cabinet Kit, complete 
with speaker, knobs, 
connectors, hardware* 
Only S59.95 



( 

I ' 



While supply 
lasts, get $59/95 
cabinet kit free when 
you buy an FM-5 Transceiver kit 
Where else can you gel a complete transceiver 
for only SI 59.95? 



Call or Write for FREE CATALOG 

(Send $1 .00 or 4 IRC'c for overseas mailing) 
Order by phone or mail • Add $2 S & H per order 
(Electronic answering service evenings & weeicends) 
Use VISA, MASTERCARD, Check, or UPS COD. 



For SSS, CW. ATV. FM, etc. Why pay big 
bucks for a mult i mode rig for each t>and? Can 
t>e linked with receive converters for 
transceive. 2 watts output. 



For VHF, 
Model XV2 
Kit S79:95 
Wired S1 19.95 
(Specify band) 



Exciter 
Input Range 

23-30 

2329 

28*30 
27-27.4 

29-30 

50-54 
144-146 

50-54 
144 146 



Antenna 
Output 

1 44' 1 4S 
I4^t46 

50-52 
144-t44.4 
£20-222 
220-224 

5052 
144-148 

28-30 



For UHF, 
Model XV4 
Kit S99.95 
Wired $149.95 



28-30 
23-30 

6T.25 
144-148 



432-434 
435-437 
432-436 
43925 
432'43e* 



-Add $35 for 2M input 




For limit ed t^me, 
buy a transmit converter 
above with 40-45 W PA 
($129.95) and get S39.95 
cabinet FREE. 




LOOK AT THESE 
ATTRACTIVE CURVES! 



■ 












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H144 R R220 Front Ends. HRA 144^220. & HRF'144/220 













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R45 1 Rec«^ver Front Entf 



Typicai Sefecitvity Curve* 
ai RecBJVBrs and 





BcvT 1-F SelecUyi!¥ 










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HRA-432. HRF-432 



ronics, inc. 



65- W MOUL RD. • HILTON NY 14468 

Phone: 716-392-9430 

Hamtronics ^ S$ a rBgi$ter0fl trademark >^33 




For years, Hamtrontcs * 

Modules have been used by 
individuBf hams and manufac- 
turers to make repeaters. Now, in 
the Hamtronics tradition of top 
quality and superb value, we are proud 
to offer a complete repeater package. 



JUST LOOK AT THESE PRICES! 



Baod 



440 



S595 

se45 



Wired/Tested 

S745 
$7d5 



CALL OR WRITE FOR COMPLETE DETAILS- 

Afso Bv&i}&bi& tOf rBmaie sffe finkfng/crossband & fOM, 







I 



FEATURES: 

• SENSlTiVlTV SECOND TO NONE; TYPICALLY 
0.15 uV ON VHF. 0.3 uV ON UHF 

• SELECTrVITY THAT CANT BE SEAT! BOTH 

e POLE CRYSTAL FILTER d CERAMIC FILTER FOR 
GREATER THAN 100 dB AT ± 12KHZ. HELJCAL 
RESONATOR FRONT ENDS, SEE R144, R220, 
AND R451 SPECS IN RECEIVER AD BELOW. 

• OTHER GREAT RECEIVER FEATURES: FLUTTER- 
PROOF SQUELCH. AFC TO COMPENSATE FOR 
OFF-FREQ TRANSMITTERS. SEPARATE LOCAL 
SPEAKER AMPLIFIER & CONTROL. 

• CLEAN, EASYTUNE TRANSMITTER; UP TO 20 WATTS OUT. 



HIGH QUALITY MODULES FOR 
REPEATERS, LINKS, TELEMETRY, ETC. 



INTRODUCING — 
NEW 1983 RECEIVERS 




R144/R220FMRCVRSfor2Mor220MHz. 
0. 1 5u V sens.; 8 pole xtal filter & ceramic filter 
in K hellcat resonator front end for exceptional 
setectfvlty (curves at left). AFC IncL. xtal oven 
avail. Kit only $119.95 

R451 FM RCVR Same but for uhf. Tuned line 
front end. 03 uV sens. Kft only $1 19.95. 

R76 FM RCVH for tOM, 6M, 2M, 220. or 
commercial bands. As above, but w/o AFC or 
hel. res. Kits only SI 09.95. 
Also avarl w/4 pole filter* only 394.95/ kit. 



R11 VHF AM RECEIVER kJUorVHFaircmft 
band or ham bands. Only $04.95 

R110 UHF AM RECEIVER for UHF uses, 
including special 259 MHz model to hear 
SPACE SHUTTLE- Kit S94.95 



I 





HELICAL RESONATOR FILTERS available 

separately on pcb w/connectors. 

HRF-144 for 143-160 MHz $34.96 
HRF-220 for 213-233 MHz $34.05 
HRF-432 for 420^450 MHz $44.95 

(S^e miectivity curv&s atfoft^ 




COR KITS With audio mixer and speaker 
ampltfier. Only $29.95. 

CWID KITS 153 bits, field programmable, 
clean audio. Only $59,95. 

DTMF DECODER/CONTROLLER KITS. 
Control 2 separate on/off functions with 
loucti tones', e.g.. repealer and auto patch, 
Use with main Of aujt, receiver or with Auto- 
patch. Only 589.95. 

AUTOPATCH KITS. Pf ov^de repeater auto- 
patch, reverse patch, phone I me remote 
control of repeater* secondary coniro) via 
repeater receiver. Many other features. 
Only S89.95. Requires DTMF Modofe. 

A1 6 RFTIGHT BOX Deep drawnalum. case 
with light cover and no seams. 7x8x2 inches 
Only $13.00, 



TRANSMITTERS AND 
ACCESSORIES 




TS1 VHF FM EXCtTER for 10M, SM, 2M, 
220 MHz or adjacent bands. 2 Walts confirm 
uous. Kits only $59.95 




C' 



fsk 










T4S1 UHF FM EXCITER 2 to3 Watts on 450 
ham band or adjacent. Kits only S69:95. 

VHF& UHF LINEAR AMPLIFIERS, Use on 

either FM or SSB. Power levels from 1 to 45 
Watts to go with exciters S xmtg converters- 
Kits from S69.95. 



mlronics 



^33 



!S SMCmUSn • CUSIKiUIFT • MIMIC • HRM HCV * HUSnai • HV-OfllN - ICOM • IfflN^ 

, 5 

ICOMI Model IC-R70 General-Coverage Receiver 




B 

41 




NOW! A COMMERCIAL GRADE Communications 
Receiver That Everyone Has Been Asking For... 
At A Price You Can Afford! 



■l«ljhv 






fO^Amti 



Had* knvit [*?—-- 



M 







fL w ^ 



i . UkTlJl r.,lH|»f 



QQ ' 



- c : 



Vt-mO-immt^ 







^03Bp 



SfMKlronkcS ib p-roud and excil«d to arifi survey fCOM'$ \&tg nunoi&i and •AiitJMl pro1«&^il43lill 
g«n«nJ eovCHVQt neceiver. It^i IC-R70. 

It f««tures mom UincMons. mtn ait\m less topiusticaiad 9«n«cBt cow«i«(^ r^cB^^r^ on the 
ii«sii(9l; features ihat the %«riOus s4«drtwttv4 I1tt»ner of him opm^tm vvoyid #ani. »ucrt as 
squfitcit on siae&und, adiustftblft w>diti noisft oi^nk^r. adjustable speed AGC, pfi&sband tuning 
ss stafKlard, and adju^fttabCe ir^ieh filter as 9ian<dafd 

Olhisf conven^eriit feniyrts are high siabiliiy. synt^esljed tunhng and 3 tuning speeds, oplionai 

AM/Fiw mode, variable CW filler widths, dial loch, two VFO's with data tmnsfer, p^ua many 
OlhtirB, Also, rhfl IC'R70 will cipsnale Tranacelva with the IC-730A, making on ideal combination 
for the serious DX'r qr CVy buff. 

GENERAL COVERAGE RiCEPTfON AT ITS ftEST LiSlen \o iht world 0^ HF *ith 1h« HTO, a 
lOOKH; to 30MHz commerciad grade rm^tv^T destined by ICDM tncDrporal«d. Ihe leader ir> ad- 
vsneed lec^^ef design. BiJilt from knowiiKlge gained by designing recetveta t(K edmrnerctai 
marifB, and amateur u^, the R70 surpasses othof rec«r«r$ on the mwiiei...evflii rsca^vers 
casting more than iwice as mucft 

Uliljiirig IQOM's tJFM (OirBct Feed Mixert ttm R70 1^ a receiver which Jn rKyir^ uug* ts vir- 
tually imniune Id mtefmodulaiion distortion Of cross modulation, vei %tm maintains tuperlor 
sensitivity. Whei har you art a Short Wave Listerwr, Amaiaur Radio Operafor, Mafltime operator 
Of ctofnmGFdiar usfir. the fi70 provides the Features voo need, 

DESIGN The R70 inc'^rporaiss an UP convsfsicjri system, utHlling i direcl lefl<i mixef provan to 
be ihfl best de&ign tor mlnlmlzmg inHerfenence from strong adjacent signaift, A preamp \n. pro- 
yldod forrna1<lng iho weakest of sfanals readaWo High qrade tH^ers in conluncllon wilh Ihebuni- 
\n PBT tpa&s bjjnd tunirig) syalfifn and notch tiller, provide tha uitlmate kn interference rejection. 
Selftc table AGC (fastysJOA^oft^, noise blanker (ivjde or mar row (, and lone conirQl improve 
feadabiiiiy under the worsr condilions. An A0C derived squelch, opecatrva *n all modes, adds to 
operalmg easa. 

t>ual VFOs with three runing rales p^rcFV«0e Quick QSY irrequency chan^^ memory ttrf an *n** 
E>ortant s^ttoh. or by eqyaliiing the VFO's (A» Bf, a digitat RIT 13 6 VDC og«r«tk>n is pidvided as 
an 0£»tioi\ 117 VAC is star>dard 

SWL — For (he short wan^ liateher. the readout leciion at the flIXD grves ail ttm infi3fmatM>n tor 
tog^gmg a stationi to tw retumed to at a Later limt Freauen<;y. mode, VFO, a ignal strength are all 
dtaplayed. A dial loch prevenn accidental lo9« of a signal 

A ffont mounted speaker provides 3 «ati3 o' crisp cteaf audto. A record jaclt allows easy 
aftachment of a tape recorder. 



S 



SPECIFICATIONS 

Fr^uency CovetaQa: lOOKHj 30MHz. Hacalvlng Modest SSB fA3JK CWtAIJ. nTTY(Fl). AM(A3). -FM{f3j R»cahi»f Typa: SSB, CW. RTTY, AM ■ double con^rsicn 
superhetfodyne 'ft* Tnpte cortvefsioi^ IF FreQuendet 1st 70 45 15MH;. 2nd - SB- - -SOIiSMHi. CW, RTTY f .OlOSMHi, AM, "FM SOlOOMHz |>BT ■ 455KH2L 3rd p 'FM 
-455KH2 Seiwtthrltr SSe GW, flmr 16*1 V for 10 dB SfN HOO^tHjr l 6MHz - luV roxlOdS S^W. AM -D.SuV tor lO dO S/N "FM -0.3SuV for iZ dB SfNAO {1 6 - 30 MHz cmtv) 
Selectf^lty: SSB, €W, ftTTT: 2.3 KHz « ^B«^KHi ««0dfi CWN, RTTY-li: 300 m « -6d&1.5 KHi @ -SOdB AM: GKH? ^ 4d&ieKHz « ^«OdB FM: t^KMz « -6dB/25KHi a 
«)dB Stability; * 500Hz over -tO» to +fiO*C £^2!SIH£ IrOm t min ti» 1 1w. after ^m o*i. ^50 Hz tn«r»tftet Spurtout Flespontet: ^Od B down Dynamic H»nam' 100 d8 gs 500Hz tF 
aanflwr^ih PBT RaiVe: SSB, CW RTTY * t 8 KHz AW *3 3KH2. Rrr Rsnge; *«» Hz tiom cantef posmon Wolch Depth: 30dB Audio Power 3 wattt into $ ohmi wnh 10% 
dJSionion i5 8 watts ►nto 4 ohms). Fowsr Stipptf: Byilt in AC type for 100. 1 17, 220 10 240 voftS - 10% (50*0 Hz}, 13 8V ± lS*i DC suppty capabititv 01>1ionai Weigh h 16 2B Ibs. 
Site; 1tJ5{n 92>"W x 4 33^5 or K i 10 &6li2.5SrD A«lim»1inpe(iai>ce: 50ohm$ (lOOKHj- 1, 6MHz a long *ife »» used ^ rermmal la provided! Owimfe Chassis is at around poten 
tjal, ground lug provided Power Contumpiian: AC, Volume m.nlmum 24VA (20W1; AG, Volume max. 30VA mm. DC. Volume m(n. 07A; DC. Volume max i OA Opinting 
TampSfatura Ranges ' 10"^ to +60*^0. k w 



-r^ rvnr^i-n CALL OR WRITE. MASTER CARD. VtSA. MONEY ORDERS, PERSONAL CHECKS TAKE 3 WEEKS 
TO ORDcR: TO CLEAR. ACCEPTED. INTERNATIONAL ORDERS WELCOME. PLEASE REQUEST PRO FORMA 

INVOICE. ILLINOIS RESIDENTS ADO 6% SALES TAX. 

HOURS: MON. THRU WED. 9:30-6:00, THURSFRl, 9:30-8:00. SAT 9:30-3:00 

STOP BY AND VISIT WHEN IN THE CHICAGOLAND AREAU 



S 



M 

IP 



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• 

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rs[ns3u the first name in Counters ! 



9 DIGITS 600 MHz $129 




(~t W K^L W di> piFti mr 



TTk CT-9C) i^ the taasi vef^aljk, feature packed counter svailsbk im less 
yiaFiS.tOO-PO! AdvAiurcddeiign feirurci include: three fclectsbk gatr limes, 
nine digits^ &Btji! JndiiCflt£>r ami Ji unique dii^play hold runciion which hold^ the 
di^plnyed cokini «/ttf E.he mpuT signal is remaved! Also^ a t DmHz TC XQ time 
b«$e ii u£^ wkich enables eaiy zem beitcalibf^tipin checks an^nNi WWV. 
Optitinallv: »o intemaJ nk»d battery p»cteJiiemaJ time biAe inpuiaod Mucto- 
pott'tf high subiltiy cry^Ul oven tnOA base are Available. The CT-90. 
peirfcrmiiii«e yiw can couoi oqC 



SPECIFICATIONS: 



WIRED 



Scitiit]vii7 
RfsoluiJom 



Dispiay: 
Tuns banc 



20 HjlodOO MHi 

Le^K ihBii 10 MV lo 150 MHz 

Lets ihan 50 MV to 500 MHi 

0.1 H!!(]0 MM? range) 

10 Hz (60 MH£ rangtj 

10.0 HzC&OO MHi ran^) 

9 digits 0.4" LEO 

Sujklard'lO.OOO aiH^ LO ppoi 2040 C 

OptiooaJ Mi^rQ- power crh cA^. I pipcn 30-40 C 

MS VAC « 250 ma 



7 DIGITS 525 MHz $99 



WIRED 




SPFCtFICATTONS: 



ftanit 
Scroll IV iiy^ 

ResoluUon: 



Display: 
Time base 
Power 



20 Hf TO 515 MHi 

Lett thanSOMVw 150 UHi 

Lets ihan 1 50 MV to 500 MHi 

JO Hi 1 5 MHr rang*:^ 

10-0 Hi (50 MH/ range) 

100.0 Hz (500 MH^rflflgfi) 

7 diiiE$0.4' LED 

LO ppm TCXO 20-40 C 

12 VAC* 250 mt 



The CT-TO breaks the puce tamer oo lab quality frequmcf ftxisu^rt, 
Deluxe features such a:^ three Frequency raD^ct each vt ithprt airipljljcaljoii, 
dual icleciable gale time% and fate acbvU^ indicction make measurements a 
fnap. The wi^ frequency range e rubles you to accurBtety measure ^gnali 
from audio thru UHF with 10 ppm accuracy- that s. 0001%? The CT 70 is 
the answer [o all your measurement needs, in the field, leb cir ham shack 



PRTCESc 

CT'70 wired I yearwimnfy 199.95 

CT-*^ K [1. 90 diy pans ^ mi- 

ranty 84 .W 

AC-1 AC idapler 13S 

BP-1 Nicadpack + AC 

■dapier/ charger 12,95 



7 DIGITS 500 MHz $79^5 




WIRED 



MIM 100 winsd. I year 

wajnitty S79.95 

AC Z A^- •Afepter for MIN I- 

100 J.95 

BP-2 Nicdd paa aivJ AC 

adapter/ charger 12.95 



Hcre"i a handy, general purpose counter that provide* rnost ccsunter 
hinctjoiis at ui unbelievable price. The MINI- 100 doesn^l have the ^11 
frequency raji|^ or ijiput uspedance qualifies found ui hifber price unit^ but 
Tar basic RF sifna] measurements, ti caA't be beat! Accurate meawrementi 
can be made from 1 MHi all the wiy up to JOO MHf with cxceUcnl scnsittvity 
throughdui the range, and the two gate times lei you select ihe reso^utxin 
desired. Add the nicad pack option and the MINI- 100 niaJte$,an ideal addilj on 
lo your tool box for"inhthe*-neid" frequency checks and repairiL 



SPECIFICATIONS^ 



Range 

Sensing t!V- 
RnohitiPfi: 

Di.&pUyi 
Time b8s«: 
Powei: 



] MHz to 500 MHx 
Le^i (han 25 MV 
100 Hz (slow gate) 
l.Q KHziTasi iflie} 
7 digits, 0.4" LED 
2.0 ppm 20-40 C 
5 VDC (6 200 m* 



8 DIGITS 600 MHz $159 




WIRED 



specifk:atiqnSt 



Rarvge. 
Sensitivity! 

ResotutiofE 

Dijipiayr 
Time base 
Power 



20 H2 to 600 MHz 
Less than 25 mv (o 1 50 MHi 
heisk Lhaft ^50 mv 10 500 MHi 
f.O Hum UHi rai^l 
10.0 Hf 16OO MHz rmi^) 
8 diiitfO.4' LED 
iO ppm 20-40'C 
110 VAC or 12 VDC 



TheCT $0 is a versatile lab bench counter that mil noLcasure uptobOO MHz 
with 8 digit preciskm. And one of its beH fcalurf s is the Recetve Frequency 
AdapteTn which turns the CT-50 iaia a digttal readout Tor any leceiver- The 
■dapLsr I) ca^dy pr^^jgrammed for an}' receiver and a simple cotineaian to the 
ttsxjv^ft VFO Es all [hat 11 required fdt use Adding the receiver adapter ia no 
way limits the tipcrainthn of the CT-SO* the adapier caA be cf^vemenlly 
iiw Itched on or off, TKe CT-50, a counter that can work double- duty! 



o«, 



f**i*» 



^t;» 



CT-50 wued, I year warranty 
Cr-50 Kit 90 day parts 

wanaitty 

RA- 1 . recctver adapter bit 

RA-] wired and pre- pTDfram- 

med f send copy of receiver 

icbemttic) 



$159 95 

119 95 
14.95 



29,95 



DIGITAL MULTIMETER $99^ 




WIRED 



fRiCAiS^ 




DM-7iX» ijured, 1 yeai wamnly 


S9^.Q5 


DM-700 Kit. 90 day parts 




wBrTaniy 


T9 95 


AC-1. AC adaptor 


i9S 


BP-Jf, Nfcad pact +AC 




adapter charger 


1995 


MP-i Pntbc yt 


2.95 



The t>M-700 uifer* profesimna^ qualitv performance at ■ hobby b* price. 
F?^iiture« include; 26 Jiffcrent mngev and 5 functionN^, all nrr^ini^cJ \n a 
convenienr, easy co use Ibrmai, Mea«uTcmen» urc disifilived ii,>ri a lariie 11^ 
iJMrit,. y^. Intih LED readoui wirh autofliatic decimal nlacrmefiE. a^utumatic 
polarttv. overrAnijtr itulicanon and ova'taad pruttfcuon uprL> L 250 vultitm all 
ranss. nukmi; tt viitually Qoot'^pronif' The DM<70li^ Loo4tsicrej4. a kanilKxnr^ 
jci hlaclk, ni^ed A8S 'cmc wish convenient retractable tih bail nuJ(e» rt wi 



SPECIFtCATlONS: 

DC/ACvalis: lOOuV to I KV, 5 ranges 

DC AC 

0.1 uA to 2.0 Ampv 5 ranges 

0, 1 ohms to 20 Megohms. 6 ranges 



currenc 

Resistance: 

Input 

brtpedaflee 

Accuracy; 

Power 



to MefDhms. DOAC volts 
0J% basic DC «iil& 
4 C ceUs 



AUDIO SCALER 



For h^ resotitikm audio nmsurememji, multiplies 
UPm frequcscy. 

• Ore it for PL tone* 

• Muliiphes by 1 or 100 

• 0.01 Hz resolutKM^ 

S29.95 kn *39.95 Wired 



ACCESSORIES 

Telescopic whip antenna BNC plug 

High mipedance pyobe. light loading 
Lo* pas* pTube, fof audio rn«*Hiremetiu 
Dtred pr^ibe. geDent purpow usage 

Tdibaii fof CT70. 90. M!NL100..„ 

Color bunt catibratiqn unil, calfbiateb counter 
against ^oV>f TV sigTinl . r , 



. * f h < . 4 /p^^ 

\\ 15.95 

15.95 

12.95 
3.95 

14.95 



COUNTER PREAMP 

Fnr mexnintif: enrremelv weat i^mab fwism 10 to I SSCO 
MH:. Small ^ce. jKfmxf^ Hp pluf fTan*ti»rTneT-mciuded- 

• Ftal 25 db gain 

» BNC Cooocdors 

9 Great for snifTmg RF with pick- up loop 
134.95 Kit S44.95 Wired 



k 




ramsey ekectrDnics, inc. [ 

2575 Baird Rd. Penfield. NY 14526 ^w 



PHONE ORDERS 
CALL 716 586-3950 



TERMS S^tlatichon g^uaranteed Ejcamme for t{] days, )l not pleased 
return in orieinal form for fefund Add S"^'* lot shippi^ng 
tns-uranca to a ma««rnum of f tO Over&eas add 1S*^^CD£] «iM 
SZ Ordwa \iv*0m9 $iO voa $t 50 H>t r&5iO«nts add 7'.^ Ta^ 



*^S«e list Ot Aavertfsers on 0age f T4 



73Magaifne • July, 1983 145 



f 



DEALER DIRECTORY 



Culver Ctty CA 

Jiuii El«tnxiin. 39lfl ScfHiJvedA Blvd., Culvn- 
Pty CA QQQ^KI. :;(I(M<1Q9. Ttaiks 463-lHJi6 San 
1^1^. 82745732 jReno NVl. 



Fiwrtiiii GA 

hlum^ Cubic, LunBT^ wa 4000 lIllUuiiil prDd- 
Hcts for KHtibvtsi, technicjflfl, cxpsimmTrr Aisi 
CH radio. IdmUnobile Fmttitiut EtnTbrinki^ 3628 
^ierrm Ave., FmtHiu CA y2335. 92^7710. 



SAcramentD CA 

TQ^'EBS— KiJvuitiHl ^mA ftvckfCrtAkup and 
HD^Hlna.. ^kirlheiTt Calilnmu brtory.' diwfl (jd 

RMtfrR«d. ShinxkSfmnciCAaSBS3;«T7-^54Ci. 

Sanjoie CA 

B(»y flTE*'t newest Aimhttir Kidio stortn Nevi^ 6t 
U^ ATnatruT Radio sakii idt lenice. Wr feature 
Kenvricxid. ICOM, AzdHii. Vunm, Ten-Tee^, Sha- 
Ivr 0t miinv ttkit?. ShKvwT fUdw. Inc. p [37i So. 
BaMJuui A^«.. S«i Jtw CA 9SL2§v flW-1 tOa. 

Nev^ CasUe DE 

Ficton AiiihcHTZfd OaJcf! Yasu, I COM. Ten- 
Tec, KDK, A-fdc-n, AFA. K uni nonjcs, Si,m«C- FiiB 
Line of Atii'v^^iri"!'?? Nn ShU^ Ta* in Dt^lawaiv, 
Dntf mjlr rvTf f.QS. Delaware AmatEiir ^ufiply, 
71 McaApH Bo*d, \rw Cartle DE 19730* 
32S.772ft. 

RfH WBTBYZ has ihe l^ri,!^ Stncfc dF Amatetir 
C«at in ihi* IntcTTfTHintAiJi West mad the Bed 
Pnoes. Cjiil ritff for all yiHir ham nenfa. Ron 
DistTiHutinic, 78 So. !iUk. Prstim til ^263. 

BJOOfflJHgtori tL 

AOHN TOUlLRS-mKilaaiedEnKt loiwn. Al 
piv^jEiia^iijtaibk- WftirrjrpittfiHpiicrltd. Abn 
itfr BIT lAhfrlj^Btr dutltbutDn for Antemui 
Speciatttb, RciB;tit!>. ami Hy-Gam. Itlll Raifiia, 
CSOQ G.Z. KiMd Bm 1405, Bloom tngion IL 
eiTOl-OAH?. fma'2141 

Terrc Haute IN 

Your hmm ht4ck|uaiten loc«lifd in thr hmt of the 
midAHisi f lopv-r EksTranks^ liv„ #4 Modom 
CfBU. P.O. &» 3300. Tene Hatate LN 471iE]. 

Western KY 

S^ll mvti And used ^{oiptii^tii & ^'rvk^, titS 
Radio. 307 Mclean Ave.. (lofskioEi^ilk: KV 42240, 

LIttktcmMA 

ITKHdlaUFHainStcirt-Sm-HigNE:. FuHliwof 
ICOM k K^VkXfod. Ymsu IIT^ [>r*tu:. Dama. 
B&Vi' acnsrans. Curtb & Trac keinvn^. Laisen, 
Hustler, Tabx^Hy-Caln pmducts. MlraKrampi.. 
A-rtron P,S., Alpha Dtilla |inP«ei:h:i«. AHHL fit 
K«ntiiiti^k^ ItHtrucrtcjn aJ-ttt. Whisrtkri radar detec- 
tors. Full hrtt: of coaji fitting TEL-fX)M Ekst- 
liviie CoRifnimicatiAm. 8?5 GiEal Ad. iBt 1 19}* 
LJttktin MA 01460. 4ai>4400^3lMO. 

Ann Arfwr MI 

See ui fm prndiMUs hke Ti^n-Tec. B. L. Diake, 
DefiTfi^n and many itaiir Open Munday thrmegh 

Sahirrfiiv. fiR'K) lo 1710 V^T^VCR, VVmUXO, 
U'DBOKN and WHRP khind lb*f t^niMtpr P^r- 
efaaie Hadki Siippl)\t 327 E. Hoovei Avt.^ Ann Ar* 
tw MJ 4Jil&l. fieMflM. 

Somer^t NJ 

Se« ]mr>'i Qiii> tmctatf-m^^anaBii ICOM and 
Yaesu d^ril'iulDf Lan^ Invcfttan of nrU' and 
loed spariab. Most major btmndi In iftock. Curtt- 
plrh: Mii^ifT RodrmiJEMi^. Hadloi Untirntted, 1760 
Eastm AvHiue, P.O. Ba«34T.Soiiwnet NJ 0SS73, 



Buffalo NY 
WESTERN NEW YORK 

P^lapfarB Fnmtkt'ii onlv fiiU stocking Ainarmir 
deakf . Aisa Shcift^asx, dl, ScAnixm, Muinr, 
Comment, Operatiag displav-s featuriii^ Itai* 
latiiid and exhm Ta«ni„ Ajrricfuui. Sai»^ uid 
Scfvks. DX Cmw mgi i tatinffe , ^14 Tnd3ii< Boad. 
Wen SiAtta N'Y. 



AmstenUm NY 
UPSTATE NEW YORK 

Kcti^^RXl, ICOM. Drakr, i^lniv many otIicT lints, 
Anialeui Dcalo: for ovts 35 yrmn . AdiiuviadK Ea- 
dkt ^Kipjplv^ Inc.. 1S5 Wet Mun SbT«4, Ai 
dajo NT mm. 



SyncuK-Borrw-Utka NY 

FatMli^, Kffmnaad. Vaou. ICOM. Drakr, Terv 
Ter* Swaiit DwiTroni, Alpha, Hobot^ NSFJ, Trm- 
p&, A^tmn. KLM, H>4^alri, Mosle). Lanen^ 
Ciiahcralt, Htutkr, Mini PrndiK-iji. Vcm won't be 
dlL^utiptiinted with wjitiiirnrnti'seriitt'. Radio 
'VVnrld. Onrlda County ALrporl-TerTriinal BuiJd^ 
m^Ot^kmy M \MU. 736^1 S4. 



f^umbm OH 
Hit bif^i^si and best Ham Siore in tlw mid^M-cst 

in^i cikplav^ We lidf iml^ thr best. ALtthcinssd 
tkfmwfXHl !kTvli:«r, Univenal Amateur Radki Inc.^ 
ISaa Aitfa Dr., Revnddvtnirg (Uiumhu^] OH 
43068, S66-42ST. 

■^ r^ ^^^^^^^^^ 

Scran tofi PA 

'■A. HiEtltT. Ai^enoa Spectaluti. Amacu Aii'afitL. 
Btkkti. W3AI' W-S^IS. AEA, Vtl«tfilrt, Hjb^ 
Key. Amptvmi. Son>\. fifrW^ CfBi-Seal. Cmn 
Craft, J AV Maif?rl?juw^, AHRL, Aiwwu. Shuw, 
1 JiHiie Etpc4 r(jriii:v, 1 1 12 Grand view St., Sfranlon 
PA J8500, :M:i-2I^. 



MDyntaifftop FA 
W n.K£S^BARRE AREA 

VHF t-HF %iiptnciii & Su^iUea^FmiTi HT*lD 
kW Aiopltiietft Tran^^ettcrs, Co4iDi^Drs« 
\ HF LUF. Mii-ftmii*e lanrar Araplifiefi. C«Aa- 
FET nc&Oi|h, CK^CAR K<itiipment, Ldw >;<xse 
Preamps, Aniimnas. Puwet SuppU*?* Ftipfn; 
Lijii4ir. Mk^'ruwaveModukBt. UHF Unity Puriibol' 
fer, ARCOS, A^ran, FSPT-Tunna. Twnu, Di?n- 
Tfon. Kl^l, Mlrape, Si»nl«-, Tok>iJ Hv'TVi^k-er, 
AnijilienDl, Ti*ti Suiti^^ Un rafuitg. The \'HF 
^lOP. Dtfil. S. HD 4. Boa J4S, MositainUiiJ FA 
lSrOT« 



Dallas TX 

[B^i fOApfiie mUmmit^ produeCi; hobbyfats' 
electrortlcs proftxrt kiti: (.tCOO axnptelc? rrMideim 
kit, sol^srrliiHijrt/sateUitf TV det^ofhir kits, 
EPROM prDgni.Rin>E:r^(luplk'jitnr, pcninjlur ihi-itio 
ry tC testers, data ^ieet», aji^ahcatiDn Fi -u-., .^rvi 
man thaji MOD pafb in ttodic- Ssnasfiduclnn. 
daci^Os ^id«J pnidiicti. tnob I1e«*c w jrtte for 
>TMJ &ve htvratur&catahi^ Inli^iaidiFnt Fleo 
UQBiek 6415^ Aidkic fld„ D«II» IX 7:i3a&, 

Baiti morel W^ashingtoii 

Avantuk irmi'ii.'itrjr^H amjallfien^ (Hiillutnr^ and 
LNAs. OhuIhI vnblff urktl HPrirmctc»r>. BtnndtT 
Tmij^e irlealrr vkiih Miccriwave laboraton- Ap^ 
pM Sis«i''**«. Int .10101 G BaodQ Ditv«, 
BdbvilW, Mar^taid 30110. W'adi. WBSSSSS^ 
blL 79&22H. 7:30 a.n. Id G;00 p.m. S«aida> 
tlmiFHdMv 

DEALERS 

Yo«r company name and message 
can contain up ta 25 wurdnfarm little 
as $150 yearly (prepaid) f or $i5 per 
month {prepaid QiMjrtcrly), No men- 
tion of mmi-order husiTi&^ or area 
code permuted. Dtredmy iett and 
pmpnent must reach us 60 days in ad- 
vance oj publication. For example^ 
advertitintlfor the Sept, '83 ivme must 
be in our hands by Ixdy hi. Mail to 73 
Magazine, Peterhortxtigh NH 03458. 
ATTN: Naruy Ciampa, 



146 73 Magazine • July, 1983 



PROPAGATION ] 



J, H, Netsoff 
4 Plymouth Dr. 
Whiting NJ 08759 



EASTERN UNITED STATES TO: 



GMT: w 02 o* 



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ALASKA 



AflC£NTmA 



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H/EftTO RICO 



90UTH APniCA 



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First letter = night waves. Second = day wav^. 

G = Good, F = Fair, P = Poor. * = Chance of solar flares. 

# ^ Chance of aurora. 

NOTE THAT NIQHT WAVE LETTER NOW COMES FIRST. 



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FT-77 The Big for All Seasons ! 

Answering the call for an HF rig that goes everywhere, sounds great, and Is 
cost-effective, Yaesu proudly introduces the FT-77 Compact HF Transceiver System. 



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Computerized Design and Manufacture 

The FT-77 design engineers utilized the latest computerized circuit board layout methods, resulting in a 
compact, reliable transceiver with maximum utilization of available space. Automated insertion techniques are 
used in assembly, providing improved reliability and quality control over earlier desiqns. 

Operating Versatility 

The FT-77 is equipped for operation on all amateur bands between 3.5 and 29.7 MHz, including the three new 
WARC bands. Fully operational on SSB and CW, the FT-77 includes a dual width noise blanker (designed to 
minimize the "Woodpecker" or ignition noise), full SWR metering, R.LT., and optional CW filter with wide/ 
narrow selection. The optional FM-77 permits operation on the FM mode, with front panel squelch sensitivity 
control. 

Expandable Station Concept 

Ideal for mobile operation because of its compact size and light weight, the FT-77 forms the nucleus of a 
versatile base station. Available as options for the FT-77 are the FP-700 AC Power Supply, FV-700DM 
Synthesized External VFO and Memory System, FTV-707 VHF/UHF Transverter. and FC-700 Antenna 
Coupler, providing top performance at an extraordinarity low price. 

Best of All, It's a Yaesu ! 

With most experience in transceiver design and manufacture, the Yaesu trademark is your guarantee of 
quality and durability. WeVe got all-new technology and an all-new warranty policy to back it up. 

See the FT-77 and the all new line of Yaesu HF, VHF, and UHF transceivers, receivers 
and accessories at your Yaesu Dealer today I Ifs time you tried a Yaesu! 



Prtce And Specifications Subject To 
Change Without Notice Or Obligation 




W 



Tho radlOm 



YAISU 



0283 



1^83 



YAESU ELECTRONICS CORPORATION, 6851 Walthall Way, Paramount, CA 90723 

YAESU Cincinnati Service Center, 9070 Gold Park Dr. Hamilton, Ohio 45011 



(213) 633-4007 
(513) 874-3100 



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Superior dynamic range, auto, antenna tuner, 
QSK, dual NB, 2 VFO's, general coverage receiver. 

TS-930S 



The T$-930S is a superl&tive, high per- 
formance, all-solid state, HP transceiver 
keyed to the exacting requirements of the 
DX and contest operator. It covers all 
Amateur bands from 160 through 10 
meters, and incorporates a 150 kHz to 
30 MHz general coverage receiver having 
an excellent dynamic range. 
Among Its other important features are, 
SSB slope timing, CW VBT, IF notch filter, 
CW pitch control, dual digital VFO's, CW 
full break-in, automatic antenna tuner, 
and a higher voltage operated solid state 
final ampUiler* It is available with or 
without the AT-930 automatic antenna 
tuner built-in, 

TS-930S FEATURES: 

• 180-10 Meters, with 150 kHz-30 MHz 
general coverage receiver* 

Covers all Amateur frequencies from 16040 
meters, including new WARC bands, on 
SSB, CW, FSK, and AM. Features 150 kHz- 
30 MHz general coverage receiver. Separate 
Amateur band access keys allow speedy 
band selection. UP/DOWN bandswltch in 
1-MHz steps. A new, innovative, quadruple 
"UP" conversion, digital PLL synthesized 
circuit provides superior frequency accuracy 
and stability, plus greatly enhanced 
selectivity. 

• Excellent receiver dynamic range. 
Receiver two-tone dynamic range, 100 dB 
typical (20 meters, 50-kHz spacing, 500 Ha; 
CW bandwidth, at sensitivity of 0.25 /iv, 
S/N 10 dB), provides tlie ultimate in rejec- 
tion of IM distortion. 

• A!! solid state, 28 volt operated final 
amplifier* 

The final amplifier operates on 28 VDC for 
lowest IM distortion. Power input rated at 
250 W on SSB, CW. and FSK, and at 80 W 
on AM. Final amplifier protection circuits 
with cooling fan, SWR/Power meter built-in. 
■ CW full break -in. 
CW full break-in circuit uses CMOS logic IC 
plus reed relay for smooth, quiet operation. 
Switchable to semi-break- in. 



« Automatic antenna tuner^ built-in. 

Covers Amateur bands 8040 meters, 
including the new WARC bands. Tuning 
range automatically pre-selected with band 
selection to minimize tuning time. ^'AUTO- 
THRU'' switch on front panel. 

• Dual digital VFO s. 

lO^Hz step dual digital VFO^s include band 
information. Each VFO tunes continuously 
from band to band. A large, heavy, flywheel 
type knob is used for improved tuning ease. 
T.F. Set switch allows fast transmit 
frequency setting for split- frequency opera- 
tions. A=B switch for equalizing one VFO 
frequency to the other. VFO "Lock" switch 
provided. RIT control for +9,9 kHz. 

• Eight memory channels. 

Stores both frequency and band informa- 
tion. VFO-MEMO switch allows use of each 
memory as an independent VFO, (the 
original memory frequency can be recalled 
at will), or as a fixed frequency. Internal 
Battery memory back-up, estimated 1 year 
life. (Batteries not Kenwood supplied], 

* Dual mode noise blanker ["" pulse '^ 
or ^* woodpecker "). 

NB-l. with threshold control, for pulse-type 
noise. NB-2 for longer duration 
"* wood pecker"* type noise. 

• SSB IF slope tuning. 

Allows independent adjustment of the low 
and/ or high frequency slope of die IF pass- 
band, for best interference rejection, HIGH/ 
LOW cut control rotation not affected by 
selecting USB or LSB modes. 

* CW VBT and pitch controls. 
CW Variable Bandwidth Tuning 
control tunes out interfering signals. CW 
pitch controls shifts IF passoand and simul- 
taneously changes the pitch of the beat 
frequency. A "Narrow/ Wide** filter selector 
switch is provided, 

• IT notch filter. 

100 kHz IF notch circuit gives deep, 
sharp, notch, better than -40 dB. 

* Audio filter built-in. 
Tuneable, peak-type audio filter for CW. 

* AC power supply built-in. 

120, 220. or 240 VAC, switch selected 
(operates on AC only) . ■ 

Specif icatiojx^ and prices 



• Fluorescent tube digital display* 

Six digit readout to 100 Hz (10 Hz modi- 
fiable), plus digitalized sub-scale with 
20-kHz steps. Separate two digit indicatioi 
of RIT frequency shift. In CW mode, dis- 
play indicates the actual carrier frequence 
of received as well as transmitted signals! 

• RF speech processor. 

RF clipper type processor provides higher 
average "talk-power,"* improved Intel iigibili 

• One year liznited warranty on parts 
and labor. 

Other features: 

• SSB monitor circuit, 3 step RF attenuator 
VOX. and 100-kHz marker. 

Optional accessories: 

• AT-930 automatic antenna tuner. 

• SP-930 external speaker with selectable 
audio filters. 

• YG-455C I (500 Hz) or yG''455CN-l (250 !■ 
plug-in CW filters for 455-kHz IF. 

• YK-8SC-1 (500 Hz) CW plug-in filter for 
8.83-MHz IF, 

• YK-8gA-i (6 kHz) AM plug-in filter for 
8.83-MHz IF; 

• SOT commercial stability TCXQ (tempera 
ture compensated crystal osciltator). 
Requires modifications. 

• MC-60A deluxe desk microphone with 
UP/DOWN switch, pre-amplifier, 8~pin plu- 

• Tl^922A linear amplifier (not for CW QSK 

• SM-'220 station monitor (not forpan-adap 

• HS-6. HS-5, HS-4. headphones. 

More information on the TS-930S Is 
available from all authorized dealers of 
Trio-Kenwood Communications. 1111 West 
Walnut Street. Compton, California 90220. 

KENWOOC 

. . . pacesefrer in amateur mdio 




are subject to change without notice or obligatior